Summer Programs for Undergraduate and Graduate Students

Undergraduate Courses

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Displaying 205 courses

Accounting I ACCT-101-10

Credits: 3
Main First Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Tue 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Wed 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Thu 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM

This course is an introduction to financial accounting. Financial accounting ...

This course is an introduction to financial accounting. Financial accounting is the process through which an organization reports financial information to interested parties. In other words, it is the language of business. The information is used for decision-making purposes by managers, investors, bankers, labor unions, suppliers, etc. In this class, you will learn how to prepare, analyze and use financial accounting information.
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Accounting II ACCT-102-20

Credits: 3
Main Second Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Tue 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Wed 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Thu 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM

This course is designed to give you, as a manager ...

This course is designed to give you, as a manager in a non-accounting job, the fundamental vocabulary, concepts and procedures to work with management accountants in an informed way to answer questions like these: How effectively are my actions linked with corporate strategy? What activities of mine are differentiating and add value? What are my commodity activities that either destroy value or waste resources? How do I analyze the way a cost is accumulated to make sure it is relevant to a specific decision I must make? How do organizational control and incentive systems affect the motivation levels and actions of people who report to me?

In short, understanding the fundamental vocabulary, concepts and procedures of management accounting will help you
a. grow revenues and profits while planning and controlling related expenses
b. manage risks
c. understand, measure and drive performance
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Business Law ACCT-181-01

Credits: 3
Main Presession
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Tue 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Wed 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Thu 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Fri 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM

In Business Law, we will study some of the basic ...

In Business Law, we will study some of the basic concepts that underlie the American legal system. In particular, we will study the source and application of various types of laws, the court system and elements of constitutional law, torts, product liability, contracts, and sales. These concepts will be applied to issues that arise in a business context. Emphasis will be placed on legal problem solving, i.e., applying principles to given sets of facts and drawing legal conclusions.
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Urban Legends/Moral Panics/Myt ANTH-180-0

Credits: 3
Main First Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Tue 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Wed 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Thu 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM

This course puts under critical review what we think we ...

This course puts under critical review what we think we know about an issue. It provides the analytical tools for students to recognize statistics that defy logic, ideological claims that are passed of as data, moralizing dressed up as human rights issues; and myths that justify exclusion, disenfranchisement, expulsion or incarceration. In short, we will examine the anatomy of myth-making and moral panics and consider the consequences. We will unpack panics and myths around such issues as: human trafficking and the sex trade; gender and sexuality; mail-order brides; migration, refugees, and anchor babies; poverty, violence and incarceration; riots and looting; the American dream and upward mobility; and charitable giving and humanitarian organizations.
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Urban Anthropology ANTH-280-10

Credits: 3
Main First Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Tue 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Wed 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Thu 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM

This course explores the city as a product of, and ...

This course explores the city as a product of, and a rich site for, humans’ negotiations over social and economic rights, identity, cultural meaning, and community. Drawing on a variety of historical, geographic, and ethnographic studies, we will ask whether urban life is qualitatively distinct from rural life. The city is a site of economic and political centralization, but also a landscape of sentiment and memory. It is a space of ritual observance and spectacle, as well as the location of suffering and dysfunction. Debates over urban planning encompass moral, cultural, and personal concerns, not simply the designs of economists, policymakers, and architects. Throughout the course, methodological questions regarding the city as an object of historical and ethnographic study are highlighted. We will look at ancient Rome, Tokyo’s markets, mid-20th century New York City, contemporary Washington, DC and Los Angeles, and the wounded cities of New Orleans, Sarajevo, and Beirut in order to understand the complexity of the urban experience through a holistic and critical anthropological lens.
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Anthropology of Human Rights ANTH-282-20

Credits: 3
Main Second Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Tue 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Wed 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Thu 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM

This course explores the history, construction, and practice of human ...

This course explores the history, construction, and practice of human rights from an anthropological perspective. Where anthropology is committed to exploring the diversity of human experience ethnographically through local frames of meaning, human rights organizations, United Nations bodies, and international humanitarian law and conventions have historically emphasized universal norms that transcend cultural differences and local particularities. To what extent can these two perspectives be reconciled? What can anthropology tell us about the potential and limitations of the human rights discourses? How are conceptions of individual and collective rights constructed in contemporary political contexts? Can anthropology help us rethink our conception of what it is to be human? What it means to have rights? How can anthropology help us trace the cultural underpinnings and trajectories of genocide and torture? When anthropologists turn their attention to the aftermath of human rights abuses, can they help us think more productively about truth and reconciliation commissions, humanitarian intervention, and responses to post-traumatic stress disorder? How do anthropologists grapple with the ethical questions implicit in doing research in settings where human rights violations have impacted the communities they are studying, and where dangers might still be present? Should anthropologists be advocates as well as analysts? Witnesses as well as researchers?
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Intens 1st Lev Mod Stand Arb I ARAB-011-10

Credits: 6
Main First Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 8:30 AM - 11:55 AM
  • Tue 8:30 AM - 11:55 AM
  • Wed 8:30 AM - 11:55 AM
  • Thu 8:30 AM - 11:55 AM
  • Fri 8:30 AM - 11:55 AM

Not for native speakers of Arabic. There is no pass/fail option for this course. Please contact the Summer and Special Programs Office at (202) 687-8200 for more information.

This intensive multi-media course focuses on developing proficiency in the ...

This intensive multi-media course focuses on developing proficiency in the standard written Arabic language, as well as formal spoken Arabic. It begins with learning of script and phonology, and works rapidly into a wide range of situation-based texts and topics that build vocabulary, grammar, and general communicative competence.
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Intens 1st Lv Mod Stnd Arab II ARAB-012-20

Credits: 6
Main Second Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 8:30 AM - 11:55 AM
  • Tue 8:30 AM - 11:55 AM
  • Wed 8:30 AM - 11:55 AM
  • Thu 8:30 AM - 11:55 AM
  • Fri 8:30 AM - 11:55 AM

Requires the successful completion of ARAB-011 or permission of instructor. There is no pass/option for this course. Please contact the Summer and Special Programs Office at (202) 687-8200 for more information. Visiting students must take a placement test prior to registering for this course.

This intensive multi-media course focuses on developing proficiency in the ...

This intensive multi-media course focuses on developing proficiency in the standard written Arabic language, as well as formal spoken Arabic. It begins with learning of script and phonology, and works rapidly into a wide range of situation-based texts and topics that build vocabulary, grammar, and general communicative competence.
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Intens 2nd Lvl Md Stnd Arab I ARAB-111-10

Credits: 6
Main First Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Tue 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Wed 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Thu 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Fri 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM

Requires successful completion of ARAB 012 or permission of instructor. There is no pass/fail option for this course. Visiting students must take a placement test prior to registering for this course. Please contact the Summer and Special Programs Office at (202) 687-8200 for more information.

This intensive multi-media course covers topics and situations relating to ...

This intensive multi-media course covers topics and situations relating to contemporary Arabic media, literature and culture. Focus is on acquisition of more complex grammatical structures, expanding vocabulary and discourse skills, and on developing competence in a wide range of communicative situations.
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Intens 2nd Lv Mod Stnd Arab II ARAB-112-20

Credits: 6
Main Second Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Tue 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Wed 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Thu 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Fri 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM

Requires successful completion of ARAB 111 or permission of instructor. There is no pass/fail option for this course. Visiting students must take a placement test prior to registering for this course. Please contact the Summer and Special Programs Office at (202) 687-8200 for more information.

This intensive multi-media course covers topics and situations relating to ...

This intensive multi-media course covers topics and situations relating to contemporary Arabic media, literature and culture. Focus is on acquisition of more complex grammatical structures, expanding vocabulary and discourse skills, and on developing competence in a wide range of communicative situations.
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Intens Spoken Levantine Arab ARAB-117-30

Credits: 3
Cross Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 6:00 PM - 8:30 PM
  • Tue 6:00 PM - 8:30 PM
  • Wed 6:00 PM - 8:30 PM
  • Thu 6:00 PM - 8:30 PM

This course is intended to build proficiency in the Levantine ...

This course is intended to build proficiency in the Levantine dialect, through practice of interactive functional skills such as listening comprehension, conversation strategies (linguistic and cultural), and vocabulary building. It assumes knowledge of Arabic script and Modern Standard Arabic grammatical structure. It is designed to enable students to communicate actively and appropriately on a wide range of topics. Prerequisite: at least one year of intensive Modern Standard Arabic.
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Intens 3rd Lvl Md Stnd Arab I ARAB-215-10

Credits: 6
Main First Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Tue 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Wed 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Thu 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Fri 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM

Requires successful completion of ARAB-112, permission of instructor or successful completion of placement test. There is no pass/fail option for this course. Please contact the Summer and Special Programs Office at (202) 687-8200 for more information.

This is an intensive, largely media-based course focusing on developing ...

This is an intensive, largely media-based course focusing on developing proficiency in reading and discussion of texts in international relations, history, Islam, and current affairs. In addition to extensive reading, it includes composition exercises, review of Arabic grammar, listening skills, and conversation practice.
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Intens 3rd Lvl Md Stnd Arab II ARAB-216-20

Credits: 6
Main Second Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Tue 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Wed 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Thu 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Fri 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM

Requires successful completion of ARAB-215, permission of instructor or successful completion of placement test. There is no pass/fail option for this course. Please contact the Summer and Special Programs Office at (202) 687-8200 for more information.

This is an intensive, largely media-based course focusing on developing ...

This is an intensive, largely media-based course focusing on developing proficiency in reading and discussion of texts in international relations, history, Islam, and current affairs. In addition to extensive reading, it includes composition exercises, review of Arabic grammar, listening skills, and conversation practice.
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Media Arabic ARAB-327-20

Credits: 3
Main Second Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Tue 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Wed 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Thu 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM

The purpose of this course is to give students another ...

The purpose of this course is to give students another opportunity to further develop their reading, listening and speaking skills. The focus will be on current events or issues in the Arab world featured in the Arab media. The materials will be reports, articles, stories, opinion pieces, interviews, film clips, songs, and the like. The topics will be political, social, cultural, or economy and development related. A key feature of the course will be discussions of such materials.
Prerequisite: Advanced Arabic (three years of MSA) or instructors' permission required.
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Renaissance to Modern Art ARTH-102-10

Credits: 3
Main First Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Tue 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Wed 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Thu 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM

This course surveys the major achievements in western pictorial art ...

This course surveys the major achievements in western pictorial art, sculpture and architecture from the early Renaissance to the twentieth century. Students will develop skills in analyzing and interpreting original works of art. Fall and Spring.
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19th Century American Art ARTH-141-10

Credits: 3
Main First Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Tue 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Wed 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Thu 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM

The course covers the formation and development of American artistic ...

The course covers the formation and development of American artistic traditions from the colonial period through the twentieth century. Museum study and class presentations will emphasize original works of art.
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Drawing I:Visual Language ARTS-110-20

Credits: 3
Main Second Session
Studio
Day and Time
  • Mon 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Tue 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Wed 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Thu 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM

Students are required to work on their studio projects one hour outside of class for every hour scheduled in class.

The various disciplines, techniques, and theories of drawing will be ...

The various disciplines, techniques, and theories of drawing will be studied as the student learns to train his or her hand, eye and imagination in the assigned practical problems of drawing. Students enrolled in Studio courses must devote a minimum of 4 - 6 hours per week outside of class to develop and complete assignments. These times are flexible and can be rearranged with the instructor. No prerequisite. Fall and Spring.

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Intro to Printmaking ARTS-120-10

Credits: 3
Main First Session
Studio
Day and Time
  • Mon 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Tue 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Wed 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Thu 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM

Students are required to work on their studio projects one hour outside of class for every hour scheduled in class.

This course is designed for beginning to advanced students who ...

This course is designed for beginning to advanced students who wish to experience traditional “hands on” printmaking methods and materials. The course is excellent for studio and art history majors. The basic printmaking techniques covered include; Intaglio, the favorite of Rembrandt, which covers etching and drypoint on copper and zinc, Lithography on stone, as Whistler and Picasso practiced, and Relief on linoleum and wood in the manner of Rockwell Kent and Hiroshege. Students will do assigned test prints in each technique and develop their own personal imagery using the method of their choice.
Museum and Gallery visits are required.

No prerequisite
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Photography I ARTS-130-20

Credits: 3
Main Second Session
Studio
Day and Time
  • Mon 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Tue 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Wed 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Thu 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM

Students are required to work on their studio projects one hour outside of class for every hour scheduled in class.

Basic Photography is a studio art course designed to develop ...

Basic Photography is a studio art course designed to develop the hands-on skills necessary to produce and identify the elements of a good photograph and to acquire a thorough working knowledge of film and digital equipment. Students will gain an understanding of the aesthetic and technical areas of photography as a fine art. Class lectures, discussions and darkroom lab assignments will deal with photographic composition, criticism and history, camera and lens types, film types, and film and paper development systems. Fundamental knowledge of computer programs such as Photoshop will be introduced later in the semester to combine and enhance photographic imagery. Students enrolled in Studio courses must devote a minimum of 4 - 6 hours per week outside of class to develop and complete assignments. These times are flexible and can be rearranged with the instructor.
Fall and Spring.

No prerequisite.
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Painting I: Oil ARTS-150-20

Credits: 3
Main Second Session
Studio
Day and Time
  • Mon 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Tue 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Wed 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Thu 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM

This course is an introduction to the materials and techniques ...

This course is an introduction to the materials and techniques used in painting, with an emphasis on oils. It will cover mastery of technique, composition and color as vehicles for individual expression.

Fall and Spring.

No prerequisite.
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Landscape Painting ARTS-155-01

Credits: 3
Main Presession
Studio
Day and Time
  • Mon 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Tue 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Wed 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Thu 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM

Intro to Graphic Design ARTS-162-01

Credits: 3
Main Presession
Studio
Day and Time
  • Mon 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Tue 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Wed 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Thu 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Fri 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM

Students are required to work on their studio projects one hour outside of class for every hour scheduled in class.

This course is an introduction to graphic design. Students will ...

This course is an introduction to graphic design. Students will learn the formal, aesthetic and communicative aspects of creating effective graphic images. Students will learn to use a range of graphic software tools. Projects will include logos, product packaging and other design challenges as experiences that will promote mastery of technique, methods and materials. The goal in this class is to strengthen a students' visual literacy and communication skills as part of their liberal arts education.
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Ecology & the Environment BIOL-008-10

Credits: 3
Main First Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Tue 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Wed 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Thu 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM

At a time when we face a number of serious ...

At a time when we face a number of serious environmental challenges, an understanding of ecology is important. The objectives of this course are to provide nonscience majors with an introduction to ecologic concepts and to discuss several important environmental issues. Includes a survey of mechanisms and processes at work in the environment, with a focus on current understanding of environmental issues such as climate change, population growth, pollution, agriculture, and emerging diseases. The course explores environmental sustainability and the connection between individual actions and global processes.
This course satisfies the general education requirement for a science course and is not open to students majoring in a science.
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
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Found in Biology I BIOL-105-20

Credits: 3
Main Second Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 8:15 AM - 10:15 AM
  • Tue 8:15 AM - 10:15 AM
  • Thu 8:15 AM - 10:15 AM
  • Fri 8:15 AM - 10:15 AM

This first session of an integrated two semester course focuses ...

This first session of an integrated two semester course focuses upon central concepts in cell biology, biological chemistry, genetics, and development. The relevance of these concepts to specialized cell function is presented with emphasis on the roles of gene expression and signal transduction in the physiology of mammalian systems, particularly the immune, reproductive, endocrine, and nervous systems.

Biol 105/115 is equivalent to Biol 103/113 offered in Fall semesters.
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Found in Biology II BIOL-106-10

Credits: 3
Main First Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 8:15 AM - 10:15 AM
  • Tue 8:15 AM - 10:15 AM
  • Thu 8:15 AM - 10:15 AM
  • Fri 8:15 AM - 10:15 AM

Foundations of Biology II emphasizes evolution, the diversity of life ...

Foundations of Biology II emphasizes evolution, the diversity of life on Earth, and ecology. In the course, you will become acquainted with the process of evolution through natural selection, the astonishing diversity of living organisms that has evolved through this process, and the complex ecological interactions that occur among species.
Laboratory experiments (in a separate course), demonstrations, on-line exercises, and field studies complement the lectures.
Credits: 3
Pre-reqs: None

Biol 106/116 is equivalent to Biol 104/114 offered in Spring semesters.
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Found in Biology I-Lab BIOL-115-20

Credits: 2
Main Second Session
Laboratory
Day and Time
  • Mon 10:30 AM - 1:10 PM
  • Tue 10:30 AM - 1:10 PM
  • Thu 10:30 AM - 1:10 PM
  • Fri 10:30 AM - 1:10 PM

Students must also register for BIOL 105-20.

Laboratory component of Foundations in Biology (BIOL 105). Equivalent to ...

Laboratory component of Foundations in Biology (BIOL 105). Equivalent to BIOL 113 offered in Fall.
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Found in Biology II-Lab BIOL-116-10

Credits: 2
Main First Session
Laboratory
Day and Time
  • Mon 10:30 AM - 1:10 PM
  • Tue 10:30 AM - 1:10 PM
  • Thu 10:30 AM - 1:10 PM
  • Fri 10:30 AM - 1:10 PM

Students must also register for BIOL 106-10.

This laboratory course is designed to accompany the lecture course ...

This laboratory course is designed to accompany the lecture course of FOundations of Biology II (Biol 106). The laboratory course will emphasize methods of research, including laboratory and field techniques, collecting and analyzing data, and scientific writing.

Credits: 2
Co-req: Biol 106 or a college-level Biology course covering evolution, ecology, and diversity.

Biol 106/116 is equivalent to Biol 104/114 offered in Spring semesters.
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Mammalian Physiology BIOL-175-10

Credits: 4
Main First Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 10:45 AM - 1:20 PM
  • Tue 10:45 AM - 1:20 PM
  • Wed 10:45 AM - 1:20 PM
  • Thu 10:45 AM - 1:20 PM

This course must be taken with BIOL-176-10.

This course will explore function and regulation of all of ...

This course will explore function and regulation of all of the major systems of the mammalian body, most of it related to humans. For many systems, structure and function are intimately related and these relationships will be detailed especially in the nervous, muscular, circulatory, pulmonary, excretory and digestive systems. How these systems serve to maintain homeostasis will be a unifying theme throughout the course.

This course fulfills the "Cells and Systems" distribution requirement for Biology majors. It was previous offered as BIOL-208.
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Mammalian Physiology Lab BIOL-176-10

Credits: 1
Main First Session
Laboratory
Day and Time
  • Mon 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Tue 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Wed 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Thu 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM

This course must be taken with BIOL-175-10.

Laboratory portion of Mammalian Physiology. must be taken with BIOL ...

Laboratory portion of Mammalian Physiology. must be taken with BIOL 175.
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General Chemistry Lecture I CHEM-001-10

Credits: 3
Main First Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 8:10 AM - 10:10 AM
  • Tue 8:10 AM - 10:10 AM
  • Wed 8:10 AM - 10:10 AM
  • Thu 8:10 AM - 10:10 AM

This course must be taken with CHEM-009.

CHEM 001 is the first of a two-semester General Chemistry ...

CHEM 001 is the first of a two-semester General Chemistry Lecture sequence and receives 3-credits. CHEM 001 is taken concurrently with General Chemistry Laboratory I (CHEM 009) and is a prerequisite for General Chemistry Lecture II (CHEM 002). The course involves an intensive exploration of the fundamental ideas in chemistry and includes (but not limited to) the following general topics: measurements, atomic structure, bonding theories, states of matter, intermolecular forces, stoichiometry, periodic trends, properties of solutions, and thermochemistry. Fall.
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General Chemistry Lec II CHEM-002-20

Credits: 3
Main Second Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 8:10 AM - 10:10 AM
  • Tue 8:10 AM - 10:10 AM
  • Wed 8:10 AM - 10:10 AM
  • Thu 8:10 AM - 10:10 AM

This course must be taken with CHEM-010.

CHEM-002 is the second semester of a two semester General ...

CHEM-002 is the second semester of a two semester General Chemistry Lecture sequence and receives 3 credits. CHEM-002 is taken concurrently with General Chemistry II Laboratory (CHEM-010) and is a prerequisite for Organic Chemistry Lecture I (CHEM-117). In this course the following topics will be covered: intermolecular forces, liquids, solids, properties of solutions, chemical kinetics, chemical equilibrium, acid-base chemistry, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, coordination chemistry, nuclear chemistry and chemistry of environment. Concurrent: 010. Prerequisite: 001. Spring.
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General Chemistry Lab I CHEM-009-10

Credits: 2
Main First Session
Recitation
Day and Time
  • Mon 10:15 AM - 11:25 AM
  • Tue 10:15 AM - 11:25 AM
  • Wed 10:15 AM - 11:25 AM
  • Thu 10:15 AM - 11:25 AM
 
Laboratory
  • Mon 12:10 PM - 2:45 PM
  • Tue 12:10 PM - 2:45 PM
  • Wed 12:10 PM - 2:45 PM
  • Thu 12:10 PM - 2:45 PM

This course must be taken with CHEM-001.

Coherent with the lecture course, this class aims to provide ...

Coherent with the lecture course, this class aims to provide a foundation in Chemistry, specific to the laboratory experience. Where the lecture introduces, explores, and expands concepts, through a dialogue with the lecture professor; the laboratory is where the students are the active participant: performing experiments, collecting data, analyzing data, and conveying their findings through written reports. The lecture and the lab act in concert, in synergy, where the student achieves a holistic understanding of Chemistry, of science. This is the scientific process – idea, testing, refinement, and understanding/discovery. This is what scientists do, this is what professors do. All these aspects embody the knowledge and the skills students are expected to learn and master on finishing a year of Gen Chem. A few examples of what students attain in this course:
• Knowledge, understanding, command of introductory concepts & pinnacles of chemistry (reactions, stoichiometry, thermodynamics, atomic theory, etc.)
• Skills: problem-solving, writing science reports, math, working/interacting in groups…
• Acquire and develop common lab techniques, practices, and safety requirements
• Relating chemical concepts to the real world
• Applying & innovating learned material to new or unseen situations
• Ability to utilize and transfer learned ideas and techniques to upper division science courses
Chem-009 is composed of two parts: lab and recitation. Students will be in the lab performing an experiment on a weekly basis. The first lab period focuses on check-in and safety, which is first and foremost the most important. Recitation is a time where students can ask questions pertaining to the lecture portion of General Chemistry and about previous and upcoming lab experiments. Recitation meets twice a week, with one preceding the lab.
Concurrent: 001. Fall.
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General Chemistry Lab I CHEM-009-12

Credits: 2
Main First Session
Recitation
Day and Time
  • Mon 10:15 AM - 11:25 AM
  • Tue 10:15 AM - 11:25 AM
  • Wed 10:15 AM - 11:25 AM
  • Thu 10:15 AM - 11:25 AM
 
Laboratory
  • Mon 12:10 PM - 2:45 PM
  • Tue 12:10 PM - 2:45 PM
  • Wed 12:10 PM - 2:45 PM
  • Thu 12:10 PM - 2:45 PM

This course must be taken with CHEM-001.

Coherent with the lecture course, this class aims to provide ...

Coherent with the lecture course, this class aims to provide a foundation in Chemistry, specific to the laboratory experience. Where the lecture introduces, explores, and expands concepts, through a dialogue with the lecture professor; the laboratory is where the students are the active participant: performing experiments, collecting data, analyzing data, and conveying their findings through written reports. The lecture and the lab act in concert, in synergy, where the student achieves a holistic understanding of Chemistry, of science. This is the scientific process – idea, testing, refinement, and understanding/discovery. This is what scientists do, this is what professors do. All these aspects embody the knowledge and the skills students are expected to learn and master on finishing a year of Gen Chem. A few examples of what students attain in this course:
• Knowledge, understanding, command of introductory concepts & pinnacles of chemistry (reactions, stoichiometry, thermodynamics, atomic theory, etc.)
• Skills: problem-solving, writing science reports, math, working/interacting in groups…
• Acquire and develop common lab techniques, practices, and safety requirements
• Relating chemical concepts to the real world
• Applying & innovating learned material to new or unseen situations
• Ability to utilize and transfer learned ideas and techniques to upper division science courses
Chem-009 is composed of two parts: lab and recitation. Students will be in the lab performing an experiment on a weekly basis. The first lab period focuses on check-in and safety, which is first and foremost the most important. Recitation is a time where students can ask questions pertaining to the lecture portion of General Chemistry and about previous and upcoming lab experiments. Recitation meets twice a week, with one preceding the lab.
Concurrent: 001. Fall.
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General Chemistry Lab II CHEM-010-20

Credits: 2
Main Second Session
Recitation
Day and Time
  • Mon 10:15 AM - 11:25 AM
  • Tue 10:15 AM - 11:25 AM
  • Wed 10:15 AM - 11:25 AM
  • Thu 10:15 AM - 11:25 AM
 
Laboratory
  • Mon 12:10 PM - 2:45 PM
  • Tue 12:10 PM - 2:45 PM
  • Wed 12:10 PM - 2:45 PM
  • Thu 12:10 PM - 2:45 PM

This course must be taken with CHEM-002.

: Prior lab experience helped students in gaining familiarity with the ...

: Prior lab experience helped students in gaining familiarity with the tools and instruments utilized in the lab. In this current lab course, students hone and refine their skills and techniques. Much like the first semester in Gen Chem, working safely in the laboratory is paramount. Gen Chem lab II delves into important topics such as equilibria. The first semester introduced students to different types of chemical reactions. In the second semester, students gain a better understanding as to the determinants of reaction type. More importantly, students will gain insights into the extent (equilibria) with which reactants progress to products. The remainder of the laboratory experiments provides students with background in solid structures, electrochemistry, coordination chemistry, etc. A few examples of what students attain in this course:
• Knowledge, understanding, command of introductory concepts & pinnacles of chemistry (reactions, stoichiometry, thermodynamics, kinetics, equilibria, solid structures, electrochemistry, coordination chemistry, etc.)
• Skills: problem-solving, writing science reports, math, working/interacting in groups…
• Hone and refine common lab techniques, practices, and safety requirements
• Relating chemical concepts to the real world
• Applying & innovating learned material to new or unseen situations
• Ability to utilize and transfer learned ideas and techniques to upper division science courses
Chem-010 is composed of two parts: lab and recitation. Students will be in the lab performing an experiment on a weekly basis. Recitation is a time where students can ask questions pertaining to the lecture portion of General Chemistry and about previous and upcoming lab experiments. Recitation meets twice a week, with one preceding the lab.
Concurrent: -002. Spring.
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General Chemistry Lab II CHEM-010-22

Credits: 2
Main Second Session
Recitation
Day and Time
  • Mon 10:15 AM - 11:25 AM
  • Tue 10:15 AM - 11:25 AM
  • Wed 10:15 AM - 11:25 AM
  • Thu 10:15 AM - 11:25 AM
 
Laboratory
  • Mon 12:10 PM - 2:45 PM
  • Tue 12:10 PM - 2:45 PM
  • Wed 12:10 PM - 2:45 PM
  • Thu 12:10 PM - 2:45 PM

This course must be taken with CHEM-002.

: Prior lab experience helped students in gaining familiarity with the ...

: Prior lab experience helped students in gaining familiarity with the tools and instruments utilized in the lab. In this current lab course, students hone and refine their skills and techniques. Much like the first semester in Gen Chem, working safely in the laboratory is paramount. Gen Chem lab II delves into important topics such as equilibria. The first semester introduced students to different types of chemical reactions. In the second semester, students gain a better understanding as to the determinants of reaction type. More importantly, students will gain insights into the extent (equilibria) with which reactants progress to products. The remainder of the laboratory experiments provides students with background in solid structures, electrochemistry, coordination chemistry, etc. A few examples of what students attain in this course:
• Knowledge, understanding, command of introductory concepts & pinnacles of chemistry (reactions, stoichiometry, thermodynamics, kinetics, equilibria, solid structures, electrochemistry, coordination chemistry, etc.)
• Skills: problem-solving, writing science reports, math, working/interacting in groups…
• Hone and refine common lab techniques, practices, and safety requirements
• Relating chemical concepts to the real world
• Applying & innovating learned material to new or unseen situations
• Ability to utilize and transfer learned ideas and techniques to upper division science courses
Chem-010 is composed of two parts: lab and recitation. Students will be in the lab performing an experiment on a weekly basis. Recitation is a time where students can ask questions pertaining to the lecture portion of General Chemistry and about previous and upcoming lab experiments. Recitation meets twice a week, with one preceding the lab.
Concurrent: -002. Spring.
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Intro to Forensic Chemistry CHEM-025-20

Credits: 3
Main Second Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Tue 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Wed 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Thu 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM

This course is designed for the non-science major students to ...

This course is designed for the non-science major students to stimulate their interest in the forensic chemistry and help them appreciate and understand the basic fundamental concepts of chemistry. In each chapter, chemical concepts related to a forensic topic are introduced in addition to a brief description of an analytical instrumentation or methodology used in crime investigation lab and a case study. The main purpose of this course is to deliver the chemistry concepts to students without going into great details.
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Organic Chemistry I CHEM-115-10

Credits: 3
Main First Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 12:00 PM - 2:00 PM
  • Tue 12:00 PM - 2:00 PM
  • Wed 12:00 PM - 2:00 PM
  • Thu 12:00 PM - 2:00 PM
  • Fri 12:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Principles and theories of organic chemistry, including structural changes as ...

Principles and theories of organic chemistry, including structural changes as studied by spectroscopy (IR, NMR, and mass spectra). Preparations, reactions, mechanisms, stereochemistry, and properties of alkanes, alkenes, alkyl halides, alcohols, ethers, aldehydes, ketones, and organometallic compounds are studied in detail. Prerequisites: -002, -010. Three lectures plus evening sessions for exams. Fall.
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Organic Chemistry II CHEM-116-20

Credits: 3
Main Second Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 12:00 PM - 2:00 PM
  • Tue 12:00 PM - 2:00 PM
  • Wed 12:00 PM - 2:00 PM
  • Thu 12:00 PM - 2:00 PM
  • Fri 12:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Continues and presupposes -115. Compounds studied include aromatic compounds, amines ...

Continues and presupposes -115. Compounds studied include aromatic compounds, amines, carbonyl-containing compounds, conjugated and difunctional compounds, heterocyclics, and the biologically important amino acids, peptides, and carbohydrates. Prerequisite: -115. Three lectures plus evening sessions for exams. Spring.
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Organic Chemistry I Lab CHEM-117-10

Credits: 2
Main First Session
Laboratory
Day and Time
  • Wed 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Thu 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Fri 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
 
Recitation
  • Tue 8:30 AM - 10:15 AM

Introduction to experimental organic chemistry. Fundamental techniques of organic synthesis ...

Introduction to experimental organic chemistry. Fundamental techniques of organic synthesis, including separation, purification, and characterization of organic compounds. Introduction to spectroscopic and chromatographic methods. Prerequisites: 002, 010. Concurrent: 115. One four-hour laboratory and one one-hour recitation. Fall.
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Organic Chemistry I Lab CHEM-117-11

Credits: 2
Main First Session
Recitation
Day and Time
  • Tue 2:45 PM - 4:30 PM
 
Laboratory
  • Wed 3:00 PM - 6:15 PM
  • Thu 3:00 PM - 6:15 PM
  • Fri 3:00 PM - 6:15 PM

Introduction to experimental organic chemistry. Fundamental techniques of organic synthesis ...

Introduction to experimental organic chemistry. Fundamental techniques of organic synthesis, including separation, purification, and characterization of organic compounds. Introduction to spectroscopic and chromatographic methods. Prerequisites: 002, 010. Concurrent: 115. One four-hour laboratory and one one-hour recitation. Fall.
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Organic Chemistry I Lab CHEM-117-12

Credits: 2
Main First Session
Recitation
Day and Time
  • Tue 2:45 PM - 4:30 PM
 
Laboratory
  • Wed 3:00 PM - 6:15 PM
  • Thu 3:00 PM - 6:15 PM
  • Fri 3:00 PM - 6:15 PM

Introduction to experimental organic chemistry. Fundamental techniques of organic synthesis ...

Introduction to experimental organic chemistry. Fundamental techniques of organic synthesis, including separation, purification, and characterization of organic compounds. Introduction to spectroscopic and chromatographic methods. Prerequisites: 002, 010. Concurrent: 115. One four-hour laboratory and one one-hour recitation. Fall.
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Organic Chemistry I Lab CHEM-117-13

Credits: 2
Main First Session
Recitation
Day and Time
  • Tue 8:30 AM - 10:15 AM
 
Laboratory
  • Wed 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Thu 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Fri 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM

Introduction to experimental organic chemistry. Fundamental techniques of organic synthesis ...

Introduction to experimental organic chemistry. Fundamental techniques of organic synthesis, including separation, purification, and characterization of organic compounds. Introduction to spectroscopic and chromatographic methods. Prerequisites: 002, 010. Concurrent: 115. One four-hour laboratory and one one-hour recitation. Fall.
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Organic Chemistry II Lab CHEM-118-20

Credits: 2
Main Second Session
Recitation
Day and Time
  • Tue 8:30 AM - 10:15 AM
 
Laboratory
  • Wed 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Thu 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Fri 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM

Continues and presupposes -117. More complex synthetic reactions, including cycloadditions ...

Continues and presupposes -117. More complex synthetic reactions, including cycloadditions, carbonyl additions and condensations, isolation of natural products; qualitative organic analysis. Prerequisites: 115 and -117. Concurrent: -116. One four-hour laboratory and one one-hour recitation. Spring.
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Organic Chemistry II Lab CHEM-118-21

Credits: 2
Main Second Session
Recitation
Day and Time
  • Tue 2:45 PM - 4:30 PM
 
Laboratory
  • Wed 3:00 PM - 6:15 PM
  • Thu 3:00 PM - 6:15 PM
  • Fri 3:00 PM - 6:15 PM

Continues and presupposes -117. More complex synthetic reactions, including cycloadditions ...

Continues and presupposes -117. More complex synthetic reactions, including cycloadditions, carbonyl additions and condensations, isolation of natural products; qualitative organic analysis. Prerequisites: 115 and -117. Concurrent: -116. One four-hour laboratory and one one-hour recitation. Spring.
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Organic Chemistry II Lab CHEM-118-22

Credits: 2
Main Second Session
Recitation
Day and Time
  • Tue 2:45 PM - 4:30 PM
 
Laboratory
  • Wed 3:00 PM - 6:15 PM
  • Thu 3:00 PM - 6:15 PM
  • Fri 3:00 PM - 6:15 PM

Continues and presupposes -117. More complex synthetic reactions, including cycloadditions ...

Continues and presupposes -117. More complex synthetic reactions, including cycloadditions, carbonyl additions and condensations, isolation of natural products; qualitative organic analysis. Prerequisites: 115 and -117. Concurrent: -116. One four-hour laboratory and one one-hour recitation. Spring.
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Organic Chemistry II Lab CHEM-118-23

Credits: 2
Main Second Session
Recitation
Day and Time
  • Tue 8:30 AM - 10:15 AM
 
Laboratory
  • Wed 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Thu 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Fri 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM

Continues and presupposes -117. More complex synthetic reactions, including cycloadditions ...

Continues and presupposes -117. More complex synthetic reactions, including cycloadditions, carbonyl additions and condensations, isolation of natural products; qualitative organic analysis. Prerequisites: 115 and -117. Concurrent: -116. One four-hour laboratory and one one-hour recitation. Spring.
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Intermediate Greek CLSG-101-01

Credits: 3
Main Presession
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 9:00 AM - 10:30 AM
  • Tue 9:00 AM - 10:30 AM
  • Wed 9:00 AM - 10:30 AM
  • Thu 9:00 AM - 10:30 AM
  • Fri 9:00 AM - 10:30 AM
 
Lecture
  • Mon 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM
  • Tue 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM
  • Wed 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM
  • Thu 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM
  • Fri 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM

Satisfies COL language requirement.

Students read Plato’s Apology, which represents Socrates’ speech at ...

Students read Plato’s Apology, which represents Socrates’ speech at his trial for impiety, and Euripides’ Medea. The Apology introduces the concentrated prose of philosophic argument in the novel setting of a forensic speech. Students also study the historical context of the trial itself: the defeat of Athens, the reign and fall of the Thirty, and the restoration of democracy. With the Medea, students turn to the poetry of Attic tragedy, and become become familiar with the structures of ancient tragedy as well as the dramatic festivals of Athens as the setting for tragic productions. By the end of this course students will:
• Read Plato’s Apology and Euripides’ Medea;
• Demonstrate control of Greek morphology and syntax;
• Acquire vocabulary necessary to read central Attic poetic and prose texts;
• Develop proficiency in translating at sight Greek poetry and prose;
• Learn about Greek prosody and understand Greek verse structures, including the iambic trimeter;
• Acquire an awareness of the differences between the Attic and Doric dialects, as featured in tragedy.
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Intermediate Latin CLSL-101-01

Credits: 3
Main Presession
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 9:30 AM - 11:00 AM
  • Tue 9:30 AM - 11:00 AM
  • Wed 9:30 AM - 11:00 AM
  • Thu 9:30 AM - 11:00 AM
  • Fri 9:30 AM - 11:00 AM
 
Lecture
  • Mon 2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
  • Tue 2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
  • Wed 2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
  • Thu 2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
  • Fri 2:00 PM - 3:15 PM

Satisfies COL language requirement.

Intermediate Latin is intended for students who have successfully completed ...

Intermediate Latin is intended for students who have successfully completed Latin I at Georgetown or have otherwise acquired the ability to read Latin texts in the original, with a good basic knowledge of vocabulary and grammar. While these same elements (vocabulary, morphology, syntax) will be constantly reviewed and constitute an essential part of home and class work, a new stress will be increasingly posed on matters related to literary genres, poetic diction, rhetoric, meter, etc. In fact, students will be introduced to handling Latin literature directly, and especially through the study of those very authors that represent the basis for virtually all grammatical notions and abstractions so far learned, i.e. Cicero and Virgil.

Intermediate Latin fulfills the language requirement in the College.
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Intro to Informatn Technology COSC-010-10

Credits: 3
Main First Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Tue 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Wed 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Thu 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM

This course is for non-majors seeking an introduction to the ...

This course is for non-majors seeking an introduction to the principles and practices of information technology and computer science. These concepts are introduced in the context of current and future computing technologies such as computer graphics, Web programming, and artificial intelligence. As well, the course introduces some of the economic, legal, ethical, and social issues related to the capabilities and limitations of network and computing technology. The course first presents the basics of computing machinery: information and its representations, elements of computer organization, and low-level machine hardware. Next, the course covers the basics of computing software: algorithms and computer programming in machine, assembly, and high-level programming languages. Using the theories of computability and complexity, a discussion of the general capabilities and limitations of computing and networks follows. Finally, a survey of some computer and network applications provides a setting in which to apply the basic analytic concepts and technological tools previously introduced. Classes meet once per week for lectures and once per week for lab sessions. Course work includes weekly written and programming assignments, and midterm and final exams. This course may be used to fulfill the math/computer science portion of the Gen Ed Math/Science requirement. The course does not train students to use application programs such as word processors and Internet browsers.
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Math Methods for Comp Sci COSC-030-10

Credits: 3
Main First Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Tue 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Wed 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Thu 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM

This course, designed to be taken concurrently with COSC-052, covers ...

This course, designed to be taken concurrently with COSC-052, covers mathematical tools and principles that are valuable to the computer scientist. Topics include: propositional and predicate logic; mathematical proofs, including induction; counting and basic probability theory; logarithmic and exponential functions; elementary graph theory; and "Big-O" notation and asymptotics.
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Computer Science I COSC-051-10

Credits: 3
Main First Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Tue 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Wed 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Thu 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM

This course is intended for computer science majors and minors ...

This course is intended for computer science majors and minors, and other students with a serious interest in learning C++ programming. The course covers the following topics: basic data types, the C++ string class, variables and constants, and their declaration, input/output (cin/cout) operators, assignment operators, arithmetic operators, conditional control structures, repetition control structures, basic file operations, user-defined functions, value and reference parameters, scope rules, name precedence, function overloading, template functions, elementary software engineering principles, Standard Template Library (STL), the vector class, elementary searching and sorting, user-defined classes, operator overloading, pointers, self-referential classes, dynamic object creation and destruction, linked lists, and recursion. This course may be used to fulfill the math/computer science portion of the Gen Ed Math/Science requirement. COSC 051 followed by COSC 052 is a major introductory sequence and together complete the General Education requirement for math/science.
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Computer Science I COSC-051-20

Credits: 3
Main Second Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Tue 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Wed 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Thu 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM

This course is intended for computer science majors and minors ...

This course is intended for computer science majors and minors, and other students with a serious interest in learning C++ programming. The course covers the following topics: basic data types, the C++ string class, variables and constants, and their declaration, input/output (cin/cout) operators, assignment operators, arithmetic operators, conditional control structures, repetition control structures, basic file operations, user-defined functions, value and reference parameters, scope rules, name precedence, function overloading, template functions, elementary software engineering principles, Standard Template Library (STL), the vector class, elementary searching and sorting, user-defined classes, operator overloading, pointers, self-referential classes, dynamic object creation and destruction, linked lists, and recursion. This course may be used to fulfill the math/computer science portion of the Gen Ed Math/Science requirement. COSC 051 followed by COSC 052 is a major introductory sequence and together complete the General Education requirement for math/science.
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Computer Science II COSC-052-10

Credits: 3
Main First Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Tue 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Wed 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Thu 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM

This course surveys advanced topics of C++ programming and introductory ...

This course surveys advanced topics of C++ programming and introductory concepts of data structures. It is intended for computer science majors, minors, and other students with a serious interest in learning C++ programming. The course covers the following topics: program organization, pointers, self-referential classes, dynamic object creation and destruction, linked lists, recursion, inheritance, abstract base classes, virtual functions, polymorphism, template classes, exception handling, C-style arrays, bit operations, random file access, big-Oh notation, abstract data types, stacks, queues, deques, lists, vectors, sequences, priority queues, binary trees, binary search trees, elementary graphs, searching, and sorting. This course may be used to fulfill the math/computer science portion of the Gen Ed Math/Science requirement. COSC 051 followed by COSC 052 is a major introductory sequence and together complete the General Education requirement for math/science.
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Computer Science II COSC-052-20

Credits: 3
Main Second Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Tue 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Wed 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Thu 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM

This course surveys advanced topics of C++ programming and introductory ...

This course surveys advanced topics of C++ programming and introductory concepts of data structures. It is intended for computer science majors, minors, and other students with a serious interest in learning C++ programming. The course covers the following topics: program organization, pointers, self-referential classes, dynamic object creation and destruction, linked lists, recursion, inheritance, abstract base classes, virtual functions, polymorphism, template classes, exception handling, C-style arrays, bit operations, random file access, big-Oh notation, abstract data types, stacks, queues, deques, lists, vectors, sequences, priority queues, binary trees, binary search trees, elementary graphs, searching, and sorting. This course may be used to fulfill the math/computer science portion of the Gen Ed Math/Science requirement. COSC 051 followed by COSC 052 is a major introductory sequence and together complete the General Education requirement for math/science.
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Econ Principles Micro ECON-001-10

Credits: 3
Main First Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Tue 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Wed 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Thu 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM

This course first develops simple graphical and mathematical models of ...

This course first develops simple graphical and mathematical models of decision-making by individual economic agents: consumers, workers, and businesses. We analyze interactions between these agents in product and factor markets using concepts of market demand, supply, and equilibrium. Finally, we demonstrate the efficiency of perfectly competitive markets, describe the conditions under which that efficiency arises, and examine market failures that occur when those conditions are not met.
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Econ Principles Micro ECON-001-20

Credits: 3
Main Second Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Tue 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Wed 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Thu 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM

This course first develops simple graphical and mathematical models of ...

This course first develops simple graphical and mathematical models of decision-making by individual economic agents: consumers, workers, and businesses. We analyze interactions between these agents in product and factor markets using concepts of market demand, supply, and equilibrium. Finally, we demonstrate the efficiency of perfectly competitive markets, describe the conditions under which that efficiency arises, and examine market failures that occur when those conditions are not met.
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Econ Principles Macro ECON-002-10

Credits: 3
Main First Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Tue 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Wed 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Thu 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM

This course provides an introduction to macroeconomics. The first part ...

This course provides an introduction to macroeconomics. The first part of the course explores how GDP, inflation, unemployment, and other macroeconomic aggregates are measured in practice. The second part develops analytical models of macroeconomic performance and growth in the long run. The third part focuses on short-run (business-cycle) fluctuations and fiscal and monetary policies.
Fall and Spring.
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Econ Principles Macro ECON-002-20

Credits: 3
Main Second Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Tue 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Wed 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Thu 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM

This course provides an introduction to macroeconomics. The first part ...

This course provides an introduction to macroeconomics. The first part of the course explores how GDP, inflation, unemployment, and other macroeconomic aggregates are measured in practice. The second part develops analytical models of macroeconomic performance and growth in the long run. The third part focuses on short-run (business-cycle) fluctuations and fiscal and monetary policies.
Fall and Spring.
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Intermediate Micro ECON-101-20

Credits: 3
Main Second Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Tue 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Wed 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Thu 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM

This course covers the basic elements of microeconomic theory including ...

This course covers the basic elements of microeconomic theory including consumer choice, the impact on resource allocation of different market structures ranging from competition to monopoly, game theory, general equilibrium analysis, and asymmetric information. We will focus on equilibrium and optimization throughout.
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Intermediate Macro ECON-102-10

Credits: 3
Main First Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Tue 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Wed 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Thu 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM

This course covers the measurement of output and prices, theory ...

This course covers the measurement of output and prices, theory of economic growth, business cycle theory, fiscal policy, monetary policy. Fall and Spring.
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Economic Statistics ECON-121-10

Credits: 3
Main First Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 8:30 AM - 10:30 AM
  • Tue 8:30 AM - 10:30 AM
  • Wed 8:30 AM - 10:30 AM
  • Thu 8:30 AM - 10:30 AM
 
Laboratory
  • Wed 5:30 PM - 7:30 PM

After overviewing descriptive statistics, and the theory of probability and ...

After overviewing descriptive statistics, and the theory of probability and random variables, this course covers statistical inference in detail. Students receive the firm foundation needed for Introduction to Econometrics. Regression analysis, the primary tool for empirical work in economics, is introduced. Electronic data acquisition and computer applications receive hands-on treatment.
Lab sessions meet weekly to discuss homework and the use of computer software. Fall and Spring.
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Intro to Econometrics ECON-122-20

Credits: 3
Main Second Session
Laboratory
Day and Time
  • Wed 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM
 
Lecture
  • Mon 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Tue 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Wed 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Thu 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM

This course develops the theory and applications of regression analysis ...

This course develops the theory and applications of regression analysis, which is the primary tool for empirical work in economics. Emphasis is placed on techniques for estimating economic relationships and testing economic hypotheses. Fall and Spring.
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International Trade ECON-243-10

Credits: 3
Main First Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Tue 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Wed 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Thu 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM

This course covers the theory and practice of international trade ...

This course covers the theory and practice of international trade. The first part of the course develops the classical and modern theories of the determination of the pattern of commodity trade between nations. The second part of the course covers trade policy and the role of institutions in managing world trade. Fall and Spring.
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International Trade ECON-243-20

Credits: 3
Main Second Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Tue 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Wed 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Thu 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM

This course covers the theory and practice of international trade ...

This course covers the theory and practice of international trade. The first part of the course develops the classical and modern theories of the determination of the pattern of commodity trade between nations. The second part of the course covers trade policy and the role of institutions in managing world trade. Fall and Spring.
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International Finance ECON-244-10

Credits: 3
Main First Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Tue 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Wed 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Thu 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM

This course deals with the theory and practice of international ...

This course deals with the theory and practice of international macroeconomics and finance. Concepts of balance of payments and exchange rates are developed, followed by macroeconomic tools in an open economy. Balance of payments adjustments will be analyzed under fixed and flexible exchange rate systems. Macroeconomic topics -- such as inflation, growth, unemployment, the roles of monetary and fiscal policies -- will be discussed using examples from developed and/or developing countries.
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International Finance ECON-244-20

Credits: 3
Main Second Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Tue 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Wed 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Thu 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM

This course deals with the theory and practice of international ...

This course deals with the theory and practice of international macroeconomics and finance. Concepts of balance of payments and exchange rates are developed, followed by macroeconomic tools in an open economy. Balance of payments adjustments will be analyzed under fixed and flexible exchange rate systems. Macroeconomic topics -- such as inflation, growth, unemployment, the roles of monetary and fiscal policies -- will be discussed using examples from developed and/or developing countries.
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Shakespeare ENGL-119-01

Credits: 3
Main Presession
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Tue 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Wed 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Thu 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Fri 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM

Cannot take if successfully completed ENGL 130.

The course will look closely at four of Shakespeare’s ...

The course will look closely at four of Shakespeare’s plays, two comedies (Much Ado About Nothing and The Merchant of Venice) and two tragedies (Hamlet and King Lear). It will focus largely (but not exclusively) on two significant questions: how might these plays have been brought to life by actors on a stage in Shakespeare’s time and how might they continue to be brought to life by actors in our own time. Through the process of seeking answers to those questions the course will hope also to discover what these plays of Shakespeare, on the page and on the stage, might say to us now, some five hundred years after they were written.
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19C American Literature ENGL-153-20

Credits: 3
Main Second Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Tue 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Wed 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Thu 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM

This course will focus primarily on the tension between civilization ...

This course will focus primarily on the tension between civilization and nature in 19th C American literature and culture. In a century when the frontier was progressively colonized and made into spectacle, and when scientific revolutions in natural history created doubt about human exceptionality, nature became a space of both spiritual refuge and hidden menace. As wildness shifted from an exterior landscape to an interior presence, human nature became a source of intense cultural and literary speculation. By tracing a path from transcendentalism to naturalism we will also explore the competing ideas of regeneration and degeneration, of self-definition and loss of identity, of ecstatic connection and destructive mania that inform many literary texts during this century. Among many questions, we will ask: how are American values, particularly individualism, rooted in “self-reliance” and a free-spirited relationship with nature? Why is nature often a source of liberation for individuals and of paranoia for the dominant culture? Why did the performance of privilege during this period entail the construction of gender and racial others as dangerously wild and in need of domestication? How did evolutionary theory haunt the 19th C and influence the rise of naturalism and literary expressions of the grotesque? Students will contribute weekly short responses to a class discussion forum, will lead a class discussion on a relevant topic, and will write a midterm paper and a final paper. Major works to be discussed include, but are not limited to: Thoreau’s Walden, Douglas’s Narrative of the Life, Melville’s Moby Dick, Zitkala-Sa’s American Indian Stories, Chopin’s The Awakening, and Norris’s McTeague.
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19C American Literature ENGL-153-25

Credits: 3
Main Second Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Tue 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Wed 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Thu 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM

This course section is for graduate students only.

This course will focus primarily on the tension between civilization ...

This course will focus primarily on the tension between civilization and nature in 19th C American literature and culture. In a century when the frontier was progressively colonized and made into spectacle, and when scientific revolutions in natural history created doubt about human exceptionality, nature became a space of both spiritual refuge and hidden menace. As wildness shifted from an exterior landscape to an interior presence, human nature became a source of intense cultural and literary speculation. By tracing a path from transcendentalism to naturalism we will also explore the competing ideas of regeneration and degeneration, of self-definition and loss of identity, of ecstatic connection and destructive mania that inform many literary texts during this century. Among many questions, we will ask: how are American values, particularly individualism, rooted in “self-reliance” and a free-spirited relationship with nature? Why is nature often a source of liberation for individuals and of paranoia for the dominant culture? Why did the performance of privilege during this period entail the construction of gender and racial others as dangerously wild and in need of domestication? How did evolutionary theory haunt the 19th C and influence the rise of naturalism and literary expressions of the grotesque? Students will contribute weekly short responses to a class discussion forum, will lead a class discussion on a relevant topic, and will write a midterm paper and a final paper. Major works to be discussed include, but are not limited to: Thoreau’s Walden, Douglas’s Narrative of the Life, Melville’s Moby Dick, Zitkala-Sa’s American Indian Stories, Chopin’s The Awakening, and Norris’s McTeague.
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Science Fiction & Fantasy ENGL-234-20

Credits: 3
Main Second Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Tue 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Wed 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Thu 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM

This course will investigate the concept of the future within ...

This course will investigate the concept of the future within a global cultural imagination, examining a wide range of literary and cinematic genres in science fiction & fantasy. The class will read a short selection from earlier science fiction writers—from H.G. Wells and Isaac Asimov to Arthur C. Clarke and Philip K. Dick—and discuss how speculations of the future have evolved over time. We will address how such classic works speak to contemporary issues about the science of geophysical disasters, the destruction of the environment, financial Armageddon, pandemics and contagions, governmental control and the chilling prospects of nuclear war and global terrorism. Other topics will encompass Afrofuturism, utopia and dystopia, myths and legends, vampires, epic quests in historical and fantasy novels and Japanese anime. Other writers may include Octavia Butler, Ted Chiang, Paul Erdman, Anne Rice, C. S. Lewis and J. R. R. Tolkien.
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Science Fiction & Fantasy ENGL-234-25

Credits: 3
Main Second Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Tue 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Wed 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Thu 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM

This course section is for graduate students only.

This course will investigate the concept of the future within ...

This course will investigate the concept of the future within a global cultural imagination, examining a wide range of literary and cinematic genres in science fiction & fantasy. The class will read a short selection from earlier science fiction writers—from H.G. Wells and Isaac Asimov to Arthur C. Clarke and Philip K. Dick—and discuss how speculations of the future have evolved over time. We will address how such classic works speak to contemporary issues about the science of geophysical disasters, the destruction of the environment, financial Armageddon, pandemics and contagions, governmental control and the chilling prospects of nuclear war and global terrorism. Other topics will encompass Afrofuturism, utopia and dystopia, myths and legends, vampires, epic quests in historical and fantasy novels and Japanese anime. Other writers may include Octavia Butler, Ted Chiang, Paul Erdman, Anne Rice, C. S. Lewis and J. R. R. Tolkien.
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Detective Fiction & Film ENGL-235-10

Credits: 3
Main First Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Tue 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Wed 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Thu 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM

Looking for a genre that is simultaneously and fantastically intellectual ...

Looking for a genre that is simultaneously and fantastically intellectual, fun, and important to current human rights discussions? The solution is elementary, dear Watson - Detective Fiction! On the one hand, all readers of literature and visual media are detectives, training our sights and minds on the evidence we find in characters’ minds and behaviors, details of time and place, and the ideas brought forth by our discoveries in all of these. On the other hand, detective fiction (tv series and film) raises the knowledge stakes in making us aware of how important a keen perception is to active looking, finding, and adding it all up as the Truth or as close to the Truth as we can get. San Francisco detective novelist, Dashiell Hammett wryly observes in The Thin Man, “The problem with putting two and two together is that sometimes you get four, and sometimes you get twenty-two.” Not all detectives perform quite as Bogartian a wit as Hammett’s Sam Spade, but detectives of any time and place are a rather singular breed, empowered by a second sight often blind to their own natures, ranging from theatrical performers to cynical smart alecks to brainy wizards to awkward outsiders to knights errant. Some wield a gun, others yield to the girl (or guy), while still others fascinate with their “little gray cells” or exude a mystique almost as alluring as following the track of their gum shoes in pursuit of evil. Our own game’s afoot as from beneath the fedora, we enjoy clandestine encounters with several detectives, such as the famous Sherlock Holmes and Hercule Poirot, and contemporary lesser known sleuths, such as the British Ellie Miller and the Swedish Saga Norén. The range of investigation this genre provokes is quite amazing, noted here in just a sampling of those questions awaiting your responses in this summer’s crime scenes: To what effect does the genre provoke awareness of borders between or crossing genders, insiders and outsiders, international perspectives and trust? Since many contemporary fictional detectives are police, how does this genre expose the complexity of serving justice, including carefully respecting the suspect’s rights? Why do detective stories stand in for popular culture and political wars as well as brain exercise, historical re-enactment, and ethical catharsis? At least one of the episodes of Sherlock reveals the detective at work in a terrorist attack, and a Norwegian tv series prompts us to study detectives’ responses to the immigrant’s story, even as one of the Truth Terrorist’s attacks is his outrage on behalf of the immigrants. As detectives have become glamorized (as well as “realized”) in fiction and film, what is the significance of drawing attention to the detective as both hero and human? What are the uncanny effects of the Janus-faced relationship between detective and villain? As the home (the familiar, safe, and secure) is often invaded/threatened in this genre, what is the significance of perceiving the detective as an exile, a tourist, or traveler? How are human rights and the detective story comrades in arms? What are the intersections between historical violence and despair and detective fiction? How does the detective story provide a site for indignation, rage, and solace against reality (of injustice and prejudice especially) even as it re-enacts reality? Why is detective fiction FUN?

Novels will include Agatha Christie’s The Murder of Roger Ackroyd, Tana French’s Broken Harbor, and Philip Kerr’s The Lady from Zagreb. Films and TV series include Sherlock, L.A. Confidential, True Detective, Broadchurch, and the Danish original, The Bridge.
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Detective Fiction & Film ENGL-235-15

Credits: 3
Main First Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Tue 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Wed 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Thu 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM

This course section is for graduate students.

Looking for a genre that is simultaneously and fantastically intellectual ...

Looking for a genre that is simultaneously and fantastically intellectual, fun, and important to current human rights discussions? The solution is elementary, dear Watson - Detective Fiction! On the one hand, all readers of literature and visual media are detectives, training our sights and minds on the evidence we find in characters’ minds and behaviors, details of time and place, and the ideas brought forth by our discoveries in all of these. On the other hand, detective fiction (tv series and film) raises the knowledge stakes in making us aware of how important a keen perception is to active looking, finding, and adding it all up as the Truth or as close to the Truth as we can get. San Francisco detective novelist, Dashiell Hammett wryly observes in The Thin Man, “The problem with putting two and two together is that sometimes you get four, and sometimes you get twenty-two.” Not all detectives perform quite as Bogartian a wit as Hammett’s Sam Spade, but detectives of any time and place are a rather singular breed, empowered by a second sight often blind to their own natures, ranging from theatrical performers to cynical smart alecks to brainy wizards to awkward outsiders to knights errant. Some wield a gun, others yield to the girl (or guy), while still others fascinate with their “little gray cells” or exude a mystique almost as alluring as following the track of their gum shoes in pursuit of evil. Our own game’s afoot as from beneath the fedora, we enjoy clandestine encounters with several detectives, such as the famous Sherlock Holmes and Hercule Poirot, and contemporary lesser known sleuths, such as the British Ellie Miller and the Swedish Saga Norén. The range of investigation this genre provokes is quite amazing, noted here in just a sampling of those questions awaiting your responses in this summer’s crime scenes: To what effect does the genre provoke awareness of borders between or crossing genders, insiders and outsiders, international perspectives and trust? Since many contemporary fictional detectives are police, how does this genre expose the complexity of serving justice, including carefully respecting the suspect’s rights? Why do detective stories stand in for popular culture and political wars as well as brain exercise, historical re-enactment, and ethical catharsis? At least one of the episodes of Sherlock reveals the detective at work in a terrorist attack, and a Norwegian tv series prompts us to study detectives’ responses to the immigrant’s story, even as one of the Truth Terrorist’s attacks is his outrage on behalf of the immigrants. As detectives have become glamorized (as well as “realized”) in fiction and film, what is the significance of drawing attention to the detective as both hero and human? What are the uncanny effects of the Janus-faced relationship between detective and villain? As the home (the familiar, safe, and secure) is often invaded/threatened in this genre, what is the significance of perceiving the detective as an exile, a tourist, or traveler? How are human rights and the detective story comrades in arms? What are the intersections between historical violence and despair and detective fiction? How does the detective story provide a site for indignation, rage, and solace against reality (of injustice and prejudice especially) even as it re-enacts reality? Why is detective fiction FUN?

Novels will include Agatha Christie’s The Murder of Roger Ackroyd, Tana French’s Broken Harbor, and Philip Kerr’s The Lady from Zagreb. Films and TV series include Sherlock, L.A. Confidential, True Detective, Broadchurch, and the Danish original, The Bridge.
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War & Terrorism in Pop Culture ENGL-246-20

Credits: 3
Main Second Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Tue 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Wed 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Thu 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM

Cannot take if successfully completed ENGL 291 with Professor Gorman.

How are war and terrorism reimagined and imbricated into popular ...

How are war and terrorism reimagined and imbricated into popular culture? What are the affects of aestheticizing violence? This course will examine the proliferation of artistic forms, which seek to address the issue of war and the attendant concern about terrorism in America by looking at contemporary conflicts and their impact on texts including literature, film, television, video song lyrics and poetry.
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War & Terrorism in Pop Culture ENGL-246-25

Credits: 3
Main Second Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Tue 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Wed 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Thu 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM

This course section is for graduate students only.

How are war and terrorism reimagined and imbricated into popular ...

How are war and terrorism reimagined and imbricated into popular culture? What are the affects of aestheticizing violence? This course will examine the proliferation of artistic forms, which seek to address the issue of war and the attendant concern about terrorism in America by looking at contemporary conflicts and their impact on texts including literature, film, television, video song lyrics and poetry.
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Literature and Technology ENGL-249-130

Credits: 3
Special Session
Distance
Day and Time

This course meets entirely online.

THIS IS AN ONLINE COURSE.

In this course, we will ...

THIS IS AN ONLINE COURSE.

In this course, we will not only explore how digital technology affects reading, but we will also examine technologies of reading, such as close reading, distant reading, and data mining, as strategies for literary interpretation. Our readings will be focused on literary texts that feature machines and artificial intelligence as part of an investigation of what it means to be human. Reading texts like Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, Oscar Wilde’s The Picture of Dorian Gray, and Kazou Ishiguro’s Never Let Me Go, we will pursue the following questions: What does it mean to read? What does it mean to be human? How do writers represent the relationship between reading and humanity? Can literary texts be treated as data, and, if so, what are the implications of such an approach?
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Intro to Cultural Studies ENGL-265-10

Credits: 3
Main First Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Tue 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Wed 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Thu 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM

This course will focus on a history and examination of ...

This course will focus on a history and examination of the set of theories, practices and methodologies which define the field of Cultural Studies. By reading and situating the theory, we can critique the production and consumption of cultural objects, including popular culture and avant garde art. In order to pursue critical analyses of our own in the class, we will interrogate concepts such as culture, ideology, representation, taste, style and subculture, with attention to the specific tensions between language and visual images. Texts will draw from critical and cultural theory, literature, film, video, music and the graphic novel, with a particular emphasis on contemporary artistic modes of expression.
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Fundamentals of Finance FINC-150-10

Credits: 3
Main First Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Tue 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Wed 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Thu 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM

This course is a survey course, designed to explore the ...

This course is a survey course, designed to explore the major concepts in corporate finance. Topics include Time Value of Money; Net Present Value/Internal Rate of Return; Valuation of Stocks and Bonds; Financial Statements/Ratios; Managing Growth; Discounted Cash Flow; Risk, Return and the Cost of Capital; Capital Structure; Dividends; Raising Capital/Going Public; Mergers and Acquisitions; and Corporate Restructuring.

The course focuses on applications of finance to assist students outside the Business School to understand financial statements, apply financial analytical techniques, and learn the basics of the capital markets. Note: students will not be expected to have prior knowledge of course concepts.
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Fundamentals of Finance FINC-150-20

Credits: 3
Main Second Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Tue 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Wed 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Thu 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM

This course is a survey course, designed to explore the ...

This course is a survey course, designed to explore the major concepts in corporate finance. Topics include Time Value of Money; Net Present Value/Internal Rate of Return; Valuation of Stocks and Bonds; Financial Statements/Ratios; Managing Growth; Discounted Cash Flow; Risk, Return and the Cost of Capital; Capital Structure; Dividends; Raising Capital/Going Public; Mergers and Acquisitions; and Corporate Restructuring.

The course focuses on applications of finance to assist students outside the Business School to understand financial statements, apply financial analytical techniques, and learn the basics of the capital markets. Note: students will not be expected to have prior knowledge of course concepts.
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Business Financial Management FINC-211-10

Credits: 3
Main First Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Tue 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Wed 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Thu 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM

This basic course in finance covers the functions of financial ...

This basic course in finance covers the functions of financial managers, financial markets, and financial analysis tools, and corporate financial decision making. It provides an introduction to cost of capital, investment analysis, capital budgeting and the valuation of securities.
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Applied Financial Management FINC-212-20

Credits: 3
Main Second Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Tue 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Wed 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Thu 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM

Visiting students must obtain permission of instructor to register or succcessfully complete FINC-211-10 prior to registering.

This course provides an extensive coverage of corporate finance theory ...

This course provides an extensive coverage of corporate finance theory and the applicability of this theory for the financial manager. Topics include: capital budgeting under uncertainty; the relevance of capital structure decisions on security valuation and riskiness; the theory and practice of dividend policy; implications of financial market efficiency for management; risks and rewards of international financial markets; security valuation including the use of option pricing models; the market for corporate control; risk management through the use of options and future contracts; financial engineering; corporate restructuring and bankruptcy. Cases are used. Prerequisite: Business Financial Management.
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Principles of Investment FINC-241-20

Credits: 3
Main Second Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Tue 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Wed 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Thu 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM

Visiting students and non-MSB students must obtain permission of instructor to registrar.

Course Objective: The objective of this course is to teach ...

Course Objective: The objective of this course is to teach finance students about investment theory and practice. The course will utilize a combination of theoretical studies, problem sets and a portfolio project to teach students about: 1) the structure of the capital markets; 2) theories and practice in portfolio management; 3) asset pricing theories used to analyze securities; 4) equity and debt securities; and 5) derivative instruments. The course will focus primarily on the U.S. markets, although we will touch briefly on international investments. This course will provide students with information and skills needed to succeed in careers in asset management, corporate finance, research, sales or trading.
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Experimental Filmmaking FMST-246-20

Credits: 3
Main Second Session
Seminar
Day and Time
  • Mon 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Tue 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Wed 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Thu 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM

Introductory French I FREN-001-10

Credits: 3
Main First Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 1:00 PM - 2:35 PM
  • Tue 1:00 PM - 2:35 PM
  • Wed 1:00 PM - 2:35 PM
  • Thu 1:00 PM - 2:35 PM
  • Fri 1:00 PM - 2:35 PM

This sequence is intended for students with little or no ...

This sequence is intended for students with little or no previous background in French. Through an audiovisual introduction to French culture, emphasis is placed on the active use of the spoken language with diversified oral and written exercises, dictation, and conversational practice. Required laboratory.
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Introductory French II FREN-002-20

Credits: 3
Main Second Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
  • Tue 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
  • Wed 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
  • Thu 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
  • Fri 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM

This sequence is intended for students with little or no ...

This sequence is intended for students with little or no previous background in French. Through an audiovisual introduction to French culture, emphasis is placed on the active use of the spoken language with diversified oral and written exercises, dictation, and conversational practice. Required laboratory.
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Intermediate French I FREN-021-10

Credits: 3
Main First Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 10:45 AM - 12:20 PM
  • Tue 10:45 AM - 12:20 PM
  • Wed 10:45 AM - 12:20 PM
  • Thu 10:45 AM - 12:20 PM
  • Fri 10:45 AM - 12:20 PM

Intermediate French I (FREN 021) is the continuation of Introductory ...

Intermediate French I (FREN 021) is the continuation of Introductory French II (FREN 002). Students who enroll in this course have typically taken Introductory French II (FREN 002) or have been placed in this course by means of the French Department Placement Test. This course is based on the Intermediate French method “Ensemble” (John Wiley & Sons, Inc.), which consists of a grammar text (with an optional workbook) and a reader. Additional audio-visual material will be provided by the instructor. This course will help you develop and strengthen all four language skills (speaking, listening, reading, and writing) and expand on your every-day vocabulary.

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Intermediate French II FREN-022-20

Credits: 3
Main Second Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 10:45 AM - 12:15 PM
  • Tue 10:45 AM - 12:15 PM
  • Wed 10:45 AM - 12:15 PM
  • Thu 10:45 AM - 12:15 PM
  • Fri 10:45 AM - 12:15 PM

Intermediate French II (FREN 022) is the continuation of Intermediate ...

Intermediate French II (FREN 022) is the continuation of Intermediate French I (FREN 021). Students who enroll in this course have typically taken Intermediate French I (FREN 021) or have been placed in this course by means of the French Department Placement Test. This course is based on the Intermediate French method “Ensemble” (John Wiley & Sons, Inc.), which consists of a grammar text (with an optional workbook) and a reader. Additional audio-visual material will be provided by the instructor. This course will help you develop and strengthen all four language skills (speaking, listening, reading, and writing) and expand on your every-day vocabulary.
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Intro Germ I: Exper Germany GERM-001-10

Credits: 3
Main First Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Tue 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Wed 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Thu 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM

Part I of Level I. The two-course sequence of Level ...

Part I of Level I. The two-course sequence of Level I introduces students to various aspects of the German-speaking world as a way of enabling them to begin building communicative abilities in German in all four language modalities: reading, listening, writing, and speaking. Instruction proceeds from guided to more creative and independent work. The courses incorporate a variety of activities that are based on a range of topics, text types, and different socio-cultural situations. Through diverse collaborative and individual tasks, students begin to find personal forms of expression that are based on these materials. Students learn basic strategies for reading, listening, and writing, and for participating in every-day conversations. In the process they become familiar with and learn to use with some confidence the major sentence patterns and grammatical features of German as well as high-frequency vocabulary of everyday life. Integration of current technology (e.g., the Internet, e-mail, video) familiarizes students with the German-speaking world while at the same time enhancing language learning.
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Intro German II:Exper Germany GERM-002-20

Credits: 3
Main Second Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Tue 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Wed 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Thu 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM

Part 2 of Level I. The two-course sequence of Level ...

Part 2 of Level I. The two-course sequence of Level I introduces students to various aspects of the German-speaking world as a way of enabling them to begin building communicative abilities in German in all four language modalities: reading, listening, writing, and speaking. Instruction proceeds from guided to more creative and independent work. The courses incorporate a variety of activities that are based on a range of topics, text types, and different socio-cultural situations. Through diverse collaborative and individual tasks, students begin to find personal forms of expression that are based on these materials. Students learn basic strategies for reading, listening, and writing, and for participating in every-day conversations. In the process they become familiar with and learn to use with some confidence the major sentence patterns and grammatical features of German as well as high-frequency vocabulary of everyday life. Integration of current technology (e.g., the Internet, e-mail, video) familiarizes students with the German-speaking world while at the same time enhancing language learning.
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Interm German I GERM-021-10

Credits: 3
Main First Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Tue 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Wed 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Thu 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM

Visiting students must take placement test prior to registering.

This course is the first half of the two-part course ...

This course is the first half of the two-part course sequence at Level II. The course is organized topically to familiarize students with contemporary life in the German-speaking world. In Intermediate I, students explore the following themes:

• Where home is: What does “Heimat” mean?
• National pride – a German debate
• From art to kitsch: the cultural city of Vienna

The primary text type that is used at this level to explore each theme is the story, — personal, public and literary stories. Students typically encounter each text first in class and then engage it further out of class in preparation for subsequent in-depth thematic discussions in class. Class discussions often involve role play and/or group work as a way to enhance conversational and negotiating abilities. The course’s emphasis on improving students ability to narrate, compare and contrast, express opinions, and establish causal relationships in speaking and writing lays the groundwork for the historical treatment of stories and histories in Level III.

By the end of the level II students
• will have a good understanding of contemporary life in the German-speaking world with some in-depth knowledge of major social, political and cultural issues;
• will be able to comprehend authentic materials ( video, native speaker conversation) with global comprehension and some fine point knowledge analysis;
• will be able to produce spoken and written discourse from description to narration, to formulation of argument and/or hypothesis, incorporating an increasing variety of style and complexity.
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Interm German II GERM-022-20

Credits: 3
Main Second Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Tue 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Wed 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Thu 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM

Visiting students must take placement test prior to registering.

This course is the second half of the two-part course ...

This course is the second half of the two-part course sequence at Level II. The course is organized topically to familiarize students with contemporary life in the German-speaking world. In Intensive Intermediate, students explore the following themes:
• Nature, people, environment
• Fairy tales
• The German-speaking world from a view of a foreigner
The primary text type that is used at this level to explore each theme is the story, — personal, public and literary stories. Students typically encounter each text first in class and then engage it further out of class in preparation for subsequent in-depth thematic discussions in class. Class discussions often involve role play and/or group work as a way to enhance conversational and negotiating abilities. The course’s emphasis on improving students ability to narrate, compare and contrast, express opinions, and establish causal relationships in speaking and writing lays the groundwork for the historical treatment of stories and histories in Level III.

By the end of the level II students
• will have a good understanding of contemporary life in the German-speaking world with some in-depth knowledge of major social, political and cultural issues;
• will be able to comprehend authentic materials (video, native speaker conversation) with global comprehension and some fine point knowledge analysis;
• will be able to produce spoken and written discourse from description to narration, to formulation of argument and/or hypothesis, incorporating an increasing variety of style and complexity.
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Adv Germ I:Stories & Histories GERM-101-10

Credits: 3
Main First Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Tue 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Wed 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Thu 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM

This course is the first half of the two-part course ...

This course is the first half of the two-part course sequence at Level III. The course is designed to provide students thorough exposure to contemporary historical and social issues in Germany from 1945 to the present. In Advanced I, the students explore the following two themes:

• Germany after 1945: end of war, division of Germany, rebuilding the country
• Two German states (1949-1989)

Drawing on the dual meaning of the German word Geschichte (i.e., history and story), the theme-oriented instructional units in Level III emphasize personal and public stories in German history, while connecting oral narratives with written narratives. Students improve their ability to narrate, compare and contrast and establish causal relationships in speaking and writing. Through the integration of all modalities, this course promotes accuracy, fluency and complexity in language use. The development of advanced reading and writing is considered the primary means for expanding students' language abilities at this level of language instruction.

By the end of Level III, students will
• have an understanding of post-war historical events and of contemporary life in Germany;
• know how to approach authentic materials (television, news programs; videos) and use acquired knowledge to discuss and understand related issues;
• produce paragraph-length dialogue, moving from the personal to the public narrative and to the formulation of argument and critical analysis in a formal setting;
• possess knowledge of phrases necessary to engage in meaningful interactive discussion;
• read non-fiction and literary texts independently;
• improve their writing abilities through regular composition assignments
• possess strategies for vocabulary building and reading.
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Adv Germ II:Stories/Histories GERM-102-20

Credits: 3
Main Second Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Tue 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Wed 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Thu 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM

This course is the second half of the two-part course ...

This course is the second half of the two-part course sequence at Level III. The course is designed to provide students thorough exposure to contemporary historical and social issues in Germany from 1945 to the present. In Advanced II, the students explore the following two themes:

• Fall of the wall and its consequences
• Germany: en route to a multi-cultural society

Drawing on the dual meaning of the German word Geschichte (i.e., history and story), the theme-oriented instructional units in Level III emphasize personal and public stories in German history, while connecting oral narratives with written narratives. Students improve their ability to narrate, compare and contrast and establish causal relationships in speaking and writing. Through the integration of all modalities, this course promotes accuracy, fluency and complexity in language use. The development of advanced reading and writing is considered the primary means for expanding students' language abilities at this level of language instruction.

By the end of Level III, students will
• have an understanding of post-war historical events and of contemporary life in Germany;
• know how to approach authentic materials (television, news programs; videos) and use acquired knowledge to discuss and understand related issues;
• produce paragraph-length dialogue, moving from the personal to the public narrative and to the formulation of argument and critical analysis in a formal setting;
• possess knowledge of phrases necessary to engage in meaningful interactive discussion;
• read non-fiction and literary texts independently;
• improve their writing abilities through regular composition assignments
• possess strategies for vocabulary building and reading.
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US Political Systems GOVT-020-10

Credits: 3
Main First Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Tue 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Wed 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Thu 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM

This course has been renumbered, effective Fall 2014. A student who earned credit for GOVT 008 US Political Systems in a prior term should not enroll and cannot earn credit in this class.

This course is designed to provide students with a broad ...

This course is designed to provide students with a broad understanding of the American political system. The first part of the course addresses the foundations of American politics, particularly the meaning of representative government and the role of elections. The second phase of the course considers the role of important institutions in American government including Congress, the Presidency, the courts, parties, and interest groups. The final section of the course addresses current controversies in public policy including the balance between national security and civil liberties, education reform, and health policy.

This course has been renumbered, effective Fall 2014. A student who earned credit for GOVT 008 US Political Systems in a prior term should not enroll and cannot earn credit in this class.
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US Political Systems GOVT-020-20

Credits: 3
Main Second Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Tue 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Wed 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Thu 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM

This course has been renumbered, effective Fall 2014. A student who earned credit for GOVt 008 US Political Systems in a piror term should not ernoll and cannot earn credit in this course.

This course is designed to provide students with a broad ...

This course is designed to provide students with a broad understanding of the American political system. The first part of the course addresses the foundations of American politics, particularly the meaning of representative government and the role of elections. The second phase of the course considers the role of important institutions in American government including Congress, the Presidency, the courts, parties, and interest groups. The final section of the course addresses current controversies in public policy including the balance between national security and civil liberties, education reform, and health policy.

This course has been renumbered, effective Fall 2014. A student who earned credit for GOVT 008 US Political Systems in a prior term should not enroll and cannot earn credit in this class.
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Comparative Political Systems GOVT-040-10

Credits: 3
Main First Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Tue 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Wed 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Thu 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM

This course has been renumbered, effective Fall 2014. A student who earned credit for GOVT 121 Comparative Political Systems in a prior term should not enroll and cannot earn credit in this class.

This course offers a broad introduction to comparative politics, the ...

This course offers a broad introduction to comparative politics, the subfield of political science concerned mainly with political ideas, institutions, and behavior within states. The course examines such themes as the origins and functions of states, formal institutions such as legislatures and executives, the variety and impact of electoral systems, the nature of democracy and autocracy, internal and external challenges to political order, and the impact of international and domestic factors on state performance. Discussions of theoretical and cross-regional issues will be accompanied by treatment of individual countries and contexts. This course counts for the Comparative Government distribution requirement.

This course has been renumbered, effective Fall 2014. A student who earned credit for GOVT 121 Comparative Political Systems in a prior term should not enroll and cannot earn credit in this class.
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Comparative Political Systems GOVT-040-20

Credits: 3
Main Second Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Tue 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Wed 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Thu 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM

This course has been renumbered, effective Fall 2014. A studeht who earned credif for GOVT 121 Comparative Political Systems in a prior term should not enroll and cannot earn credit in this class.

This course offers a broad introduction to comparative politics, the ...

This course offers a broad introduction to comparative politics, the subfield of political science concerned mainly with political ideas, institutions, and behavior within states. The course examines such themes as the origins and functions of states, formal institutions such as legislatures and executives, the variety and impact of electoral systems, the nature of democracy and autocracy, internal and external challenges to political order, and the impact of international and domestic factors on state performance. Discussions of theoretical and cross-regional issues will be accompanied by treatment of individual countries and contexts. This course counts for the Comparative Government distribution requirement.

This course has been renumbered, effective Fall 2014. A student who earned credit for GOVT 121 Comparative Political Systems in a prior term should not enroll and cannot earn credit in this class.
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International Relations GOVT-060-10

Credits: 3
Main First Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 8:30 AM - 10:30 AM
  • Tue 8:30 AM - 10:30 AM
  • Wed 8:30 AM - 10:30 AM
  • Thu 8:30 AM - 10:30 AM

This course has been renumbered, effective Fall 2014. A student who earned credit in GOVT 006 International Relations in a prior term should not enroll and cannot earn credit in this class.

This course is a broad introduction to the key theories ...

This course is a broad introduction to the key theories, concepts, and issues in international relations. It begins with a overview of the leading theoretical approaches to understanding international relations and then uses these frameworks to understand historical and contemporary events and issues, including international political economy, energy trade, the global environment, weapons of mass destruction, ethnic and civil conflicts, and terrorism. This course counts for the International Relations distribution requirement.

This course has been renumbered, effective Fall 2014. A student who earned credit for GOVT 006 International Relations in a prior term should not enroll and cannot earn credit in this class.
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International Relations GOVT-060-20

Credits: 3
Main Second Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 8:30 AM - 10:30 AM
  • Tue 8:30 AM - 10:30 AM
  • Wed 8:30 AM - 10:30 AM
  • Thu 8:30 AM - 10:30 AM

This course has been renumbered, effective Fall 2014. A student who earned credit in GOVT 006 International Relations in a prior term should not enroll and cannot earn credit in this class.

This course is a broad introduction to the key theories ...

This course is a broad introduction to the key theories, concepts, and issues in international relations. It begins with a overview of the leading theoretical approaches to understanding international relations and then uses these frameworks to understand historical and contemporary events and issues, including international political economy, energy trade, the global environment, weapons of mass destruction, ethnic and civil conflicts, and terrorism. This course counts for the International Relations distribution requirement.

This course has been renumbered, effective Fall 2014. A student who earned credit for GOVT 006 International Relations in a prior term should not enroll and cannot earn credit in this class.
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International Relations GOVT-060-21

Credits: 3
Main Second Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Tue 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Wed 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Thu 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM

This course has been renumbered, effective Fall 2014. A student who has earned credit in GOVT 006 International Relations in a prior term should not enroll and cannot earn credits in this class.

This course is a broad introduction to the key theories ...

This course is a broad introduction to the key theories, concepts, and issues in international relations. It begins with a overview of the leading theoretical approaches to understanding international relations and then uses these frameworks to understand historical and contemporary events and issues, including international political economy, energy trade, the global environment, weapons of mass destruction, ethnic and civil conflicts, and terrorism. This course counts for the International Relations distribution requirement.

This course has been renumbered, effective Fall 2014. A student who earned credit for GOVT 006 International Relations in a prior term should not enroll and cannot earn credit in this class.
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Elements of Political Theory GOVT-080-10

Credits: 3
Main First Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Tue 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Wed 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Thu 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM

This course has been renumbered, effective Fall 2014. A student who has earned credit in GOVT 117 Elements of Political Theory should not enroll and cannot earn credit in this class.

The principal aim of this course is to provide an ...

The principal aim of this course is to provide an introduction to the field of political philosophy. The texts to be read are among the most important works in the field covering a period of twenty-four hundred years. In order to give a comprehensive overview of the history of political thought, we will be studying works written by Plato, Aristotle, Machiavelli, Locke, the authors of the Federalist Essays, and Marx. Each of these thinkers presents a different perspective concerning the best manner in which politics ought to be practiced. It is hoped that a thorough reading and comprehension of these works will (1) familiarize the student with the general concerns of political thought, (2) demonstrate that political thought is an ongoing dialogue among thinkers from various times and historical circumstances, and (3) suggest that some of the concerns that confronted philosophers centuries ago are still relevant to the problems of today.

This course has been renumbered, effective Fall 2014. A student who earned credit for GOVT 117 Elements of Political Theory in a prior term should not enroll and cannot earn credit in this class.
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Constitutional Law I GOVT-231-10

Credits: 3
Main First Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Tue 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Wed 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Thu 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM

A study of the American Constitution in the light of ...

A study of the American Constitution in the light of judicial interpretation. Utilizing the case law approach, major decisions of the Supreme Court are analyzed and discussed. Basic constitutional principles controlling the exercise of governmental power in the political system are examined. Special consideration is given to the rulings and doctrines of the Court in the field of political and civil liberties.

This course counts for the American Government distribution requirement.
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Presidntial Rhetoric GOVT-336-10

Credits: 3
Main First Session
Seminar
Day and Time
  • Mon 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Tue 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Wed 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Thu 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM

This course explores the economic and social challenges facing large ...

This course explores the economic and social challenges facing large US cities since roughly 1965 as well as the cities' political responses. Its major topics include the changing relations between racial and ethnic groups, the political impact of suburbanization, and the political effects of deindustrialization and economic transformation. The course readings are drawn from recent urban political history and sociology as well as political science. The course pays special attention to the changing distribution of political and economic power in US metropolitan areas, and considers regional coordination and other potential policy responses.
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Politics & Film GOVT-432-10

Credits: 3
Main First Session
Seminar
Day and Time
  • Mon 6:00 PM - 8:30 PM
  • Tue 6:00 PM - 8:30 PM
  • Wed 6:00 PM - 8:30 PM
  • Thu 6:00 PM - 8:30 PM

The important and long-standing interplay between politics and film is ...

The important and long-standing interplay between politics and film is the focus of this course. Three general questions characterize this examination. First, what ideological, chronological, or cultural differences mark different films focusing on a common political object, such as the American Dream or war? What accounts for these differences? Second, how political is an individual movie? How expansive should the definition of political content be? Third, how effective is the specific genre in conveying the intended political message? Are propaganda films really more effective than the indirect messages found in mainstream blockbusters?
We begin with a general overview of the film-politics relationship and a brief discussion of the various perspectives and theories that illuminate the connection. Next, we look at the most obvious political films: the propaganda movies Triumph of the Will and Birth of a Nation. Next we look at the documentary genre through a contemporary production Paragraph 175 and a classic, Wiseman’s Titicut Follies. A discussion of political satire follows, focused on Chaplin’s Great Dictator and South Park: Bigger, Longer and Uncut. The next section delves into Hollywood’s image of America and American politics. The first two films revolve around the presentation of the American Dream, exemplified by Citizen Kane, and Forrest Gump, movies separated by 50 years. Then we look at the more focused theme of the image of Washington politics through Capra’s classic Mr. Smith Goes to Washington and Wag the Dog.
On a different note, we discuss one of the most unexpectedly political films, Dangerous Liaisons, a study in political personality, power maximization and unadulterated competition. The last section thematizes war and genocide. In contrast to typical heroic representations of WWII, we look at a Japanese animated feature, Grave of the Fireflies, which reveals a substantially different cultural and political sensibility, as well as the Oscar-winning glimpse of Hitler’s last days, Downfall. For the Cold War we will analyze The Manchurian Candidate and From Russia with Love. Next comes The Deer Hunter, a masterpiece that best captures the pervasive malaise of the Vietnam War period, both at home and at the front. The final films delve into an historical theme with great contemporary political and ethical relevance: the Holocaust as depicted in Spielberg’s Schindler’s List and Holland’s Europa, Europa.
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Dept Sem:Third World Politics GOVT-452-20

Credits: 3
Main Second Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Tue 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Wed 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Thu 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM

This course has been renumbered, effective Fall 2014. A student who has earned credit in GOVT 404 Third World Politics in a prior term should not enroll and cannot earn credit in this class.

This course engages four major themes in “Third World” Politics ...

This course engages four major themes in “Third World” Politics. For historical perspective on current concerns we begin with the literature on colonialism and the state. The second part of the course addresses democracy and democratization. The third part of the course explores persistent authoritarianism in the Middle East and North Africa in light of the concepts, theories, and propositions in the democratization literature. Part four turns to socioeconomic development in the Third World. The major focus is on the role of the state in Late Developers. In conclusion, we turn to student research on the Politics of the Third World.
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Negotiating MIddle East Peace GOVT-472-20

Credits: 3
Main Second Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Tue 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Wed 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Thu 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM

This course has been renumbered, effective Fall 2014. A student who has earned credit for GOVT 448 Negotiating Middle East Peace in a prior term should not enroll and cannot earn credit for this class.

Many people have the intuition that distributive justice requires a ...

Many people have the intuition that distributive justice requires a presumption in favor of equality in the distribution of economic goods. Others disagree, and insist that the link between justice and equality has been much exaggerated. But even those who share the intuition often disagree about the sort of equality that is required. This seminar explores these debates, with particular attention to the work of such theorists as Hayek, Rawls, Frankfurt, Nozick, Dworkin, and G.A. Cohen.
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DeptSem:Amer Political Culture GOVT-496-10

Credits: 3
Main First Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Tue 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Wed 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Thu 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM

This course has been renumbered effective Summer 2015. A student who earned credit in GOVT 475 "American Political Culture" in a prior term should not enroll and cannot earn credits in this class.

There are a variety of theoretical models for resolving conflict ...

There are a variety of theoretical models for resolving conflict and establishing post-conflict justice, but which actually work in the field? Furthermore conflict resolution theory, various peacemaking approaches, and transitional justice are often lumped together into a single, all-encompassing field: what distinguishes different approaches? This class (GOVT 496-01) evaluates such models, including the “responsibility to rebuild” doctrine and U.S. government frameworks for reconstruction and stabilization, with particular attention given to the efforts of religious actors engaged in peacebuilding. Over the course of the semester, students will interview foreign policy experts, in and out of government, on the elements of peacebuilding. In addition to their individual research projects, they will publish their findings in a Doyle Undergraduate Fellows Report at the end of the semester. >> more
Through an examination of critical case studies and original research organized around student interviews with government and NGO experts, we will address the following questions: What are the tools available to policymakers and activists to engage diverse societal groups around the world in pursuit of peace, human rights, and the rule of law? To which models (e.g. transitional justice, conflict resolution, just peacebuilding) do diplomats and civil society turn at war’s end? What are the normative commitments of each of these schools? How have those tools been applied in specific cases, and to what effect? How might they be improved into the future? A special focus of the course will be on the efforts of religious actors engaged in peacebuilding. Some have argued that religious actors and institutions have unique advantages in working for peace: they are trusted institutions embedded in their community, they adhere to an explicit and respected set of values, they have a particular warrant for opposing injustice, and they have an unrivaled ability to mobilize people-locally and transnationally-in favor of specific ideas. Others claim that question the effectiveness in the field of faith-based and NGO-based approaches to peace.

Over the course of the semester, students will interview security and peace experts, in and out of government, on approaches to peacebuilding that work. In addition to their individual research projects, they will publish their findings in a Berkley Center Undergraduate Fellows Report at the end of the semester.

In order to combine individual accountability with a collaborative research project, the syllabus will carefully lay out expectations, including traditional course readings, class discussion, and several short papers. Each student is expected to contribute background research, interviews, writing, and editing to the final research product.
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Intro Early Hist:World I HIST-007-10

Credits: 3
Main First Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 10:45 AM - 12:20 PM
  • Tue 10:45 AM - 12:20 PM
  • Wed 10:45 AM - 12:20 PM
  • Thu 10:45 AM - 12:20 PM
  • Fri 10:45 AM - 12:20 PM

The core requirement in History for COLLEGE students is as follows: 1 HIST Focus course: HIST 099, any section. 1 introductory History survey: 007, 008, 106, 107, 111, 112, 128, 129, 158, 159, 160, or 161. Note that students who receive AP or IB credit for History CANNOT take HIST 007, 008, or 099 for credit.

HIST 007 Intro Early History: World I or Europe I ...

HIST 007 Intro Early History: World I or Europe I
For College students in the Class of 2017 and beyond, all sections of HIST 007 or HIST 008 fulfill the core requirement in History for a broad introductory survey; these students complete the requirement by taking HIST 099.
The College Class of 2016 may elect still to follow the old core requirement in History (for which consult the College deans or the History undergraduate director).
Please note that if you receive AP/IB placement or credit, you cannot take HIST 007 (or 008 or 099) for credit.
The various sections of HIST 007 have different focuses, for which see below; moreover, each instructor may develop or stress particular themes within her/his focus. Students are urged to consult syllabi available on line or at the History Department.

The World I sections examine the history of the human experience from a global perspective. The bulk of the semester concerns societies and states from the time of ancient civilizations to about 1500 AD. The course pays particular attention to political, economic, and social changes, but also considers cultural, technological, and ecological history. The evolving relationship between human identities and their social and material environments forms one of the major points of analytical focus for this course. The overarching goal is to provide a general framework for the history of the world to help students understand the big picture, and to help them to contextualize what they will later study about history, politics, religion--in short, about the human experience.

The Europe I sections offer an analysis of the major political, social, economic, diplomatic, religious, intellectual, and scientific developments in European Civilization to 1789.
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Intro Early Hist: Europe I HIST-007-11

Credits: 3
Main First Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 3:15 PM - 4:50 PM
  • Tue 3:15 PM - 4:50 PM
  • Wed 3:15 PM - 4:50 PM
  • Thu 3:15 PM - 4:50 PM
  • Fri 3:15 PM - 4:50 PM

The core requirement in History for COLLEGE students is as follows: 1 HIST Focus course: HIST 099, any section. 1 introductory History survey: 007, 008, 106, 107, 111, 112, 128, 129, 158, 159, 160, or 161. Note that students who receive AP or IB credit for History CANNOT take HIST 007, 008, or 099 for credit.

HIST 007 Intro Early History: World I or Europe I ...

HIST 007 Intro Early History: World I or Europe I
For College students in the Class of 2017 and beyond, all sections of HIST 007 or HIST 008 fulfill the core requirement in History for a broad introductory survey; these students complete the requirement by taking HIST 099.
The College Class of 2016 may elect still to follow the old core requirement in History (for which consult the College deans or the History undergraduate director).
Please note that if you receive AP/IB placement or credit, you cannot take HIST 007 (or 008 or 099) for credit.
The various sections of HIST 007 have different focuses, for which see below; moreover, each instructor may develop or stress particular themes within her/his focus. Students are urged to consult syllabi available on line or at the History Department.

The World I sections examine the history of the human experience from a global perspective. The bulk of the semester concerns societies and states from the time of ancient civilizations to about 1500 AD. The course pays particular attention to political, economic, and social changes, but also considers cultural, technological, and ecological history. The evolving relationship between human identities and their social and material environments forms one of the major points of analytical focus for this course. The overarching goal is to provide a general framework for the history of the world to help students understand the big picture, and to help them to contextualize what they will later study about history, politics, religion--in short, about the human experience.

The Europe I sections offer an analysis of the major political, social, economic, diplomatic, religious, intellectual, and scientific developments in European Civilization to 1789.
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Intro Late Hist: World II HIST-008-20

Credits: 3
Main Second Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 10:45 AM - 12:15 PM
  • Tue 10:45 AM - 12:15 PM
  • Wed 10:45 AM - 12:15 PM
  • Thu 10:45 AM - 12:15 PM
  • Fri 10:45 AM - 12:15 PM

The core requirement in History for COLLEGE students is as follows: 1 HIST Focus course: HIST 099, any section. 1 introductory History survey: 007, 008, 106, 107, 111, 112, 128, 129, 158, 159, 160, or 161. Note that students who receive AP or IB credit for History CANNOT take HIST 007, 008, or 099 for credit.

HIST 008 Intro Late History: World II or Europe II ...

HIST 008 Intro Late History: World II or Europe II
For College students in the Class of 2017 and beyond, all sections of HIST 007 or HIST 008 fulfill the core requirement in History for a broad introductory survey; these students complete the requirement by taking HIST 099.
The College Class of 2016 may elect still to follow the old core requirement in History (for which consult the College deans or the History undergraduate director).
Please note that if you receive AP/IB placement or credit, you cannot take HIST 007 (or 008 or 099) for credit.
The various sections of HIST 008 have different focuses, for which see below; moreover, each instructor may develop or stress particular themes within her/his focus. Students are urged to consult syllabi available on line or at the History Department.

The World II sections consider human history since about 1500 AD, focusing on the dynamics of global interaction. The class seeks to familiarize students with, and help them contextualize, historical processes and phenomena such as colonialism and imperialism, industrialization, modern population growth, nationalism and the rise of the nation-state, great power politics, and the emergence of modern science. Its goal is to explain how the world got to be the way it is, with a particular focus on how social and ethno-cultural identities have been shaped--and have in turn shaped--political, economic, and physical environments.

The Europe II sections offer an analysis of the significant political, social, economic, diplomatic, religious, intellectual, and scientific developments in European Civilization since the eruption of the French Revolution. Special attention is also paid to issues of class, gender, marginality and the relationship of Europe to non-Western cultures.
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Intro Late Hist: Europe II HIST-008-21

Credits: 3
Main Second Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 3:15 PM - 4:45 PM
  • Tue 3:15 PM - 4:45 PM
  • Wed 3:15 PM - 4:45 PM
  • Thu 3:15 PM - 4:45 PM
  • Fri 3:15 PM - 4:45 PM

The core requirement in History for COLLEGE students is as follows: 1 HIST Focus course: HIST 099, any section. 1 introductory History survey: 007, 008, 106, 107, 111, 112, 128, 129, 158, 159, 160, or 161. Note that students who receive AP or IB credit for History CANNOT take HIST 007, 008, or 099 for credit.

HIST 008 Intro Late History: World II or Europe II ...

HIST 008 Intro Late History: World II or Europe II
For College students in the Class of 2017 and beyond, all sections of HIST 007 or HIST 008 fulfill the core requirement in History for a broad introductory survey; these students complete the requirement by taking HIST 099.
The College Class of 2016 may elect still to follow the old core requirement in History (for which consult the College deans or the History undergraduate director).
Please note that if you receive AP/IB placement or credit, you cannot take HIST 007 (or 008 or 099) for credit.
The various sections of HIST 008 have different focuses, for which see below; moreover, each instructor may develop or stress particular themes within her/his focus. Students are urged to consult syllabi available on line or at the History Department.

The World II sections consider human history since about 1500 AD, focusing on the dynamics of global interaction. The class seeks to familiarize students with, and help them contextualize, historical processes and phenomena such as colonialism and imperialism, industrialization, modern population growth, nationalism and the rise of the nation-state, great power politics, and the emergence of modern science. Its goal is to explain how the world got to be the way it is, with a particular focus on how social and ethno-cultural identities have been shaped--and have in turn shaped--political, economic, and physical environments.

The Europe II sections offer an analysis of the significant political, social, economic, diplomatic, religious, intellectual, and scientific developments in European Civilization since the eruption of the French Revolution. Special attention is also paid to issues of class, gender, marginality and the relationship of Europe to non-Western cultures.
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Atlantic World HIST-106-20

Credits: 3
Main Second Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
  • Tue 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
  • Wed 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
  • Thu 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
  • Fri 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM

The core requirement in History for COLLEGE students is as follows: 1 HIST Focus course: HIST 099, any section. 1 introductory History survey: 007, 008, 106, 107, 111, 112, 128, 129, 158, 159, 160, or 161. Note that students who receive AP or IB credit for History CANNOT take HIST 007, 008, or 099 for credit. Until Fall 2014 HIST 106 used to be one of the options within HIST 007; if you took HIST 107 Intro Early Hist: Atlantic World, you should not take HIST 106.

For College students all sections of HIST 106 fulfill the ...

For College students all sections of HIST 106 fulfill the core requirement in History for a broad introductory survey; these students complete the requirement by taking HIST 099.

Atlantic World draws together the histories of four continents, Europe, Africa, North America, and South America, to investigate the new Atlantic world created as a consequence of the Columbian encounter in 1492. The class traces the creation of this world from the first European forays in the Atlantic and on the coast of Africa in the fifteenth century to the first wars for colonial independence and the abolition of slavery. Topics include the destruction and reconfiguration of indigenous societies; the crucial labor migrations of Europeans, Native Americans, and Africans; and the various strategies of accommodation, resistance, and rebellion demonstrated by the many different inhabitants of the Americas.

Please note that until Fall 2014 HIST 106 used to be one of the options within HIST 007; if you took HIST 007 Intro Early Hist: Atlantic World, you should NOT take HIST 106.
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Pacific World HIST-107-10

Credits: 3
Main First Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 1:00 PM - 2:35 PM
  • Tue 1:00 PM - 2:35 PM
  • Wed 1:00 PM - 2:35 PM
  • Thu 1:00 PM - 2:35 PM
  • Fri 1:00 PM - 2:35 PM

The core requirement in History of COLLEGE students is as follows: 1 HIST Focus course: HIST 099, any section. 1 Introductory History survey: 007, 008, 106, 107, 111, 112, 128, 158, 159, 160, or 161. Note that students who receive AP or IB credit in Hisotyr CANNOT take HIST 007, 008, or 099 for credit. Until Spring 2015 HIST 107 used to be one of the options within HIST 008; if you took HIST 008 Intro Early Hist: Pacific World, you should NOT take HIST 107.

For College students all sections of HIST 107 fulfill the ...

For College students all sections of HIST 107 fulfill the core requirement in History for a broad introductory survey; these students complete the requirement by taking HIST 099.

Please note that until Spring 2015 HIST 107 used to be one of the options within HIST 008; if you took HIST 008 Intro Late Hist: Pacific World, you should NOT take HIST 107.

Pacific World focuses on the Pacific Ocean world, which has historically been regarded as a vast and prohibitive void rather than an avenue for integration. Yet over the last five centuries motions of people, commodities, and capital have created important relationships between the diverse societies situated on the "Pacific Rim." This course examines the history of trans-Pacific interactions from 1500 to the present. It takes the ocean itself as the principal framework of analysis in order to bring into focus large-scale processes--migration, imperial expansion, cross-cultural trade, transfers of technology, cultural and religious exchange, and warfare and diplomacy. This "oceans connect" approach to world history brings these processes into sharp relief while also allowing for attention to the extraordinary diversity of cultures located within and around the Pacific.
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The Islamic World HIST-109-10

Credits: 3
Main First Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 1:00 PM - 2:35 PM
  • Tue 1:00 PM - 2:35 PM
  • Wed 1:00 PM - 2:35 PM
  • Thu 1:00 PM - 2:35 PM
  • Fri 1:00 PM - 2:35 PM

This course will examine the history of the Islamic world ...

This course will examine the history of the Islamic world from its origins to the present. It is multi-regional in its coverage, examining the development of Muslim societies from sub-Saharan Africa to southeast Asia as they became part of the global community of the Islamic world. Attention will be given to the interaction between the shared Islamic identity and the distinctive local expressions of Muslim faith and life. Political, legal, social, artistic, and cultural dimensions of the Islamic historical experience will be discussed.
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Africa I HIST-111-20

Credits: 3
Main Second Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 8:30 AM - 10:30 AM
  • Tue 8:30 AM - 10:30 AM
  • Wed 8:30 AM - 10:30 AM
  • Thu 8:30 AM - 10:30 AM

The core requirement in History for COLLEGE students is as follows: 1 HIST Focus course: HIST-099, any section 1 introductory History survey: 007, 008, 106, 107, 111, 112, 128, 129, 158, 159, 160, or 161. Notes that students who receive AP or IB credit in History CANNOT take HIST 007, 008, or 099 for credit.

This course is a general survey and explores the rich ...

This course is a general survey and explores the rich history of people living in Africa from very early times through the 19th century. We will focus our attention on several regional case studies, including the Nile River kingdoms, Ethiopia, the forest states of West Africa, the equatorial societies, kingdoms of the southern savannas, the Swahili coast and its hinterland in eastern and central Africa, the Kongo Kingdom and Atlantic slave trade, and many others. We seek to understand transformations common to early human histories, such as the emergence of food production or the rise of centralized states, as well as the situational and contingent nature of ethnicity, slavery, gender, and wealth and poverty in the African context. We will also consider social achievements particular to Africans’ history, such as the multiple inventions of heterarchical forms of governance. We will study how persistent ideas from western cultures shaped what outsiders thought they knew about Africans and their histories at the same time that we try to understand what Africans themselves thought about their own actions and those of their ancestors. We will access these histories by analyzing a range of primary historical sources: archaeological artifacts and site reports, travelers’ accounts, art, oral traditions, photographs, the reconstructed vocabulary of dead languages, and many others.

For College students in the Class of 2017 and beyond, HIST 111 fulfills the core requirement in History for a broad introductory survey; these students complete the requirement by taking HIST 099.
The College Class of 2016 may elect still to follow the old core requirement in History (for which consult the College deans or the History undergraduate director).
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Modern Germany HIST-139-01

Credits: 3
Main Presession
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Tue 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Wed 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Thu 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Fri 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM

The twentieth century was one of the most tumultuous periods ...

The twentieth century was one of the most tumultuous periods of the modern era. Two world wars resulted in unprecedented death and destruction while a third, “cold” war pushed humanity to the brink of self-annihilation. While the major conflicts of the twentieth century were global affairs, some countries informed the course of events more than others.
Germany was one of the most dominant players on the twentieth-century stage. From its establishment in the late nineteenth century the modern German state struggled to define itself both at home and abroad. This struggle endured throughout the twentieth century and spilled more than once beyond the country’s borders. In 1914 and again in 1939 Germany’s search for definition helped draw the world into total war. After 1945 the war-torn nation quickly found itself at the center of another global conflict: the Cold War. For almost thirty years the Berlin Wall marked not only the division of Germany but the frontline of the standoff between the East and the West. Since the end of the Cold War Germany’s influence on the European and international stages has remained stronger than ever. The nation is one of the world’s leading exporters, a vital member of both the North Atlantic Treaty Organization and the Group of Twenty (G-20), and a political, economic, and cultural bellwether in unified Europe. In light of Germany’s historic global influence, it is impossible to appreciate the developments of the last one hundred years without an understanding of twentieth-century German history. It is to this point that this course responds.

Through lectures, discussions, and films the course explores the major political, economic, and cultural developments that shaped the German experience in the twentieth century. It begins with the unification of the German territories in 1871 and progresses through the Wilhelmine period, the Weimar Republic, the Third Reich, the postwar occupation, the Cold War, reunification, and the first decade of the twenty-first century (including the 2014 World Cup!). It outlines the German past with an eye toward broader international developments, such as the Cold War, European integration, and globalization.
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Latin America I HIST-158-10

Credits: 3
Main First Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 8:30 AM - 10:05 AM
  • Tue 8:30 AM - 10:05 AM
  • Wed 8:30 AM - 10:05 AM
  • Thu 8:30 AM - 10:05 AM
  • Fri 8:30 AM - 10:05 AM

The core requirement in History for COLLEGE students is as follows: 1 HIST Focus course: HIST 099, any section. 1 introductory History survey: 007, 008, 106, 107, 111, 112, 128, 129, 158, 159, 160, or 161. Note that students who receive AP or IB credit for History CANNOT take HIST 007, 008, or 099 for credit.

Beginning with a survey of the diverse societies of the ...

Beginning with a survey of the diverse societies of the Americas before 1500, this classes focuses on the coming of Europeans, the deadly impact of the disease they brought, and the integration of the hemisphere into European empires and a new global economy during three subsequent centuries. We will emphasize how the long state-organized peoples of regions subjected to Spanish rule adapted socially and culturally to sustain silver as a key global commodity; we will explore how Africans were dragged in bondage to Atlantic America to labor in booming sugar economies ruled by every European power: Portugal, Britain, France, Spain, and more. The interactions among Europeans and the diverse peoples who produced everything focus much of the analysis—culminating in the rising resistance that challenged Europeans in regions from the Andes to Haiti in the late eighteenth century.

For College students in the Class of 2017 and beyond, HIST 158 fulfills the core requirement in History for a broad introductory survey; these students complete the requirement by taking HIST 099.
The College Class of 2016 may elect still to follow the old core requirement in History (for which consult the College deans or the History undergraduate director).
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Latin America II HIST-159-20

Credits: 3
Main Second Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM
  • Tue 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM
  • Wed 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM
  • Thu 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM
  • Fri 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM

The core requirement in History for COLLEGE students is as follows: 1 HIST Focus course: HIST 099, any section. 1 introductory History survey: 007, 008, 106, 107, 111, 112, 128, 129, 158, 159, 160, or 161. Note that students who receive AP or IB credit for History CANNOT take HIST 007, 008, or 099 for credit.

This course explores the period from independence to the present ...

This course explores the period from independence to the present. The course is divided into three sections. First, it discusses some of the salient issues of the nineteenth century in a thematic format, such as frontier societies, the role of the peasants, and the phenomenon of caudillismo. The second section provides an overview of the national political histories of most Latin American countries, whereas the third section returns to a thematic forma, providing analysis of important topics such as the role of women, U.S.-Latin American relations, structural adjustment policies, and the drug trade. The course uses as examples the lives of ordinary and extraordinary Latin Americans to illustrate the analysis.

For College students in the Class of 2017 and beyond, HIST 159 fulfills the core requirement in History for a broad introductory survey; these students complete the requirement by taking HIST 099.
The College Class of 2016 may elect still to follow the old core requirement in History (for which consult the College deans or the History undergraduate director).
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Middle East I HIST-160-10

Credits: 3
Main First Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 3:15 PM - 4:50 PM
  • Tue 3:15 PM - 4:50 PM
  • Wed 3:15 PM - 4:50 PM
  • Thu 3:15 PM - 4:50 PM
  • Fri 3:15 PM - 4:50 PM

The core requirement in History for COLLEGE students is as follows: 1 HIST Focus course: HIST 099, any section. 1 introductory History survey: 007, 008, 106, 107, 111, 112, 128, 129, 158, 159, 160, or 161. Note that students who receive AP or IB credit for History CANNOT take HIST 007, 008, or 099 for credit.

Through lectures, readings, class discussion and audio-visual material, this course ...

Through lectures, readings, class discussion and audio-visual material, this course examines the history of the Middle East from the late sixth to the late seventeenth centuries. The lectures focus on broader topics, such as the emergence of Islam; the history of major Middle Eastern empires; changing geo-strategic and cultural conditions; and the evolution and functioning of classical and medieval Muslim institutions. Discussion sections will enable students to deepen their knowledge regarding local diversities within the unifying systems of Muslim beliefs, law, and administration; the material and intellectual exchanges and interactions between the Muslim world and non-Muslim communities and polities; and Muslim reactions to the Crusades and the Mongol invasions.

For College students in the Class of 2017 and beyond, HIST 160 fulfills the core requirement in History for a broad introductory survey; these students complete the requirement by taking HIST 099.
The College Class of 2016 may elect still to follow the old core requirement in History (for which consult the College deans or the History undergraduate director).
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Middle East II HIST-161-20

Credits: 3
Main Second Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 3:15 PM - 4:45 PM
  • Tue 3:15 PM - 4:45 PM
  • Wed 3:15 PM - 4:45 PM
  • Thu 3:15 PM - 4:45 PM
  • Fri 3:15 PM - 4:45 PM

The core requirement in History for COLLEGE students is as follows: 1 HIST Focus course: HIST 099, any section. 1 introductory History survey: 007, 008, 106, 107, 111, 112, 128, 129, 158, 159, 160, or 161. Note that students who receive AP or IB credit for History CANNOT take HIST 007, 008, or 099 for credit.

The course outlines the factors that have shaped the political ...

The course outlines the factors that have shaped the political and social features of the modern Middle East from 1500 to the present. Its geographic scope comprises the central provinces and territories of the former Ottoman and Safavid empires: Turkey, Iraq, Syria, Palestine, Egypt, Arabia, and Iran. The syllabus emphasizes three analytical themes: first, the historical evolution of "Middle Eastern" polities from dynastic and religious empires in the 16th century to modern "nation-states" in the 20th; second, the impact of industrial capitalism and European imperial expansion on local societies and their modes of production; and third, the socio-cultural and ideological dimensions of these large-scale transformations, specifically the rise of mass ideologies of liberation and development (nationalism, socialism, rights movements, political Islam), and the emergence of structural and social imbalances (economic polarization, cultural/ethnic conflicts, demographic growth, urbanization).

For College students in the Class of 2017 and beyond, HIST 161 fulfills the core requirement in History for a broad introductory survey; these students complete the requirement by taking HIST 099.
The College Class of 2016 may elect still to follow the old core requirement in History (for which consult the College deans or the History undergraduate director).
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Intensive Basic Italian ITAL-011-10

Credits: 6
Main First Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 8:30 AM - 11:40 AM
  • Tue 8:30 AM - 11:40 AM
  • Wed 8:30 AM - 11:40 AM
  • Thu 8:30 AM - 11:40 AM
  • Fri 8:30 AM - 11:40 AM

This intensive course meets for a full hour five days ...

This intensive course meets for a full hour five days a week and provides a first approach to the Italian
language for absolute beginners. Attention is devoted to the four skills of speaking, understanding,
reading, and writing with a progression from greater emphasis on listening and speaking to a balance of
all skills as the semester progresses. Aspects of Italian history, culture, and contemporary life are also introduced through readings, listening materials, videos and films and through the use of language
technologies (like Blackboard and other web tools). The general objectives are to provide students with
basic tools for oral and written communication in Italian, but also to offer them the opportunity to learn
about Italian culture and life and to reflect about intercultural differences and similarities.



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Intens Intermediate Italian ITAL-032-20

Credits: 6
Main Second Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 8:30 AM - 11:30 AM
  • Tue 8:30 AM - 11:30 AM
  • Wed 8:30 AM - 11:30 AM
  • Thu 8:30 AM - 11:30 AM
  • Fri 8:30 AM - 11:30 AM

This intensive course meets for a full hour five days ...

This intensive course meets for a full hour five days a week and it is designed to further develop language
ability and knowledge of the Italian culture for students who have completed Basic Intensive Italian or
have already had some exposure to the language. As in the case of Intensive Basic Italian, the four
skills of speaking, understanding, reading and writing are developed in a balanced way. Aspects of Italian
history, culture, and contemporary life are also introduced through readings, listening materials, videos
and films and through the use of language technologies (like Blackboard and other web tools). The
general objective is to provide students with basic tools for oral and written communication in Italian and
to offer them the opportunity to learn about Italian culture and life, but also to reflect about intercultural
differences and similarities.
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Intro to Justice & Peace JUPS-123-130

Credits: 3
Cross Session
Distance
Day and Time

This course meets entirely online.

What are better ways of understanding the concepts and core ...

What are better ways of understanding the concepts and core practices of peace and justice? What are the movements and structures that contribute to justice and peace? What are the obstacles? And what can societies and persons do to make this a more just and peaceful world? These are some of the questions we will examine through readings, discussions, a group conflict transformation project that focuses on "hot spots" around the world, and guest speakers. Students may opt to do a semester-long community-based learning placement with a justice and peace organization. The course will include regular student-facilitated discussions and require active participation, approximately 15 pages of written work.
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Nonviolence Theory & Practice JUPS-202-130

Credits: 3
Cross Session
Distance
Day and Time

This course meets entirely online.

Is nonviolence a viable option for social and political change ...

Is nonviolence a viable option for social and political change in today's world? Or is it merely an idealistic lifestyle choice? The word "nonviolence" is frequently misunderstood and abused, tending to be defined in the negative. It can be used in very narrow or broad constructs and can be based on a wide variety of philosophies and practices. This course will use numerous case studies, readings on philosophy, theology and strategy, and experiential exercises to examine the roots and directions of both principled and pragmatic ACTIVE nonviolence. The question remains: can struggle for a just world while at the same time, not use the methods of oppression? Can nonviolent struggle be effective? What's the difference between conflict resolution and nonviolent struggle?

With a seminar format, student participation is expected. Assignments include succinct presentions including a biography of a pacifist (based on his or her book review and/or informational interview), an analysis of case study of active nonviolence, and the theoretical construction of an original nonviolent campaign (group project). Throughout the semester, each student will work on a consultancy to a social change organization, culminating in a final report.
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Women, Men, and Language LING-343-10

Credits: 3
Main First Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Tue 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Wed 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Thu 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM


Understanding the links between language and gender can lead to ...


Understanding the links between language and gender can lead to a deeper understanding of the functioning of language, as well as the sociohistorical contingency of gender difference and its political implications. In this course, we will be introduced to the field of language and gender, overviewing important research and major theoretical approaches to gendered linguistic practice. Through lectures, group exercises, weekly readings, class discussions and data analysis, the course will cover topics including gender as cultural difference, power, and social practice; sexist and heterosexist language; language and gender in interaction (including turn-taking and gossip); the linguistic construction of masculine and feminine styles; cross-cultural perspectives on language and gender; and language and sexuality. Students will also learn to gather and analyze their own data, emphasizing the development of skills in linguistic analysis, critical thinking, and argumentative writing.
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Data Language Mining w/Python LING-369-10

Credits: 3
Main First Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Tue 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Wed 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Thu 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM

During the last 25 years, natural language processing has advanced ...

During the last 25 years, natural language processing has advanced from using hand-curated "toy systems" to employing robust and sophisticated statistical techniques. While the improvements have been substantial, applying those improvements to real world data still requires linguistic intuition and analysis. This course will discuss techniques for handling, manipulating, and making discoveries from large and small quantities of unstructured (and often unruly) language data. Topics will include: data acquisition, text encoding and data formats, information extraction, domain adaptation, and evaluation measures. A large focus will be placed on implementation; students will build systems with these components, exploiting unstructured linguistic data for use and measuring their success quantitatively.
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Principles of Marketing MARK-220-20

Credits: 3
Main Second Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Tue 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Wed 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Thu 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM

A first course on tools and approaches for making marketing ...

A first course on tools and approaches for making marketing decisions. Marketing is viewed as a broad technology for influencing behavior, beyond functions like selling and advertising. Topics covered include consumer behavior, marketing research, and marketing planning, with emphasis on marketing mix decisions: product strategy, communications, pricing, and distribution. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.
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Pre-Calculus MATH-001-20

Credits: 3
Main Second Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Tue 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Wed 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Thu 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM

Prerequisite Algebra II.

This course is designed to assist students whose high school ...

This course is designed to assist students whose high school mathematics background is insufficient for the standard first-year mathematics courses. It is primarily intended as a preparation for MATH-035. Topics include: algebraic operations, factoring, exponents and logarithms, polynomials, rational functions, trigonometric functions, and the logarithmic and exponential functions. Graphing and word problems will be stressed. This course is not intended to complete the math/science requirement in the College. Fall.
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Calculus I MATH-035-01

Credits: 4
Main Presession
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 1:00 PM - 3:40 PM
  • Tue 1:00 PM - 3:40 PM
  • Wed 1:00 PM - 3:40 PM
  • Thu 1:00 PM - 3:40 PM
  • Fri 1:00 PM - 3:40 PM
 
Lecture
  • Mon 1:00 PM - 3:40 PM
  • Tue 1:00 PM - 3:40 PM
  • Wed 1:00 PM - 3:40 PM
  • Thu 1:00 PM - 3:40 PM
  • Fri 1:00 PM - 3:40 PM

This is the first part of the four semester calculus ...

This is the first part of the four semester calculus sequence (Math-035-036 and 137-150) for mathematics and science majors. Students do not need to have any familiarity with calculus, but do need good algebra/precalculus preparation.

Topics include limits, derivatives, techniques of differentiation, applications of the derivative, the Riemann integral, the trigonometric and inverse trigonometric functions, and the logarithmic and exponential functions. Fall and Spring.
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Calculus I MATH-035-10

Credits: 4
Main First Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 4:00 PM - 6:40 PM
  • Tue 4:00 PM - 6:40 PM
  • Wed 4:00 PM - 6:40 PM
  • Thu 4:00 PM - 6:40 PM

This is the first part of the four semester calculus ...

This is the first part of the four semester calculus sequence (Math-035-036 and 137-150) for mathematics and science majors. Students do not need to have any familiarity with calculus, but do need good algebra/precalculus preparation.

Topics include limits, derivatives, techniques of differentiation, applications of the derivative, the Riemann integral, the trigonometric and inverse trigonometric functions, and the logarithmic and exponential functions. Fall and Spring.
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Calculus I MATH-035-20

Credits: 4
Main Second Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 3:00 PM - 5:40 PM
  • Tue 3:00 PM - 5:40 PM
  • Wed 3:00 PM - 5:40 PM
  • Thu 3:00 PM - 5:40 PM

This is the first part of the four semester calculus ...

This is the first part of the four semester calculus sequence (Math-035-036 and 137-150) for mathematics and science majors. Students do not need to have any familiarity with calculus, but do need good algebra/precalculus preparation.

Topics include limits, derivatives, techniques of differentiation, applications of the derivative, the Riemann integral, the trigonometric and inverse trigonometric functions, and the logarithmic and exponential functions. Fall and Spring.
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Calculus II MATH-036-20

Credits: 4
Main Second Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 3:00 PM - 5:40 PM
  • Tue 3:00 PM - 5:40 PM
  • Wed 3:00 PM - 5:40 PM
  • Thu 3:00 PM - 5:40 PM

Prerequisite Calculus I.

A continuation of MATH-035.

Topics include techniques of integration, applications ...

A continuation of MATH-035.

Topics include techniques of integration, applications of the definite integral, improper integrals, Newton's method and numerical integration, sequences and series including Taylor's theorem and power series, and elementary separable and first and second order linear differential equations. Fall and Spring.
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Probability and Statistics MATH-040-10

Credits: 4
Main First Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 10:45 AM - 1:25 PM
  • Tue 10:45 AM - 1:25 PM
  • Wed 10:45 AM - 1:25 PM
  • Thu 10:45 AM - 1:25 PM

Cannot be taken for credit if the student has already taken ECON 121, OPIM 173, IPOL 320 or MATH 140.

This course will introduce students to the basic concepts, logic ...

This course will introduce students to the basic concepts, logic, and issues involved in statistical reasoning, as well as basic statistical methods used to analyze data and evaluate studies.
The major topics to be covered include methods for exploratory data analysis, an introduction to sampling and experimental design, elementary probability theory and random variables, and methods for statistical inference including simple linear regression.
The objectives of this course are to help students develop a critical approach to the evaluation of study designs, data and results, and to develop skills in the application of basic statistical methods in empirical research. An important feature of the course will be the use of statistical software to facilitate the understanding of important statistical ideas and for the implementation of data analysis. The course has two lectures and one lab section.

Cannot be taken for credit if the student has already taken ECON 121, Gov 201, OPIM 173, IPOL 320 or MATH 140.

College Economics and Political Economy majors should enroll in ECON 121, rather than MATH 040.

This course does NOT satisfy the Mathematics minor or majors requirement for a Statistics class--these students should enroll in MATH 140.

Seniors and Post Baccalaureate Pre-Medical students must get special permission to enroll in this course.
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Probability and Statistics MATH-040-20

Credits: 4
Main Second Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 10:45 AM - 1:25 PM
  • Tue 10:45 AM - 1:25 PM
  • Wed 10:45 AM - 1:25 PM
  • Thu 10:45 AM - 1:25 PM

Cannot be taken for credit if the student has already taken ECON 121, OPIM 173, IPOL 320 or MATH 140.

This course will introduce students to the basic concepts, logic ...

This course will introduce students to the basic concepts, logic, and issues involved in statistical reasoning, as well as basic statistical methods used to analyze data and evaluate studies.
The major topics to be covered include methods for exploratory data analysis, an introduction to sampling and experimental design, elementary probability theory and random variables, and methods for statistical inference including simple linear regression.
The objectives of this course are to help students develop a critical approach to the evaluation of study designs, data and results, and to develop skills in the application of basic statistical methods in empirical research. An important feature of the course will be the use of statistical software to facilitate the understanding of important statistical ideas and for the implementation of data analysis. The course has two lectures and one lab section.

Cannot be taken for credit if the student has already taken ECON 121, Gov 201, OPIM 173, IPOL 320 or MATH 140.

College Economics and Political Economy majors should enroll in ECON 121, rather than MATH 040.

This course does NOT satisfy the Mathematics minor or majors requirement for a Statistics class--these students should enroll in MATH 140.

Seniors and Post Baccalaureate Pre-Medical students must get special permission to enroll in this course.
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Multivariable Calculus MATH-137-10

Credits: 4
Main First Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 1:00 PM - 3:40 PM
  • Tue 1:00 PM - 3:40 PM
  • Wed 1:00 PM - 3:40 PM
  • Thu 1:00 PM - 3:40 PM

Prerequisite Calculus II

This is a first course in differential and integral calculus ...

This is a first course in differential and integral calculus of functions of several variables. After the introduction of vectors and the 2 and 3-dimensional Euclidean space, functions of several variables are discussed. Functions of two variables will be visualized by surfaces in the three-dimensional space. Further topics include partial derivatives and the total derivative of real-valued and vector-valued functions, the chain rule, directional derivatives, extrema of real-valued functions, constrained extrema and Lagrange multipliers, double and triple integrals, and the change of variables formula in multiple integrals.

This course consists of two 75-minute lectures and one 50-minute recitation section.
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Linear Algebra MATH-150-20

Credits: 4
Main Second Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 10:45 AM - 1:25 PM
  • Tue 10:45 AM - 1:25 PM
  • Wed 10:45 AM - 1:25 PM
  • Thu 10:45 AM - 1:25 PM

Prerequisite calculus II

Normally taken after MATH-137.

This course presents the basic theory ...

Normally taken after MATH-137.

This course presents the basic theory and methods of finite dimensional vector spaces and linear transformations on them. Topics include: matrices and systems of linear equations; vector spaces, bases, and dimension; linear transformations, kernel, image, matrix representation, basis change, and rank; scalar products and orthogonality; determinants; eigenvalues, eigenvectors, diagonalization of symmetric matrices, positive definite matrices. Fall and Spring.
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Mathematics of Climate MATH-412-30

Credits: 3
Cross Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 6:00 PM - 8:30 PM
  • Wed 6:00 PM - 8:30 PM

This course is for undergraduates only.

In this course, mathematics and statistics will used to answer ...

In this course, mathematics and statistics will used to answer current questions of interest in climate science and sustainability, and climate science will be used to motivate and explain techniques from applied mathematics and statistics.

The course will emphasize conceptual models that capture important aspects of the Earth's climate system: Energy balance and temperature distribution, ocean circulation patterns such as the Gulf Stream and El Niño – Southern Oscillation, ice caps and glaciation periods, the carbon cycle, and the biological pump. Mathematical and statistical topics will be selected from theories and methodologies for dynamical systems, bifurcation theory, ordinary and partial differential equations, signal processing, regression analysis, extreme value theory, and data assimilation.

Some knowledge of Matlab or R is needed.
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Mathematics of Climate MATH-412-35

Credits: 3
Cross Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 6:00 PM - 8:30 PM
  • Wed 6:00 PM - 8:30 PM

This course section is for graduates students only.

In this course, mathematics and statistics will used to answer ...

In this course, mathematics and statistics will used to answer current questions of interest in climate science and sustainability, and climate science will be used to motivate and explain techniques from applied mathematics and statistics.

The course will emphasize conceptual models that capture important aspects of the Earth's climate system: Energy balance and temperature distribution, ocean circulation patterns such as the Gulf Stream and El Niño – Southern Oscillation, ice caps and glaciation periods, the carbon cycle, and the biological pump. Mathematical and statistical topics will be selected from theories and methodologies for dynamical systems, bifurcation theory, ordinary and partial differential equations, signal processing, regression analysis, extreme value theory, and data assimilation.

Some knowledge of Matlab or R is needed.
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Management & Org Behavior MGMT-201-10

Credits: 3
Main First Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Tue 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Wed 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Thu 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM

This course is a comprehensive overview of the management process ...

This course is a comprehensive overview of the management process and organizational behavior from a behavioral and social science perspective. Topics include: management across cultures; managing with ethics and social responsibility; fundamentals of organizing; organizational culture and design; leadership; motivation; communication; interpersonal skills; teamwork and group dynamics; goal-setting; alternative work arrangements; power and politics; conflict and negotiation; managing change; and management development. Emphasis is on the analysis and understanding of human behavior in organizations.
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Business Statistics OPIM-173-10

Credits: 3
Main First Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Tue 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Wed 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Thu 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM

This course introduces the basic concepts of Statistics and their ...

This course introduces the basic concepts of Statistics and their application in managerial decision-making. In the first part of the course, we consider the steps of data collection, preliminary data analysis (numerical and graphical), probability and uncertainty, statistical inference. In the second part of the course, we examine statistical model building for the purposes of understanding variability and making forecasts. A detailed development of multiple regression analysis is complemented by some study of time series analysis. The objective is to demonstrate the effectiveness of statistical modeling in guiding managerial decision-making. The statistical analysis of large data sets is an integral part of modern business practice. Accordingly, both spreadsheets and statistical software will be used throughout the course.
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Intensive 1st Level Persian I PERS-011-10

Credits: 6
Main First Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Tue 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Wed 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Thu 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Fri 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM

Not for native speakers of Persian. There is no pass/fail option for this course. Please contact the Summer and Special Programs Office at (202) 687-8200 for more information.

This course introduces students to the basic structures of the ...

This course introduces students to the basic structures of the Persian language. All four language skills: speaking, listening comprehension, reading comprehension, and writing will be taught equally using the immersion method. This method will help students achieve confidence communicating in the Persian language. Aspects of Persian culture will be introduced on a regular basis. At the end of this course, students will be able to:
1. Have basic level conversation in Persian: 1st level 5 minutes, 2nd level 10 minutes.
2. Read texts of elementary level: 1st level 50- 100 2nd level 100-200 words.
3. Write short paragraphs with reasonable accuracy: 1st level 50- 100 2nd level 100-200 words.
4. Develop cultural awareness through readings, films, music, etc.
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Intensive 1st Level Persian II PERS-012-20

Credits: 6
Main Second Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Tue 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Wed 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Thu 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Fri 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM

Successful completion of PERS 011 or permission of the instructor. There is no pass/fail option for this course. Visiting students must take a placement test prior to registering for this course. Please contact the Summer and Special Programs Office at (202) 687-8200 for more information.

This course introduces students to the basic structures of the ...

This course introduces students to the basic structures of the Persian language. All four language skills: speaking, listening comprehension, reading comprehension, and writing will be taught equally using the immersion method. This method will help students achieve confidence communicating in the Persian language. Aspects of Persian culture will be introduced on a regular basis. At the end of this course, students will be able to:
1. Have basic level conversation in Persian: 1st level 5 minutes, 2nd level 10 minutes.
2. Read texts of elementary level: 1st level 50- 100 2nd level 100-200 words.
3. Write short paragraphs with reasonable accuracy: 1st level 50- 100 2nd level 100-200 words.
4. Develop cultural awareness through readings, films, music, etc.
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Intensive 2nd Level Pers I PERS-021-10

Credits: 6
Main First Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Tue 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Wed 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Thu 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Fri 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM

Requires successful completion of PERS 012 or permission of instructor. There is no pass/fail option for this course. Visiting students must take a placement test prior to registering for this course. Please contact the Summer and Special Programs Office at (202) 687-8200 for more information.

Permission needed from Instructor. This intensive intermediate level I course ...

Permission needed from Instructor. This intensive intermediate level I course is designed to continue developing the student's communicative skills (reading, writing, listening, and speaking). This course is conducted in the target language. Initially, it affords students a view of basic Persian, then an introduction to more complex syntactic grammatical forms. Aspects of Persian history, culture, and contemporary life are also introduced through readings, listening materials, videos and films, and through the use of language technologies (web tools). The students will also be given practice in reading aloud and giving oral presentations of materials taken from the web, media, and television broadcast. As a final project, students will write a composition of 200-350 words (Intermed. I), 400-500 words (Intermed.II).
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Intensive 2nd Level Pers II PERS-022-20

Credits: 6
Main Second Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Tue 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Wed 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Thu 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Fri 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM

Requires successful completion of PERS 021 or permission of instructor. There is no pass/fail option for this course. Visiting students must take a placement test prior to registering for this course. Please contact the Summer and Special Programs Office at (202) 687-8200 for more information.

Permission needed from Instructor. This intensive intermediate level I course ...

Permission needed from Instructor. This intensive intermediate level I course is designed to continue developing the student's communicative skills (reading, writing, listening, and speaking). This course is conducted in the target language. Initially, it affords students a view of basic Persian, then an introduction to more complex syntactic grammatical forms. Aspects of Persian history, culture, and contemporary life are also introduced through readings, listening materials, videos and films, and through the use of language technologies (web tools). The students will also be given practice in reading aloud and giving oral presentations of materials taken from the web, media, and television broadcast. As a final project, students will write a composition of 200-350 words (Intermed. I), 400-500 words (Intermed.II).
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Intens Advanced Persian PERS-203-10

Credits: 6
Main First Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Tue 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Wed 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Thu 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Fri 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM

Intro to Ethics PHIL-010-10

Credits: 3
Main First Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 8:30 AM - 10:35 AM
  • Tue 8:30 AM - 10:35 AM
  • Wed 8:30 AM - 10:35 AM
  • Thu 8:30 AM - 10:35 AM

Philosophy 010 is a general introduction to philosophical ethics. Questions ...

Philosophy 010 is a general introduction to philosophical ethics. Questions addressed include: What is the nature of morality? How do we know what is right and what is wrong? What sorts of moral obligations do we stand under? What are our duties to others and to ourselves? What is the nature of virtue and vice? How do we assess moral character? Readings are generally drawn from both traditional and contemporary philosophical authors. Reading lists and specific topics addressed vary from semester to semester and from instructor to instructor, as do required work and expectations. Please consult the syllabi posted online by individual instructors for more detail.
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Intro to Ethics PHIL-010-20

Credits: 3
Main Second Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Tue 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Wed 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Thu 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM

Philosophy 010 is a general introduction to philosophical ethics. Questions ...

Philosophy 010 is a general introduction to philosophical ethics. Questions addressed include: What is the nature of morality? How do we know what is right and what is wrong? What sorts of moral obligations do we stand under? What are our duties to others and to ourselves? What is the nature of virtue and vice? How do we assess moral character? Readings are generally drawn from both traditional and contemporary philosophical authors. Reading lists and specific topics addressed vary from semester to semester and from instructor to instructor, as do required work and expectations. Please consult the syllabi posted online by individual instructors for more detail.
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Intro to Philosophy PHIL-020-10

Credits: 3
Main First Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 10:45 AM - 12:20 PM
  • Tue 10:45 AM - 12:20 PM
  • Wed 10:45 AM - 12:20 PM
  • Thu 10:45 AM - 12:20 PM
  • Fri 10:45 AM - 12:20 PM

An introduction to some of the central questions of philosophy ...

An introduction to some of the central questions of philosophy through the writings of both traditional and contemporary authors. Questions addressed may include the relationship between mind and matter; between causation and free will; meaning, truth, and reality; knowledge, perception, belief, and thought. Topics and readings vary from semester to semester and instructor to instructor, as do the course requirements and expectations. Please consult the syllabi of the individual instructors for more detail.
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Intro to Philosophy PHIL-020-130

Credits: 3
Cross Session
Distance
Day and Time

This course meets entirely online.

An introduction to some of the central questions of philosophy ...

An introduction to some of the central questions of philosophy through the writings of both traditional and contemporary authors. Questions addressed may include the relationship between mind and matter; between causation and free will; meaning, truth, and reality; knowledge, perception, belief, and thought. Topics and readings vary from semester to semester and instructor to instructor, as do the course requirements and expectations. Please consult the syllabi of the individual instructors for more detail.
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Intro to Philosophy PHIL-020-20

Credits: 3
Main Second Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Tue 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Wed 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Thu 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM

An introduction to some of the central questions of philosophy ...

An introduction to some of the central questions of philosophy through the writings of both traditional and contemporary authors. Questions addressed may include the relationship between mind and matter; between causation and free will; meaning, truth, and reality; knowledge, perception, belief, and thought. Topics and readings vary from semester to semester and instructor to instructor, as do the course requirements and expectations. Please consult the syllabi of the individual instructors for more detail.
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Ethics: Bioethics PHIL-105-01

Credits: 3
Main Presession
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Tue 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Wed 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Thu 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Fri 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM

Bioethics is the interdisciplinary study of the ethics of medicine ...

Bioethics is the interdisciplinary study of the ethics of medicine, biological research, and health policy. Students will be introduced to key concepts in ethical theory, and then apply these concepts to real world problems concerning the doctor-patient relationship, the ethics of research, enhancement, disability, reproductive technology and abortion, and end of life care and euthanasia. The main text for this course will be Lewis Vaughn’s Bioethics: Principles, Issues, and Cases. Students will write two short (2-3 page) papers defending an ethical evaluation of a case study. There will be an in-class midterm and a take-home final.
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Ethics: Bioethics PHIL-105-20

Credits: 3
Main Second Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Tue 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Wed 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Thu 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM

Bioethics is the interdisciplinary study of the ethics of medicine ...

Bioethics is the interdisciplinary study of the ethics of medicine, biological research, and health policy. Students will be introduced to key concepts in ethical theory, and then apply these concepts to real world problems concerning the doctor-patient relationship, the ethics of research, enhancement, disability, reproductive technology and abortion, and end of life care and euthanasia. The main text for this course will be Lewis Vaughn’s Bioethics: Principles, Issues, and Cases. Students will write two short (2-3 page) papers defending an ethical evaluation of a case study. There will be an in-class midterm and a take-home final.
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Ethics: Justice PHIL-132-130

Credits: 3
Cross Session
Distance
Day and Time

This course meets entirely online.

What would make a society just? How should the bene ...

What would make a society just? How should the bene?ts and burdens of social life be distributed? How should the
members of society treat each other?
These questions are at the core of current political debates about issues such as income inequality,
access to health care, public education funding, a?rmative action, the fairness of the criminal justice
system, gender inequality, religious liberty, etc. These are not merely technocratic disputes about the
most effective way to solve social problems, but debates about how members of a society ought to
treat each other. While most will agree that justice is a central standard for political and social life,
there are deep disagreements about what justice requires, i.e. the right criteria for distributing
bene?ts and burdens in society.
In this class, you will learn how to engage in a reasoned debate about these questions. We will start
by critically examining the main classical positions: Utilitarianism, Liberal Egalitarianism,
Libertarianism, Marxism, and Communitarianism. We will consider the relations between justice and
other political ideals such as equality, liberty, fairness, wellbeing, community, and recognition. We
will discuss feminist critiques of classical conceptions of justice and consider whether justice is best
thought of in terms of the distribution of goods. Finally, we will look at oppression as a distinct
form of injustice, focusing in particular on racial oppression. The readings include texts by Elisabeth
Anderson, Gerald A. Cohen, Glenn Loury, John S. Mill, Robert Nozick, Susan Okin, John Rawls,
Michael Sandel, and Iris M. Young.
This class will introduce you to some of the central topics and methods in political philosophy.
Throughout the class, you will be developing the skills to interpret philosophical arguments and to
evaluate them critically. The overall goal of the class is to help you become a more thoughtful and
critical participant in political and social debates. This class counts towards fulfillment of the Georgetown
general education requirement in philosophy.
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Ethics:Moral Psychology PHIL-143-10

Credits: 3
Main First Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Tue 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Wed 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Thu 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM

In what circumstances should a person be held responsible for ...

In what circumstances should a person be held responsible for his or her actions and attitudes? What sorts of traits are necessary to live well, ethically speaking? How do these issues intersect with mental health and wellness? This course will examine these questions in depth, leading us to investigate a number of fascinating philosophical issues located at the intersection of ethics, psychology, and philosophy of mind—issues such as: implicit bias; addiction and weakness of will; the puzzle of “moral luck”; happiness; authenticity; trauma; and a variety of moral emotions like shame, self-respect, resentment, trust, hope, and forgiveness.

Students will be required to purchase two classic texts by Aristotle and Immanuel Kant, respectively. The remainder of the readings will be available on Blackboard, from contemporary authors including Martha Nussbaum, José Medina, Judith Halpern, Manuel Vargas, Margaret Walker, Lori Paul, Otto Maduro, Joshua Greene, Harry Frankfurt, Charles Guignon, Malcolm X, Ta-Nehisi Coates, and the Dalai Lama. Grades will be based on weekly reading reflections, three in-class quizzes, two 5-page argumentative essays, and a final exam.
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Ethics: Metaethics PHIL-148-20

Credits: 3
Main Second Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 10:45 AM - 12:15 PM
  • Tue 10:45 AM - 12:15 PM
  • Wed 10:45 AM - 12:15 PM
  • Thu 10:45 AM - 12:15 PM
  • Fri 10:45 AM - 12:15 PM

In this course we will examine some of the central ...

In this course we will examine some of the central ethical concerns of classical Greek philosophy, including: what living a good life means, virtue, happiness, practical rationality, education, and politics. Throughout we will also consider two further themes: (1) the significance of philosophy - reflective examination of self and society - and the importance of philosophical activity for the successful pursuit of the good life; (2) the challenge that classical philosophy poses to modernity and post-modernity. To this end we will read a number of classical texts, including (but not limited to) Plato's Meno, Protagoras, and extracts from the Republic, and portions of Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics and Politics.
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Philosophy of Emotions PHIL-154-10

Credits: 3
Main First Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Tue 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Wed 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Thu 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM

Philosophy of Language PHIL-170-10

Credits: 3
Main First Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Tue 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Wed 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Thu 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM

This course is an introduction to philosophy by way of ...

This course is an introduction to philosophy by way of an exploration of basic questions in the philosophy of language. We will examine some of the major philosophical attempts to make sense of meaning and communication. Among the questions we may consider are: What is communication? What is meaning? What is the relationship between meaning and reference? Between meaning and truth ? Although some readings may be drawn from traditional philosophical sources, the orientation of the course is primarily towards 20th century and contemporary philosophy. This course is intended primarily for students who do not intend to major in philosophy. Philosophy 213 is more appropriate for those considering a philosophy major.

Reading lists and specific topics addressed vary from semester to semester and from instructor to instructor, as do required work and expectations. Please consult the syllabi posted online by individual instructors for more detail.
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Philosophy of Mind PHIL-188-20

Credits: 3
Main Second Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 8:30 AM - 10:30 AM
  • Tue 8:30 AM - 10:30 AM
  • Wed 8:30 AM - 10:30 AM
  • Thu 8:30 AM - 10:30 AM

Description: In this course, we will explore the relationship between ...

Description: In this course, we will explore the relationship between mind and body: the relationship between conscious phenomena like dizziness and the smell of coffee and physical phenomena like brain activity and the central nervous system. We begin by considering the classic positions on the metaphysics of mind, including: dualism, behaviorism, identity theory, functionalism, and eliminative materialism. In the second part of the course we turn to a more contemporary iteration of the mind-body problem. In particular, we will discuss several major philosophical and scientific proposals concerning the extent to which cognition is an essentially embodied/embedded phenomenon.

Assessment:
Biweekly reflection papers (of about 500 words) [20%]
A Take-Home Midterm [35%]
A Final Paper (between 1,250-1,500 words) [35%]
Participation [10%]

Textbooks:
Consciousness: An Introduction (2nd Edition) by Susan J. Blackmore (New York: Oxford University Press, 2012). ISBN: 9780199739097

Mind: A Brief Introduction by John Searle (New York: Oxford University Press, 2004). ISBN: 0195157346

Supersizing the Mind: Embodiment, Action, and Cognitive Extension by Andy Clark (New York: Oxford University Press, 2010). ISBN: 0199773688
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Aesthetics PHIL-189-10

Credits: 3
Main First Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Tue 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Wed 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Thu 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM

At the end of the Republic, Plato has Socrates banish ...

At the end of the Republic, Plato has Socrates banish the poets from his ideal city. Plato fears that the poets will corrupt the citizens, encouraging them to let their passions, as opposed to their reason, rule them. In exiling the poets, Plato inaugurated a conflict between art and philosophy that continues even today. During this time philosophical aesthetics has lived in genteel poverty on the outskirts of the discipline, trying to refute, diminish, or reverse Plato’s charges while occasionally admitting art’s guilt.

This course will take Plato's worry about the danger of art seriously. It will begin with a survey of various definitions of art (e.g. as representation, expression, form), considering the extent to which these answers relieve or deepen such concerns. With these definitions in hand, we will then turn our attention to issues that address the danger of art more explicitly, including the relationship between the aesthetic and the ethical, mass/popular art and kitsch, public art, and the aesthetics of the political.

Given our focus upon the philosophical critique and defense of art, the majority of readings will come from philosophy, although these will be supplemented by selections by artists and critics. Authors will include Plato, Aristotle, Schopenhauer, Danto, Greenberg, Hanslick, and Tolstoy. Of course, any course in the philosophy of art would be incomplete without engagement with actual art. This will include scheduled film screenings (Banksy’s Exit Through the Gift Shop and Lech Majewski’s The Mill and the Cross), visits to exhibitions at the National Gallery of Art and the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, and trips to contemplate some of Washington D.C.’s public art, such as Maya Lin’s Vietnam Veterans Memorial.

Texts: All texts will be available on Blackboard.

Assessment: Students will be required to write three 4-6 page papers (20% each) and give a 10-15 minute, philosophically-informed presentation on an artistic movement or artist (20%). The remaining 20% of the grade will be based upon participation, broadly construed to include not only in-class discussion, but also participation in course-related activities and the maintenance of an electronic reflection journal.
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Basic Physics PHYS-007-10

Credits: 3
Main First Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 1:00 PM - 2:35 PM
  • Tue 1:00 PM - 2:35 PM
  • Wed 1:00 PM - 2:35 PM
  • Thu 1:00 PM - 2:35 PM
  • Fri 1:00 PM - 2:35 PM

This 3-credit, algebra-based course, may qualify as one of the ...

This 3-credit, algebra-based course, may qualify as one of the science requirements for non-science majors. It will cover topics in Classical Physics (Mechanics, Heat, Electromagnetism and Optics.
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Principles of Physics I PHYS-101-10

Credits: 3
Main First Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM
  • Tue 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM
  • Wed 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM
  • Thu 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM
  • Fri 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM
 
Recitation
  • Tue 10:15 AM - 11:15 AM
  • Thu 10:15 AM - 11:15 AM

This is the lecture and recitation only. The lab section must be registered for separately.

PHYS-101 and 102 constitute a year-long comprehensive calculus-based introduction to ...

PHYS-101 and 102 constitute a year-long comprehensive calculus-based introduction to physics, particularly suited to the needs and interests of pre-medical students. Topics covered are Newton's laws, linear, planar, and rotational motions, work, energy, momentum, gravitation, periodic motion and waves, fluid mechanics, acoustics, thermodynamics, electric fields, electric potential, dielectrics, magnetic fields, induction, DC circuits, electromagnetic waves and light, interference and diffraction of light, geometric optics, atomic, quantum, nuclear, and condensed matter physics, and cosmology. Important note: Familiarity with calculus is assumed. Three lecture hours, one recitation hour, and two laboratory hours.
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Principles of Physics I PHYS-101-11

Credits: 3
Main First Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM
  • Tue 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM
  • Wed 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM
  • Thu 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM
  • Fri 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM
 
Recitation
  • Mon 10:15 AM - 11:15 AM
  • Wed 10:15 AM - 11:15 AM

This is the lecture and recitation only. The lab section must be registered for separately.

PHYS-101 and 102 constitute a year-long comprehensive calculus-based introduction to ...

PHYS-101 and 102 constitute a year-long comprehensive calculus-based introduction to physics, particularly suited to the needs and interests of pre-medical students. Topics covered are Newton's laws, linear, planar, and rotational motions, work, energy, momentum, gravitation, periodic motion and waves, fluid mechanics, acoustics, thermodynamics, electric fields, electric potential, dielectrics, magnetic fields, induction, DC circuits, electromagnetic waves and light, interference and diffraction of light, geometric optics, atomic, quantum, nuclear, and condensed matter physics, and cosmology. Important note: Familiarity with calculus is assumed. Three lecture hours, one recitation hour, and two laboratory hours.
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Principles of Physics II PHYS-102-20

Credits: 3
Main Second Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM
  • Tue 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM
  • Wed 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM
  • Thu 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM
  • Fri 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM
 
Recitation
  • Tue 10:15 AM - 11:15 AM
  • Thu 10:15 AM - 11:15 AM

This is the lecture and recitation only. The lab section must be registered for separately.

PHYS-101 and 102 constitute a year-long comprehensive calculus-based introduction to ...

PHYS-101 and 102 constitute a year-long comprehensive calculus-based introduction to physics, particularly suited to the needs and interests of pre-medical students. Topics covered are Newton's laws, linear, planar, and rotational motions, work, energy, momentum, gravitation, periodic motion and waves, fluid mechanics, acoustics, thermodynamics, electric fields, electric potential, dielectrics, magnetic fields, induction, DC circuits, electromagnetic waves and light, interference and diffraction of light, geometric optics, atomic, quantum, nuclear, and condensed matter physics, and cosmology. Important note: Familiarity with calculus is assumed. Three lecture hours, one recitation hour, and two laboratory hours.
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Principles of Physics II PHYS-102-21

Credits: 3
Main Second Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM
  • Tue 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM
  • Wed 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM
  • Thu 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM
  • Fri 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM
 
Recitation
  • Mon 10:15 AM - 11:15 AM
  • Wed 10:15 AM - 11:15 AM

This is the lecture and recitation only. The lab section must be registered for separately.

PHYS-101 and 102 constitute a year-long comprehensive calculus-based introduction to ...

PHYS-101 and 102 constitute a year-long comprehensive calculus-based introduction to physics, particularly suited to the needs and interests of pre-medical students. Topics covered are Newton's laws, linear, planar, and rotational motions, work, energy, momentum, gravitation, periodic motion and waves, fluid mechanics, acoustics, thermodynamics, electric fields, electric potential, dielectrics, magnetic fields, induction, DC circuits, electromagnetic waves and light, interference and diffraction of light, geometric optics, atomic, quantum, nuclear, and condensed matter physics, and cosmology. Important note: Familiarity with calculus is assumed. Three lecture hours, one recitation hour, and two laboratory hours.
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Prin of Physics I Lab PHYS-103-10

Credits: 1
Main First Session
Laboratory
Day and Time
  • Mon 10:15 AM - 1:00 PM
  • Wed 10:15 AM - 1:00 PM

PHYS-103 is the lab section for Principles of Physics I ...

PHYS-103 is the lab section for Principles of Physics I (PHYS-101).
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Prin of Physics I Lab PHYS-103-11

Credits: 1
Main First Session
Laboratory
Day and Time
  • Tue 10:15 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Thu 10:15 AM - 12:45 PM

PHYS-103 is the lab section for Principles of Physics I ...

PHYS-103 is the lab section for Principles of Physics I (PHYS-101).
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Prin of Physics Lab II PHYS-104-20

Credits: 1
Main Second Session
Laboratory
Day and Time
  • Mon 10:15 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Wed 10:15 AM - 12:45 PM

PHYS-104 is the lab section for Principles of Physics II ...

PHYS-104 is the lab section for Principles of Physics II (PHYS-102).
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Prin of Physics Lab II PHYS-104-21

Credits: 1
Main Second Session
Laboratory
Day and Time
  • Tue 10:15 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Thu 10:15 AM - 12:45 PM

PHYS-104 is the lab section for Principles of Physics II ...

PHYS-104 is the lab section for Principles of Physics II (PHYS-102).
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Public Speaking PSPK-080-10

Credits: 3
Main First Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 10:45 AM - 12:20 PM
  • Tue 10:45 AM - 12:20 PM
  • Wed 10:45 AM - 12:20 PM
  • Thu 10:45 AM - 12:20 PM
  • Fri 10:45 AM - 12:20 PM

A performance course designed to introduce basic principles of communication ...

A performance course designed to introduce basic principles of communication and the classical roots from which they were derived. Students will prepare and present speeches in both formal platform settings and informal group discussions. While attention will be given to extemporaneous delivery, the emphasis of the course is on work behind-the-scenes: organizing ideas, structuring messages, and adapting messages for specific audiences. Attention will also be given to methods for evaluating oral discourse. Students who experience anxiety in public speaking situations are encouraged to enroll. Fall and Spring. Must attend 1st class or lose place.

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Public Speaking PSPK-080-20

Credits: 3
Main Second Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 10:45 AM - 12:15 PM
  • Tue 10:45 AM - 12:15 PM
  • Wed 10:45 AM - 12:15 PM
  • Thu 10:45 AM - 12:15 PM
  • Fri 10:45 AM - 12:15 PM

A performance course designed to introduce basic principles of communication ...

A performance course designed to introduce basic principles of communication and the classical roots from which they were derived. Students will prepare and present speeches in both formal platform settings and informal group discussions. While attention will be given to extemporaneous delivery, the emphasis of the course is on work behind-the-scenes: organizing ideas, structuring messages, and adapting messages for specific audiences. Attention will also be given to methods for evaluating oral discourse. Students who experience anxiety in public speaking situations are encouraged to enroll. Fall and Spring. Must attend 1st class or lose place.

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Public Speaking PSPK-080-21

Credits: 3
Main Second Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
  • Tue 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
  • Wed 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
  • Thu 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
  • Fri 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM

A performance course designed to introduce basic principles of communication ...

A performance course designed to introduce basic principles of communication and the classical roots from which they were derived. Students will prepare and present speeches in both formal platform settings and informal group discussions. While attention will be given to extemporaneous delivery, the emphasis of the course is on work behind-the-scenes: organizing ideas, structuring messages, and adapting messages for specific audiences. Attention will also be given to methods for evaluating oral discourse. Students who experience anxiety in public speaking situations are encouraged to enroll. Fall and Spring. Must attend 1st class or lose place.

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General Psychology PSYC-001-130

Credits: 3
Cross Session
Distance
Day and Time

This course meets entirely online.

This introductory course surveys the field and acquaints the student ...

This introductory course surveys the field and acquaints the student with the major areas of Psychology, including perception, memory, cognition, neuroscience, learning, motivation, emotion, personality, social behavior, development, and psychopathology.

PSYC-001. GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY IS A PREREQUISITE FOR ALL OTHER PSYCHOLOGY COURSES.
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General Psychology PSYC-001-20

Credits: 3
Main Second Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Tue 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Wed 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Thu 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM

This introductory course surveys the field and acquaints the student ...

This introductory course surveys the field and acquaints the student with the major areas of Psychology, including perception, memory, cognition, neuroscience, learning, motivation, emotion, personality, social behavior, development, and psychopathology.

PSYC-001. GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY IS A PREREQUISITE FOR ALL OTHER PSYCHOLOGY COURSES.
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Drugs and Human Behavior PSYC-127-130

Credits: 3
Cross Session
Distance
Day and Time

Course meets entirely online.

None
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Social Psychology PSYC-140-20

Credits: 3
Main Second Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Tue 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Wed 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Thu 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM

This course examines the social foundations of human nature by ...

This course examines the social foundations of human nature by addressing the following aspects of social life: (a) social influence; (b) social roles and public behavior; (c) inferences about other people; and (d) interpersonal relations and groups. Among the topics to be considered are: the social origins of knowledge and of self, the influence of public behavior on social and moral norms, persuasion, impression management, social emotions, judgment of responsibility and character, interpersonal attraction, aggression, altruism, group dynamics, and inter-group conflict. The course will concentrate on the level of analysis of the individual, but will include sociological and evolutionary perspectives where appropriate.
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Psychology of Gender PSYC-241-10

Credits: 3
Main First Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Tue 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Wed 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Thu 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM

Introduction to Sociology SOCI-001-10

Credits: 3
Main First Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Tue 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Wed 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Thu 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM

Sections:

SOCI 001-01: INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY
Professor Sarah Stiles
MW ...

Sections:

SOCI 001-01: INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY
Professor Sarah Stiles
MW 8:00am - 9:15am
Healy 104

SOCI 001-02: INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY
Professor Sarah Stiles
MW 9:30am - 10:45am
Healy 104

Sociology is the study of social life, social change, and the social causes and consequences of human behavior. Sociologists investigate the structure of groups, organizations, and societies, and how people interact within these contexts. (American Sociological Association, 2005)

In this course students will learn the basics of sociology through a variety of readings and film clips and "do" sociology with regular data workshops where they will test theories and recognize the social construction we all experience. By the end of the semester, students will be able to understand and explain:

• Basic concepts, generalizations, theories, and methods used in the study of sociology;
• The sociological focus and the influence the study of sociology has on identifying, explaining, and solving (or causing) social policy issues; and
• How sociology is used in everyday life to explain the social behavior of people, and even predict what they will do.

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None

SOCI-001-03: INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY
Professor Becky Hsu
MW 11:00 am - 12:15 pm
Walsh 499

This course is an introduction to the field of sociology, the study of people in groups both small and large (or very large). How does being a flight attendant require the “selling” of one’s emotions? Rather than being a timeless institution of knowledge and technical expertise, how does the form and field of American medicine reflect historical and social power struggles? What kinds of organizational forms do urban gangs use? How does our environment change how likely we are to help someone else? These are some of the questions that we will explore as we look at a range of topics that engage sociologists today: social change, social networks, urban life, health and medicine, religion, emotions, sex and gender, the economy, and social inequality.

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None

SOCI-001-04: INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY
Professor Christine Schiwietz
TR 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm
Car Barn 202

SOCI-001-05: INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY
Professor Christine Schiwietz
TR 2:00 pm - 3:15 pm
Car Barn 201

To communicate the importance and excitement of the study of the social world! This course is designed to introduce students to the field of sociology, the exploration of society and how it operates. Sociology broadens social insights, fosters critical thinking, trains students in methods of gathering and analyzing data, and helps students develop their writing skills. By thinking actively about the issues facing contemporary society, students will learn to examine life situations and the influence of society and groups on people’s lives and the basic processes that shape social life. The course will introduce sociological perspectives (how issues of everyday life and activities) relate to the way society is structured and introduce socialization, culture, social institutions, social stratification, race and ethnicity, gender, politics, education and social change.

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Introduction to Sociology SOCI-001-130

Credits: 3
Cross Session
Distance
Day and Time

This course meets entirely online.

Sections:

SOCI 001-01: INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY
Professor Sarah Stiles
MW ...

Sections:

SOCI 001-01: INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY
Professor Sarah Stiles
MW 8:00am - 9:15am
Healy 104

SOCI 001-02: INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY
Professor Sarah Stiles
MW 9:30am - 10:45am
Healy 104

Sociology is the study of social life, social change, and the social causes and consequences of human behavior. Sociologists investigate the structure of groups, organizations, and societies, and how people interact within these contexts. (American Sociological Association, 2005)

In this course students will learn the basics of sociology through a variety of readings and film clips and "do" sociology with regular data workshops where they will test theories and recognize the social construction we all experience. By the end of the semester, students will be able to understand and explain:

• Basic concepts, generalizations, theories, and methods used in the study of sociology;
• The sociological focus and the influence the study of sociology has on identifying, explaining, and solving (or causing) social policy issues; and
• How sociology is used in everyday life to explain the social behavior of people, and even predict what they will do.

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None

SOCI-001-03: INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY
Professor Becky Hsu
MW 11:00 am - 12:15 pm
Walsh 499

This course is an introduction to the field of sociology, the study of people in groups both small and large (or very large). How does being a flight attendant require the “selling” of one’s emotions? Rather than being a timeless institution of knowledge and technical expertise, how does the form and field of American medicine reflect historical and social power struggles? What kinds of organizational forms do urban gangs use? How does our environment change how likely we are to help someone else? These are some of the questions that we will explore as we look at a range of topics that engage sociologists today: social change, social networks, urban life, health and medicine, religion, emotions, sex and gender, the economy, and social inequality.

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None

SOCI-001-04: INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY
Professor Christine Schiwietz
TR 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm
Car Barn 202

SOCI-001-05: INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY
Professor Christine Schiwietz
TR 2:00 pm - 3:15 pm
Car Barn 201

To communicate the importance and excitement of the study of the social world! This course is designed to introduce students to the field of sociology, the exploration of society and how it operates. Sociology broadens social insights, fosters critical thinking, trains students in methods of gathering and analyzing data, and helps students develop their writing skills. By thinking actively about the issues facing contemporary society, students will learn to examine life situations and the influence of society and groups on people’s lives and the basic processes that shape social life. The course will introduce sociological perspectives (how issues of everyday life and activities) relate to the way society is structured and introduce socialization, culture, social institutions, social stratification, race and ethnicity, gender, politics, education and social change.

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Introduction to Sociology SOCI-001-20

Credits: 3
Main Second Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Tue 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Wed 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Thu 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM

Sections:

SOCI 001-01: INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY
Professor Sarah Stiles
MW ...

Sections:

SOCI 001-01: INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY
Professor Sarah Stiles
MW 8:00am - 9:15am
Healy 104

SOCI 001-02: INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY
Professor Sarah Stiles
MW 9:30am - 10:45am
Healy 104

Sociology is the study of social life, social change, and the social causes and consequences of human behavior. Sociologists investigate the structure of groups, organizations, and societies, and how people interact within these contexts. (American Sociological Association, 2005)

In this course students will learn the basics of sociology through a variety of readings and film clips and "do" sociology with regular data workshops where they will test theories and recognize the social construction we all experience. By the end of the semester, students will be able to understand and explain:

• Basic concepts, generalizations, theories, and methods used in the study of sociology;
• The sociological focus and the influence the study of sociology has on identifying, explaining, and solving (or causing) social policy issues; and
• How sociology is used in everyday life to explain the social behavior of people, and even predict what they will do.

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None

SOCI-001-03: INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY
Professor Becky Hsu
MW 11:00 am - 12:15 pm
Walsh 499

This course is an introduction to the field of sociology, the study of people in groups both small and large (or very large). How does being a flight attendant require the “selling” of one’s emotions? Rather than being a timeless institution of knowledge and technical expertise, how does the form and field of American medicine reflect historical and social power struggles? What kinds of organizational forms do urban gangs use? How does our environment change how likely we are to help someone else? These are some of the questions that we will explore as we look at a range of topics that engage sociologists today: social change, social networks, urban life, health and medicine, religion, emotions, sex and gender, the economy, and social inequality.

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None

SOCI-001-04: INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY
Professor Christine Schiwietz
TR 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm
Car Barn 202

SOCI-001-05: INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY
Professor Christine Schiwietz
TR 2:00 pm - 3:15 pm
Car Barn 201

To communicate the importance and excitement of the study of the social world! This course is designed to introduce students to the field of sociology, the exploration of society and how it operates. Sociology broadens social insights, fosters critical thinking, trains students in methods of gathering and analyzing data, and helps students develop their writing skills. By thinking actively about the issues facing contemporary society, students will learn to examine life situations and the influence of society and groups on people’s lives and the basic processes that shape social life. The course will introduce sociological perspectives (how issues of everyday life and activities) relate to the way society is structured and introduce socialization, culture, social institutions, social stratification, race and ethnicity, gender, politics, education and social change.

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Social Problems SOCI-022-20

Credits: 3
Main Second Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 8:30 AM - 10:30 AM
  • Tue 8:30 AM - 10:30 AM
  • Wed 8:30 AM - 10:30 AM
  • Thu 8:30 AM - 10:30 AM

Social Problems will address the inefficiencies in our modern societies ...

Social Problems will address the inefficiencies in our modern societies to address the massive changes taking place in inequality, social organization and globalization. The class will address the creation of the virtual society and its impact on social organization, the role of the corporation and its impact on structures of inequality, and the institutions of a nation state diminishing in significance but humanity at the cusp of planning and organization from the citizen’s perspective. In addition, we will engage in research and analysis of traditional social problems and cases.
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Sociology of Gender SOCI-161-10

Credits: 3
Main First Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Tue 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Wed 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Thu 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM

TR 11:00am-12:15pm
Walsh 497

TR 11:00am-12:15pm
Walsh 497
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Education and Society SOCI-163-20

Credits: 3
Main Second Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Tue 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Wed 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Thu 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM

TR 9:30 - 10:45am
Car Barn 204

Schooling is ...

TR 9:30 - 10:45am
Car Barn 204

Schooling is a particular institutional form for educating and socializing young people. In this course, we will examine the social aspects of education and schooling in the United States; the interaction between home, society, and educational institutions; the ways that social inequalities are reproduced or ameliorated through schools; and the ways that identities are formed through education.

What role do schools play in society’s system of stratification? The core concern of the Sociology of Education as a field of inquiry is the role that schools play in relation to a given society’s system of stratification. That is the organizing frame for this course. We will review various theoretical perspectives on schools and inequality and then look historically at the evolution of formal education within the United States. We will note the link between schools and societal stratification, addressing how schools both contribute to social mobility and to the reproduction of the prevailing social order by focusing in part on the family and community context of children’s personal and academic development. We will then discuss the outcomes of schooling and how these outcomes are produced. Finally, we will consider sociological perspectives on contemporary education reform.

COURSE OBJECTIVES
The primary goal of this course is to understand the relationship between education and society. In order to achieve this goal, students will develop the tools necessary to analyze educational processes and practices through the sociological lens, an approach that incorporates individuals, groups, and institutions within its analytical frame. Using both theoretical and empirical texts, we will investigate questions about the role of schooling, the social structure of schools, stratification processes within and between schools, and the outcomes of education.
Among the many questions we will explore to this end this semester are: 1) How do schools help to maintain and perpetuate social inequality?; 2) How do factors of race, class, and gender affect the educational experiences of students both within and across schools?; 3) And what is the ultimate purpose of education and how can we as a society best achieve this purpose?

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
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CBL:Soc Entrpreneurship/Change SOCI-168-130

Credits: 4
Cross Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Tue 3:15 PM - 5:45 PM
  • Thu 3:15 PM - 5:45 PM

This is a hybrid course. Class will meet in person from June 6 through July 7 and then class will meet entirely online July 8 through July 29.

None
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Introductory Spanish I SPAN-003-10

Credits: 3
Main First Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Tue 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Wed 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Thu 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM

This course is for students with some prior high school ...

This course is for students with some prior high school knowledge of Spanish. Students will fulfill their needs to 1) develop their ability to communicate satisfactorily in Spanish in everyday practical situations that may occur either here in the U.S or abroad, 2) to acquire some of the skills necessary for effective reading in Spanish, and 3) to write Spanish with a satisfactory level of accuracy. Students will be exposed to aspects of Hispanic culture via videos and written texts. Three key components that will assist students to attain these three goals are vocabulary, language awareness, and practice/participation.
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Introductory Spanish II SPAN-004-20

Credits: 3
Main Second Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Tue 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Wed 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Thu 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM

This course is a continuation of SPAN 001/003 in ...

This course is a continuation of SPAN 001/003 in which students will further fulfill their needs to 1) develop their ability to communicate satisfactorily in Spanish in everyday practical situations that may occur either here in the U.S or abroad, 2) to acquire some of the skills necessary for effective reading in Spanish, and 3) to write Spanish with a satisfactory level of accuracy. Students will be exposed to aspects of Hispanic culture via videos and written texts. Three key components that will assist students to attain these three goals are vocabulary, language awareness, and practice/participation.
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Intensive Basic Spanish SPAN-011-10

Credits: 6
Main First Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 9:30 AM - 12:40 PM
  • Tue 9:30 AM - 12:40 PM
  • Wed 9:30 AM - 12:40 PM
  • Thu 9:30 AM - 12:40 PM
  • Fri 9:30 AM - 12:40 PM

Please contact the Summer and Special Programs Office at (202) 687-8700 for more information.

Along with Intensive Intermediate Spanish, this course was originally developed ...

Along with Intensive Intermediate Spanish, this course was originally developed for FLL students and therefore assumes a certain level of motivation to learn languages. The course aims to develop students' ability to communicate in Spanish and to help them acquire the skills necessary to understand oral and written texts. Different aspects of Hispanic culture will be introduced in reading passages and videos. Grading criteria are based on lexical breadth, grammatical accuracy, reading and listening comprehension skills, and a basic knowledge of Spanish-speaking areas.
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Intermediate Spanish I SPAN-021-10

Credits: 3
Main First Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Tue 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Wed 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Thu 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM

Visiting students must take a placement test prior to registering for this course. Please contact the Summer and Special Programs Office at (202) 687-8700 for more information.

In this intermediate course, students will reinforce their knowledge of ...

In this intermediate course, students will reinforce their knowledge of the first year courses and further develop their ability to 1) communicate satisfactorily in Spanish in everyday practical situations that may occur either here in the U.S or abroad, 2) continue acquiring some of the skills necessary for effective reading in Spanish, and 3) write Spanish with a satisfactory level of accuracy. Students will be exposed to aspects of Hispanic culture and literature via movies and written texts. Three key components that will assist students to attain these three goals are vocabulary, language awareness, and practice/participation.
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Intermediate Spanish II SPAN-022-20

Credits: 3
Main Second Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Tue 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Wed 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Thu 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM

Visiting students must take a placement test prior to registering for this course. Please contact the Summer and Special Programs Office at (202) 687-8700 for more information.

This course is a continuation of SPAN 021 that further ...

This course is a continuation of SPAN 021 that further develops students’ ability to 1) communicate satisfactorily in Spanish in everyday practical situations that may occur either here in the U.S or abroad, 2) continue acquiring some of the skills necessary for effective reading in Spanish, and 3) write Spanish with a satisfactory level of accuracy. Students will be exposed to aspects of Hispanic culture and literature via movies and written texts. Three key components that will assist students to attain these three goals are vocabulary, language awareness, and practice/participation.
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Intensive Intermediate Spanish SPAN-032-20

Credits: 6
Main Second Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 9:30 AM - 12:30 PM
  • Tue 9:30 AM - 12:30 PM
  • Wed 9:30 AM - 12:30 PM
  • Thu 9:30 AM - 12:30 PM
  • Fri 9:30 AM - 12:30 PM

Visiting students must take a placement test prior to registering for this course. Please contact the Summer and Special Programs Office at (202) 687-8700 for more information.

Continuing from Intensive Basic Spanish, and designed for highly motivated ...

Continuing from Intensive Basic Spanish, and designed for highly motivated students who seek daily contact with the language, this course is designed to further develop students' ability to communicate satisfactorily in Spanish in everyday situations and to help them acquire skills necessary for effective speaking and writing in Spanish. Taking readings, documentaries and films as point of departure, the cultural component of the course grows significantly to include current issues encompassing the economy, politics, and culture of the Spanish-speaking areas on both sides of the Atlantic.
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Advanced Spanish I SPAN-103-10

Credits: 3
Main First Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Tue 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Wed 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Thu 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM

Visiting students must take a placement test prior to registering for this course. Please contact the Summer and Special Programs Office at (202) 687-8700 for more information.

At this advanced level, students will review and expand the ...

At this advanced level, students will review and expand the basic structures of Spanish with special emphasis on more difficult grammatical aspects, develop more formal vocabulary, and further improve both oral and written skills. Students will broaden their understanding of several aspects of Hispanic culture and literature via movies and written texts. Four key components that will assist students to attain these goals are grammar, vocabulary, language awareness, and practice/participation.
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Advanced Spanish II SPAN-104-20

Credits: 3
Main Second Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Tue 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Wed 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Thu 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM

Visiting students must take a placement test prior to registering for this course. Please contact the Summer and Special Programs Office at (202) 687-8700 for more information.

Students will continue to review and expand the basic structures ...

Students will continue to review and expand the basic structures of Spanish with special emphasis on more difficult grammatical aspects not covered in SPAN 103, develop more formal vocabulary, and further improve both oral and written skills. Students will broaden their understanding of several aspects of Hispanic culture and literature via movies and written texts. Four key components that will assist students to attain these goals are grammar, vocabulary, language awareness, and practice/participation.
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Teaching Spanish SPAN-392-20

Credits: 3
Main Second Session
Seminar
Day and Time
  • Mon 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Tue 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Wed 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Thu 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM

If you are considering Teach for America, teaching Spanish in ...

If you are considering Teach for America, teaching Spanish in a private school or working in a bilingual school, Teaching Spanish is the course for you. It is divided into two parts, one devoted to the fundamental concepts of second language learning and teaching and a second that applies these concepts to L2 reading, listening, speaking, writing, as well as testing. Topics include an introduction to cognitive theories of language learning; teaching approaches, methods, and related techniques; the role of explicit instruction and input; classroom interaction and materials preparation. Students will be assessed through oral presentations, two examinations, observations, and the development of teaching materials. Students will be able to test their materials and skills in an after school program that offers Spanish classes at a DC school close to campus. These activities will count towards the Community-based Credit Learning Program.

The course fulfills one of the linguistics requirements for the Spanish major as well as the College social science requirement, and counts towards the minor in education.

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International Business STRT-261-20

Credits: 3
Main Second Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Tue 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Wed 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Thu 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM

A first course in the theory and practice of international ...

A first course in the theory and practice of international business. After building a foundation of international trade, foreign direct investment, exchange rates, and government policy, the course emphasis is on the application of concepts to the solution of international business problems. It focuses on areas such as international market entry, the internationalization of the marketing, finance and management functions within the firm, and the development of global business strategies.
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Social Responsibility of Bus STRT-282-10

Credits: 3
Main First Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Tue 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Wed 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Thu 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM

This purpose of this course is to enhance your appreciation ...

This purpose of this course is to enhance your appreciation for, and ability to deal with, the ethical and legal problems you will face in your careers as managers. The course is designed to teach you how to deal with the ethical and legal dilemmas that can arise in the business context. Please note the emphasis on the word ‘how.’ This indicates that you will be required to master a method for solving problems rather than simply learn and remember a stock set of answers.

It is important for you to appreciate this distinction. In many of your courses you are required to understand a conceptually complex set of materials and demonstrate your understanding on examinations or in papers. This is not such a course. In this course, your job is to master a skill; specifically, the skill of normative problem-solving. More precisely, you will be required to develop three closely related abilities: 1) the ability to identify and analyze the ethical and legal problems that can confront you in business situations, 2) the ability to derive a solution to these problems, and 3) the ability to communicate the justification for your solution to others.

The above implies that you should not expect to be provided with answers to the problems we will be examining. In fact, we will often close our discussion of a problem without achieving any definitive resolution. The success of this course should not be measured by the number of ethical or legal problems that we resolve during the semester, but by the degree of confidence you feel at its conclusion in your ability to deal with the unexpected and unexamined normative dilemmas that may confront you in your professional life.
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The Problem of God THEO-001-10

Credits: 3
Main First Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Tue 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Wed 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Thu 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM

An examination of the religious dimension of human experience and ...

An examination of the religious dimension of human experience and consciousness in relation to a number of problems and challenges: the problem of knowledge; the relation of faith and reason; various historical, social and existential determinants of belief; the challenge of atheism and humanism; the impact of secularization on religion.
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The Problem of God THEO-001-20

Credits: 3
Main Second Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 8:30 AM - 10:30 AM
  • Tue 8:30 AM - 10:30 AM
  • Wed 8:30 AM - 10:30 AM
  • Thu 8:30 AM - 10:30 AM

An examination of the religious dimension of human experience and ...

An examination of the religious dimension of human experience and consciousness in relation to a number of problems and challenges: the problem of knowledge; the relation of faith and reason; various historical, social and existential determinants of belief; the challenge of atheism and humanism; the impact of secularization on religion.
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Intro to Biblical Literature THEO-011-01

Credits: 3
Main Presession
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Tue 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Wed 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Thu 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Fri 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM

An introductory study of 1) the books of the Bible ...

An introductory study of 1) the books of the Bible, 2) the history of Ancient Israel and first-century Christianity, and 3) the process of formation and transmission of the faith traditions coming to literary expression in the biblical literature.
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Intro to Biblical Literature THEO-011-20

Credits: 3
Main Second Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Tue 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Wed 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Thu 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM

An introductory study of 1) the books of the Bible ...

An introductory study of 1) the books of the Bible, 2) the history of Ancient Israel and first-century Christianity, and 3) the process of formation and transmission of the faith traditions coming to literary expression in the biblical literature.
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Blacks and Jews in America THEO-012-20

Credits: 3
Main Second Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Tue 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Wed 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Thu 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM

This course offers a constructive, interdisciplinary approach to examining the ...

This course offers a constructive, interdisciplinary approach to examining the competing and overlapping ways Blacks and Jews in America imagine, cultivate and perform their religious and cultural identities. Although the groups emerge in the American context with unique histories and traditions, there is an overwhelming popular belief that Blacks and Jews share, at least historically, a special relationship. Drawing on primary, secondary, visual and material resources, students will investigate the nature of this relationship and examine how Blacks and Jews retrieve religion, tradition and ethics to interrogate, explore and, in some cases, expand definitions of democracy, political liberalism, freedom, citizenship and community. Writers under examination include James Baldwin, Abraham Heschel, Karen Brodkin, Martin Luther King, Jr., Michael Staub and Alice Walker.
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Rel in American Political Life THEO-099-10

Credits: 3
Main First Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Tue 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Wed 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Thu 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM

Acting I TPST-120-20

Credits: 3
Main Second Session
Studio
Day and Time
  • Mon 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Tue 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Wed 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Thu 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM

Students must attend classes the first week. Course will meet in the Davis Devine Theatre.

Taught by experts in the field, Acting I provides an ...

Taught by experts in the field, Acting I provides an experiential introduction to the study of acting for the stage based in psychological and physical realism. Emphasis is placed on the critical and creative theories and techniques to cultivate imagination, focus, embodied creativity, self-awareness, vocal range, collaboration, and script analysis. Acting projects include scenes, monologues, and acting exercises. Students will fulfill readings (e.g. by Stanislavski and Uta Hagen), writing assignments, and performance projects. Suitable for students with considerable performance experience but without college coursework in acting, and for complete beginners.

Theater Lab Fee $50
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Intersections UNXP-030-130

Credits: 1
Cross Session
Distance
Day and Time

Students will need to submit an application for this course. Please see instructor for more information and permission to register. This is a CBL course.

None
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Intro Women's/Gender Studies WGST-140-10

Credits: 3
Main First Session
Seminar
Day and Time
  • Mon 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Tue 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Wed 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Thu 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM

This course is a multicultural, interdisciplinary introduction to some of ...

This course is a multicultural, interdisciplinary introduction to some of the major concepts and political issues surrounding gender and society. We will explore the manner in which ‘gender’ intersects with race, sexuality, nationality, class and other identities to shape systems of power that contribute to and reinforce inequality. Through an investigation of popular culture, media, scholarly works, and discussion, we will explore how representation as objects, consumers, subjects, creators, challengers, and critics both reflect and produce ideas about femininity and masculinity. This course will provide students with tools to critique power structures and aims to empower students to explore the possibility of change.
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Intro to Sexuality Studies WGST-141-130

Credits: 3
Cross Session
Distance
Day and Time

This course meets entirely online.

This course provides an introduction to the vibrant and interdisciplinary ...

This course provides an introduction to the vibrant and interdisciplinary field of sexuality studies. Sexuality studies examines the social construction of sexual desires, practices, and identities, and investigates the ways in which sexuality is connected to power and inequality. We will begin the course by exploring some key theories and concepts within the field, and situate them alongside the history of LGBTQ activism in the United States and elsewhere. We will then consider how these concepts can be applied to a variety of contemporary issues such as sexual identity and the state, same-sex marriage, representations of sexuality in popular culture and the media, transnational sexualities and sexual identities and consumerism. Throughout the course, we will examine how sexuality intersects with other social categories such as gender, race, class, nationality, age and ability/disability.



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Gender, Race, and Feminism WGST-238-10

Credits: 3
Main First Session
Seminar
Day and Time
  • Mon 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Tue 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Wed 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Thu 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM

This course will explore the intersection of gender and race ...

This course will explore the intersection of gender and race and other components of social identity from an interdisciplinary perspective. We will address the inter and intra relationship of women of color with feminism, locally and globally. While examining theories and bodies of knowledge, we will analyze how historical and contemporary realities of women of color are influenced by a legacy of structural inequalities. Students will learn the importance of applying knowledge from a variety of theoretical and political standpoints. The approach to this course will pay particular attention to sociological aspects of identity as well as cultural representations that are manifestations of systems of oppression. This course aims to move us from being limited in feminist theory and text as a variation on the theme of “woman” or being a component in referencing gender, race, class, and sexuality, into the realization that it is possible not only to hope for but also to make change.
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