Undergraduate Courses

Get ahead this summer with over 250 courses and 35 subject areas to choose from. Summer is the perfect time to fulfill your education requirements while experiencing all that DC and Georgetown University has to offer.

You may find course descriptions through the Registrar's Office class search page. Simply use the drop down boxes to search for your summer course and click "Class Search." When you find your course, click on "View Course Description."

View Courses

Displaying 191 courses

Accounting I ACCT-101-10

Credits: 3
1st Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Tue 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Thu 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
 
Lecture
  • Mon 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Wed 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM

Syllabus: Click here to download syllabus

This course is an introduction to financial accounting. Financial accounting ...

This course is an introduction to financial accounting. Financial accounting is the process through which an organization reports financial information to interested parties. In other words, it is the language of business. The information is used for decision-making purposes by managers, investors, bankers, labor unions, suppliers, etc. In this class, you will learn how to prepare, analyze and use financial accounting information.
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Accounting II ACCT-102-20

Credits: 3
2nd Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Tue 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Wed 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Thu 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM

This course is designed to give you, as a manager ...

This course is designed to give you, as a manager in a non-accounting job, the fundamental vocabulary, concepts and procedures to work with management accountants in an informed way to answer questions like these: How effectively are my actions linked with corporate strategy? What activities of mine are differentiating and add value? What are my commodity activities that either destroy value or waste resources? How do I analyze the way a cost is accumulated to make sure it is relevant to a specific decision I must make? How do organizational control and incentive systems affect the motivation levels and actions of people who report to me?

In short, understanding the fundamental vocabulary, concepts and procedures of management accounting will help you
a. grow revenues and profits while planning and controlling related expenses
b. manage risks
c. understand, measure and drive performance
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Business Law ACCT-181-01

Credits: 3
Presession
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Tue 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Wed 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Thu 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Fri 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM

In Business Law, we will study some of the basic ...

In Business Law, we will study some of the basic concepts that underlie the American legal system. In particular, we will study the source and application of various types of laws, the court system and elements of constitutional law, torts, product liability, contracts, and sales. These concepts will be applied to issues that arise in a business context. Emphasis will be placed on legal problem solving, i.e., applying principles to given sets of facts and drawing legal conclusions.
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Black (Pop) Culture & Politics AFAM-220-01

Credits: 3
Presession
Seminar
Day and Time
  • Mon 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Tue 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Wed 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Thu 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Fri 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM

In this course we will examine the relationships that black ...

In this course we will examine the relationships that black (popular) culture has to black political activity by foregrounding how formal and informal politics mutually constitute each other. As Gene Jarrett explains, formal politics refers to “governmental activity, public policy, law and social formations,” while informal politics refers to “cultural media, representation and subjectivity” (Representing the Race). Throughout our examination of different aspects of black (popular) culture, we will consider how these various cultural modes of performance implicitly and explicitly shape black political activity. As we historicize black cultural modes of expressivity, we will consider how, for example, did rhythm and blues song performances during the 1960s shape black political consciousness during the Civil Rights and Black Power Movements. In our examination of the politics of gender during the 1970s era, we will think energetically about how the Blaxploitation film era’s representations of black gender and sexuality resulted in social formations that undermined black political progress. In terms of cultural media to be examined, televangelism, reality television, self-help television shows, rhythm and blues music, film, magazines, and political television and radio shows will serve as our primary cultural sources to explore how black (popular) culture negotiates, complicates, severs, and reaffirms the relationship that exists between formal and informal politics. We will draw upon the methodologies of cultural studies, black religious studies, black gender and sexuality studies, civil rights historiography, literary studies, film studies, and African American Studies to assist us in our scholarly inquiry. We will pay keen attention to the intersections of race, class, gender, and sexuality in our discussions of the politics of blackness, aiming to understand better the variety of political interests and concerns that constitute the too often simplified categories of “black” and “black political interests.” Students should expect quizzes, examinations, presentations, papers, class participation, and a final research project as parts of their assessment in the course.
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Intens 1st Lev Mod Stand Arb I ARAB-011-10

Credits: 6
1st Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 8:30 AM - 11:55 AM
  • Tue 8:30 AM - 11:55 AM
  • Wed 8:30 AM - 11:55 AM
  • Thu 8:30 AM - 11:55 AM
  • Fri 8:30 AM - 11:55 AM

Not for native speakers of Arabic. There is no pass/fail option for this course. Please contact the Summer and Special Programs Office at (202) 687-8200 for more information.

This intensive multi-media course focuses on developing proficiency in the ...

This intensive multi-media course focuses on developing proficiency in the standard written Arabic language, as well as formal spoken Arabic. It begins with learning of script and phonology, and works rapidly into a wide range of situation-based texts and topics that build vocabulary, grammar, and general communicative competence.
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Intens 1st Lev Mod Stand Arb I ARAB-011-11

Credits: 6
1st Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 8:30 AM - 11:55 AM
  • Tue 8:30 AM - 11:55 AM
  • Wed 8:30 AM - 11:55 AM
  • Thu 8:30 AM - 11:55 AM
  • Fri 8:30 AM - 11:55 AM

Not for native speakers of Arabic. There is no pass/fail option for this course. Please contact the Summer and Special Programs Office at (202) 687-8200 for more information.

This intensive multi-media course focuses on developing proficiency in the ...

This intensive multi-media course focuses on developing proficiency in the standard written Arabic language, as well as formal spoken Arabic. It begins with learning of script and phonology, and works rapidly into a wide range of situation-based texts and topics that build vocabulary, grammar, and general communicative competence.
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Intens 1st Lv Mod Stnd Arab II ARAB-012-20

Credits: 6
2nd Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 8:30 AM - 11:55 AM
  • Tue 8:30 AM - 11:55 AM
  • Wed 8:30 AM - 11:55 AM
  • Thu 8:30 AM - 11:55 AM
  • Fri 8:30 AM - 11:55 AM

Requires the successful completion of ARAB-011 or permission of instructor. There is no pass/option for this course. Please contact the Summer and Special Programs Office at (202) 687-8200 for more information. Visiting students must take a placement test prior to registering for this course.

This intensive multi-media course focuses on developing proficiency in the ...

This intensive multi-media course focuses on developing proficiency in the standard written Arabic language, as well as formal spoken Arabic. It begins with learning of script and phonology, and works rapidly into a wide range of situation-based texts and topics that build vocabulary, grammar, and general communicative competence.
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Intens 2nd Lvl Md Stnd Arab I ARAB-111-10

Credits: 6
1st Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Tue 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Wed 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Thu 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Fri 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM

Requires successful completion of ARAB 012 or permission of instructor. There is no pass/fail option for this course. Visiting students must take a placement test prior to registering for this course. Please contact the Summer and Special Programs Office at (22) 687-8200 for more information.

This intensive multi-media course covers topics and situations relating to ...

This intensive multi-media course covers topics and situations relating to contemporary Arabic media, literature and culture. Focus is on acquisition of more complex grammatical structures, expanding vocabulary and discourse skills, and on developing competence in a wide range of communicative situations.
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Intens 2nd Lv Mod Stnd Arab II ARAB-112-20

Credits: 6
2nd Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Tue 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Wed 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Thu 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Fri 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM

Requires successful completion of ARAB 111 or permission of instructor. There is no pass/fail option for this course. Visiting students must take a placement test prior to registering for this course. Please contact the Summer and Special Programs Office at (202) 687-8200 for more information.

This intensive multi-media course covers topics and situations relating to ...

This intensive multi-media course covers topics and situations relating to contemporary Arabic media, literature and culture. Focus is on acquisition of more complex grammatical structures, expanding vocabulary and discourse skills, and on developing competence in a wide range of communicative situations.
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Formal Spoken Arabic I ARAB-113-10

Credits: 3
1st Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Tue 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Wed 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Thu 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM

Requires successful completion of ARAB 012 or permission of instructor. There is no pass/fail option for this course. Visiting students must take a placement test prior to registering for this course. Please contact the Summer and Special Programs Office at (202) 687-8200 for more information.

This course is intended to increase spoken Arabic proficiency through ...

This course is intended to increase spoken Arabic proficiency through focusing on intensive practice of interactive functional skills necessary in communicative situations, such as vocabulary retention and retrieval, listening comprehension, and fundamental conversation strategies. It assumes some knowledge of Arabic script and grammatical structure and is designed to enable nonnative speakers of Arabic to communicate actively and appropriately with educated native speakers on a wide range of topics. Prerequisite: at least one year of Modern Standard Arabic.
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Formal Spoken Arabic II ARAB-114-20

Credits: 3
2nd Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Tue 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Wed 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Thu 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM

Requires successful completion of ARAB 112 or ARAB 113 permission of instructor. There is no pass/fail option for this course. Visiting students must take a placement test prior to registering for this course. Please contact the Summer and Special Programs Office at (202) 687-8200 for more information.

This course is intended to increase spoken Arabic proficiency through ...

This course is intended to increase spoken Arabic proficiency through focusing on intensive practice of interactive functional skills necessary in communicative situations, such as vocabulary retention and retrieval, listening comprehension, and fundamental conversation strategies. It assumes some knowledge of Arabic script and grammatical structure and is designed to enable nonnative speakers of Arabic to communicate actively and appropriately with educated native speakers on a wide range of topics. Prerequisite: at least one year of Modern Standard Arabic.
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Intens 3rd Lvl Md Stnd Arab I ARAB-215-10

Credits: 6
1st Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Tue 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Wed 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Thu 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Fri 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM

Requires successful completion of ARAB-112, permission of instructor or successful completion of placement test. There is no pass/fail option for this course. Please contact the Summer and Special Programs Office at (202) 687-8200 for more information. This section has a grammar focus and requires additional conversation hours outside of class.

This is an intensive, largely media-based course focusing on developing ...

This is an intensive, largely media-based course focusing on developing proficiency in reading and discussion of texts in international relations, history, Islam, and current affairs. In addition to extensive reading, it includes composition exercises, review of Arabic grammar, listening skills, and conversation practice.
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Intens 3rd Lvl Md Stnd Arab I ARAB-215-11

Credits: 6
1st Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Tue 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Wed 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Thu 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Fri 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM

Requires successful completion of ARAB 112 or permission of instructor. There is no pass/fail option for this course. Visiting students must take a placement test prior to registering for this course. Please contact the Summer and Special Programs Office at (202) 687-8200 for more information.

This is an intensive, largely media-based course focusing on developing ...

This is an intensive, largely media-based course focusing on developing proficiency in reading and discussion of texts in international relations, history, Islam, and current affairs. In addition to extensive reading, it includes composition exercises, review of Arabic grammar, listening skills, and conversation practice.
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Intens 3rd Lvl Md Stnd Arab II ARAB-216-20

Credits: 6
2nd Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Tue 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Wed 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Thu 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Fri 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM

Requires successful completion of ARAB-215, permission of instructor or successful completion of placement test. There is no pass/fail option for this course. Please contact the Summer and Special Programs Office at (202) 687-8200 for more information. This section has a grammar focus and requires additional conversation hours outside of class.

This is an intensive, largely media-based course focusing on developing ...

This is an intensive, largely media-based course focusing on developing proficiency in reading and discussion of texts in international relations, history, Islam, and current affairs. In addition to extensive reading, it includes composition exercises, review of Arabic grammar, listening skills, and conversation practice.
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Intens 3rd Lvl Md Stnd Arab II ARAB-216-21

Credits: 6
2nd Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Tue 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Wed 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Thu 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Fri 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM

Requires successful completion of ARAB 215 or permission of instructor. There is no pass/fail option for this course. Visiting students must take a placement test prior to registering for this course. Please contact the Summer and Special Programs Office at (202) 687-8200 for more information.

This is an intensive, largely media-based course focusing on developing ...

This is an intensive, largely media-based course focusing on developing proficiency in reading and discussion of texts in international relations, history, Islam, and current affairs. In addition to extensive reading, it includes composition exercises, review of Arabic grammar, listening skills, and conversation practice.
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Renaissance to Modern Art ARTH-102-10

Credits: 3
1st Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Tue 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Wed 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Thu 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM

This course surveys the major achievements in western pictorial art ...

This course surveys the major achievements in western pictorial art, sculpture and architecture from the early Renaissance to the twentieth century. Students will develop skills in analyzing and interpreting original works of art. Fall and Spring.
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Drawing I:Visual Language ARTS-110-20

Credits: 3
2nd Summer Session
Laboratory
Day and Time
  • Mon 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Tue 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Wed 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Thu 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM

Students are required to work on their studio projects one hour outside of class for every hour scheduled in class.

The various disciplines, techniques, and theories of drawing will be ...

The various disciplines, techniques, and theories of drawing will be studied as the student learns to train his or her hand, eye and imagination in the assigned practical problems of drawing. Students enrolled in Studio courses must devote a minimum of 4 - 6 hours per week outside of class to develop and complete assignments. These times are flexible and can be rearranged with the instructor. No prerequisite. Fall and Spring.

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Intro to Printmaking ARTS-120-10

Credits: 3
1st Summer Session
Laboratory
Day and Time
  • Mon 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Tue 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Wed 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Thu 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM

Students are required to work on their studio projects one hour outside of class for every hour scheduled in class.

This course is designed for beginning to advanced students who ...

This course is designed for beginning to advanced students who wish to experience traditional “hands on” printmaking methods and materials. The course is excellent for studio and art history majors. The basic printmaking techniques covered include; Intaglio, the favorite of Rembrandt, which covers etching and drypoint on copper and zinc, Lithography on stone, as Whistler and Picasso practiced, and Relief on linoleum and wood in the manner of Rockwell Kent and Hiroshege. Students will do assigned test prints in each technique and develop their own personal imagery using the method of their choice.
Museum and Gallery visits are required.

No prerequisite
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Photography I ARTS-130-20

Credits: 3
2nd Summer Session
Laboratory
Day and Time
  • Mon 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Tue 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Wed 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Thu 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM

Students are required to work on their studio projects one hour outside of class for every hour scheduled in class.

Basic Photography is a studio art course designed to develop ...

Basic Photography is a studio art course designed to develop the hands-on skills necessary to produce and identify the elements of a good photograph and to acquire a thorough working knowledge of film and digital equipment. Students will gain an understanding of the aesthetic and technical areas of photography as a fine art. Class lectures, discussions and darkroom lab assignments will deal with photographic composition, criticism and history, camera and lens types, film types, and film and paper development systems. Fundamental knowledge of computer programs such as Photoshop will be introduced later in the semester to combine and enhance photographic imagery. Students enrolled in Studio courses must devote a minimum of 4 - 6 hours per week outside of class to develop and complete assignments. These times are flexible and can be rearranged with the instructor.
Fall and Spring.

No prerequisite.
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Painting I: Oil ARTS-150-10

Credits: 3
1st Summer Session
Laboratory
Day and Time
  • Mon 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Tue 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Wed 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Thu 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM

Students are required to work on their studio projects one hour outside of class for every hour scheduled in class.

This course is an introduction to the materials and techniques ...

This course is an introduction to the materials and techniques used in painting, with an emphasis on oils. It will cover mastery of technique, composition and color as vehicles for individual expression.

Fall and Spring.

No prerequisite.
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Intro to Graphic Design ARTS-162-01

Credits: 3
Presession
Laboratory
Day and Time
  • Mon 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Tue 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Wed 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Thu 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Fri 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM

Students are required to work on their studio projects one hour outside of class for every hour scheduled in class.

This course is an introduction to graphic design. Students will ...

This course is an introduction to graphic design. Students will learn the formal, aesthetic and communicative aspects of creating effective graphic images. Students will learn to use a range of graphic software tools. Projects will include logos, product packaging and other design challenges as experiences that will promote mastery of technique, methods and materials. The goal in this class is to strengthen a students' visual literacy and communication skills as part of their liberal arts education.
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Ecology & the Environment BIOL-008-10

Credits: 3
1st Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Tue 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Wed 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Thu 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM

At a time when we face a number of serious ...

At a time when we face a number of serious environmental challenges, an understanding of ecology is important. The objectives of this course are to provide nonscience majors with an introduction to ecologic concepts and to discuss several important environmental issues using books and articles written for a general audience. In Part 1 (what an ecologist wants to know), we will discuss how a forest works, scientific observation, global patterns, lake ecology, and evaluation of environmental quality. In Part 2, we will study how global climate change is altering specific ecologic systems. In Part 3, we discuss the impact of invasive species especially on islands. In Part 4, we will read and discuss a recent book on another ecologic topic. This course satisfies the general education requirement for a science course and is not open to students majoring in a science. [Not recommended for students who have taken BIOL-016.]
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Found in Biology I BIOL-105-20

Credits: 3
2nd Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 8:15 AM - 10:15 AM
  • Tue 8:15 AM - 10:15 AM
  • Thu 8:15 AM - 10:15 AM
  • Fri 8:15 AM - 10:15 AM

Found in Biology II BIOL-106-10

Credits: 3
1st Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 8:15 AM - 10:15 AM
  • Tue 8:15 AM - 10:15 AM
  • Thu 8:15 AM - 10:15 AM
  • Fri 8:15 AM - 10:15 AM

Found in Biology I-Lab BIOL-115-20

Credits: 2
2nd Summer Session
Laboratory
Day and Time
  • Mon 10:30 AM - 1:10 PM
  • Tue 10:30 AM - 1:10 PM
  • Thu 10:30 AM - 1:10 PM
  • Fri 10:30 AM - 1:10 PM

Students must also register for BIOL 105-20.

None
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Found in Biology II-Lab BIOL-116-10

Credits: 2
1st Summer Session
Laboratory
Day and Time
  • Mon 10:30 AM - 1:10 PM
  • Tue 10:30 AM - 1:10 PM
  • Thu 10:30 AM - 1:10 PM
  • Fri 10:30 AM - 1:10 PM

Students must also register for BIOL 106-10.

None
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Mammalian Physiology BIOL-175-10

Credits: 3
1st Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Tue 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Wed 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Thu 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM

This course must be taken with BIOL-176-10.

This course will explore function and regulation of all of ...

This course will explore function and regulation of all of the major systems of the mammalian body, most of it related to humans. For many systems, structure and function are intimately related and these relationships will be detailed especially in the nervous, muscular, circulatory, pulmonary, excretory and digestive systems. How these systems serve to maintain homeostasis will be a unifying theme throughout the course.

This course fulfills the "Cells and Systems" distribution requirement for Biology majors. It was previous offered as BIOL-208.
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Mammalian Physiology Lab BIOL-176-10

Credits: 1
1st Summer Session
Laboratory
Day and Time
  • Mon 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Tue 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Wed 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Thu 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM

This course must be taken with BIOL-175-10.

None
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General Chemistry Lecture I CHEM-001-10

Credits: 3
1st Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 8:10 AM - 10:10 AM
  • Tue 8:10 AM - 10:10 AM
  • Wed 8:10 AM - 10:10 AM
  • Thu 8:10 AM - 10:10 AM

This course must be taken with CHEM-009.

An intensive course for science majors or students with suitable ...

An intensive course for science majors or students with suitable math/science backgrounds. Properties of substances; fundamental principles and theories of chemistry; selected applications to biochemistry, chemistry of the biosphere, and recent advances in chemistry. Concurrent: 009. Fall.
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General Chemistry Lec II CHEM-002-20

Credits: 3
2nd Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 8:10 AM - 10:10 AM
  • Tue 8:10 AM - 10:10 AM
  • Wed 8:10 AM - 10:10 AM
  • Thu 8:10 AM - 10:10 AM

This course must be taken with CHEM-010.

CHEM-002 is the second semester of a two semester General ...

CHEM-002 is the second semester of a two semester General Chemistry Lecture sequence and receives 3 credits. CHEM-002 is taken concurrently with General Chemistry II Laboratory (CHEM-010) and is a prerequisite for Organic Chemistry Lecture I (CHEM-117). In this course the following topics will be covered: intermolecular forces, liquids, solids, properties of solutions, chemical kinetics, chemical equilibrium, acid-base chemistry, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, coordination chemistry, nuclear chemistry and chemistry of environment. Concurrent: 010. Prerequisite: 001. Spring.
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General Chemistry Lab I CHEM-009-10

Credits: 2
1st Summer Session
Laboratory
Day and Time
  • Mon 12:10 PM - 2:45 PM
  • Tue 12:10 PM - 2:45 PM
  • Wed 12:10 PM - 2:45 PM
  • Thu 12:10 PM - 2:45 PM
 
Recitation
  • Mon 10:15 AM - 11:25 AM
  • Tue 10:15 AM - 11:25 AM
  • Wed 10:15 AM - 11:25 AM
  • Thu 10:15 AM - 11:25 AM

This course must be taken with CHEM-001.

Coherent with the lecture course, this class aims to provide ...

Coherent with the lecture course, this class aims to provide a foundation in Chemistry, specific to the laboratory experience. Where the lecture introduces, explores, and expands concepts, through a dialogue with the lecture professor; the laboratory is where the students are the active participant: performing experiments, collecting data, analyzing data, and conveying their findings through written reports. The lecture and the lab act in concert, in synergy, where the student achieves a holistic understanding of Chemistry, of science. This is the scientific process – idea, testing, refinement, and understanding/discovery. This is what scientists do, this is what professors do. All these aspects embody the knowledge and the skills students are expected to learn and master on finishing a year of Gen Chem. A few examples of what students attain in this course:
• Knowledge, understanding, command of introductory concepts & pinnacles of chemistry (reactions, stoichiometry, thermodynamics, atomic theory, etc.)
• Skills: problem-solving, writing science reports, math, working/interacting in groups…
• Acquire and develop common lab techniques, practices, and safety requirements
• Relating chemical concepts to the real world
• Applying & innovating learned material to new or unseen situations
• Ability to utilize and transfer learned ideas and techniques to upper division science courses
Chem-009 is composed of two parts: lab and recitation. Students will be in the lab performing an experiment on a weekly basis. The first lab period focuses on check-in and safety, which is first and foremost the most important. Recitation is a time where students can ask questions pertaining to the lecture portion of General Chemistry and about previous and upcoming lab experiments. Recitation meets twice a week, with one preceding the lab.
Concurrent: 001. Fall.
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General Chemistry Lab I CHEM-009-12

Credits: 2
1st Summer Session
Laboratory
Day and Time
  • Mon 12:10 PM - 2:45 PM
  • Tue 12:10 PM - 2:45 PM
  • Wed 12:10 PM - 2:45 PM
  • Thu 12:10 PM - 2:45 PM
 
Recitation
  • Mon 10:15 AM - 11:25 AM
  • Tue 10:15 AM - 11:25 AM
  • Wed 10:15 AM - 11:25 AM
  • Thu 10:15 AM - 11:25 AM

This course must be taken with CHEM-001.

Coherent with the lecture course, this class aims to provide ...

Coherent with the lecture course, this class aims to provide a foundation in Chemistry, specific to the laboratory experience. Where the lecture introduces, explores, and expands concepts, through a dialogue with the lecture professor; the laboratory is where the students are the active participant: performing experiments, collecting data, analyzing data, and conveying their findings through written reports. The lecture and the lab act in concert, in synergy, where the student achieves a holistic understanding of Chemistry, of science. This is the scientific process – idea, testing, refinement, and understanding/discovery. This is what scientists do, this is what professors do. All these aspects embody the knowledge and the skills students are expected to learn and master on finishing a year of Gen Chem. A few examples of what students attain in this course:
• Knowledge, understanding, command of introductory concepts & pinnacles of chemistry (reactions, stoichiometry, thermodynamics, atomic theory, etc.)
• Skills: problem-solving, writing science reports, math, working/interacting in groups…
• Acquire and develop common lab techniques, practices, and safety requirements
• Relating chemical concepts to the real world
• Applying & innovating learned material to new or unseen situations
• Ability to utilize and transfer learned ideas and techniques to upper division science courses
Chem-009 is composed of two parts: lab and recitation. Students will be in the lab performing an experiment on a weekly basis. The first lab period focuses on check-in and safety, which is first and foremost the most important. Recitation is a time where students can ask questions pertaining to the lecture portion of General Chemistry and about previous and upcoming lab experiments. Recitation meets twice a week, with one preceding the lab.
Concurrent: 001. Fall.
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General Chemistry Lab II CHEM-010-20

Credits: 2
2nd Summer Session
Laboratory
Day and Time
  • Mon 12:10 PM - 2:45 PM
  • Tue 12:10 PM - 2:45 PM
  • Wed 12:10 PM - 2:45 PM
  • Thu 12:10 PM - 2:45 PM
 
Recitation
  • Mon 10:15 AM - 11:25 AM
  • Tue 10:15 AM - 11:25 AM
  • Wed 10:15 AM - 11:25 AM
  • Thu 10:15 AM - 11:25 AM

This course must be taken with CHEM-002.

: Prior lab experience helped students in gaining familiarity with the ...

: Prior lab experience helped students in gaining familiarity with the tools and instruments utilized in the lab. In this current lab course, students hone and refine their skills and techniques. Much like the first semester in Gen Chem, working safely in the laboratory is paramount. Gen Chem lab II delves into important topics such as equilibria. The first semester introduced students to different types of chemical reactions. In the second semester, students gain a better understanding as to the determinants of reaction type. More importantly, students will gain insights into the extent (equilibria) with which reactants progress to products. The remainder of the laboratory experiments provides students with background in solid structures, electrochemistry, coordination chemistry, etc. A few examples of what students attain in this course:
• Knowledge, understanding, command of introductory concepts & pinnacles of chemistry (reactions, stoichiometry, thermodynamics, kinetics, equilibria, solid structures, electrochemistry, coordination chemistry, etc.)
• Skills: problem-solving, writing science reports, math, working/interacting in groups…
• Hone and refine common lab techniques, practices, and safety requirements
• Relating chemical concepts to the real world
• Applying & innovating learned material to new or unseen situations
• Ability to utilize and transfer learned ideas and techniques to upper division science courses
Chem-010 is composed of two parts: lab and recitation. Students will be in the lab performing an experiment on a weekly basis. Recitation is a time where students can ask questions pertaining to the lecture portion of General Chemistry and about previous and upcoming lab experiments. Recitation meets twice a week, with one preceding the lab.
Concurrent: -002. Spring.
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General Chemistry Lab II CHEM-010-22

Credits: 2
2nd Summer Session
Laboratory
Day and Time
  • Mon 12:10 PM - 2:45 PM
  • Tue 12:10 PM - 2:45 PM
  • Wed 12:10 PM - 2:45 PM
  • Thu 12:10 PM - 2:45 PM
 
Recitation
  • Mon 10:15 AM - 11:25 AM
  • Tue 10:15 AM - 11:25 AM
  • Wed 10:15 AM - 11:25 AM
  • Thu 10:15 AM - 11:25 AM

This course must be taken with CHEM-002.

: Prior lab experience helped students in gaining familiarity with the ...

: Prior lab experience helped students in gaining familiarity with the tools and instruments utilized in the lab. In this current lab course, students hone and refine their skills and techniques. Much like the first semester in Gen Chem, working safely in the laboratory is paramount. Gen Chem lab II delves into important topics such as equilibria. The first semester introduced students to different types of chemical reactions. In the second semester, students gain a better understanding as to the determinants of reaction type. More importantly, students will gain insights into the extent (equilibria) with which reactants progress to products. The remainder of the laboratory experiments provides students with background in solid structures, electrochemistry, coordination chemistry, etc. A few examples of what students attain in this course:
• Knowledge, understanding, command of introductory concepts & pinnacles of chemistry (reactions, stoichiometry, thermodynamics, kinetics, equilibria, solid structures, electrochemistry, coordination chemistry, etc.)
• Skills: problem-solving, writing science reports, math, working/interacting in groups…
• Hone and refine common lab techniques, practices, and safety requirements
• Relating chemical concepts to the real world
• Applying & innovating learned material to new or unseen situations
• Ability to utilize and transfer learned ideas and techniques to upper division science courses
Chem-010 is composed of two parts: lab and recitation. Students will be in the lab performing an experiment on a weekly basis. Recitation is a time where students can ask questions pertaining to the lecture portion of General Chemistry and about previous and upcoming lab experiments. Recitation meets twice a week, with one preceding the lab.
Concurrent: -002. Spring.
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Intro to Forensic Chemistry CHEM-025-20

Credits: 3
2nd Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Tue 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Wed 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Thu 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM

This course is designed for the non-science major students to ...

This course is designed for the non-science major students to stimulate their interest in the forensic chemistry and help them appreciate and understand the basic fundamental concepts of chemistry. In each chapter, chemical concepts related to a forensic topic are introduced in addition to a brief description of an analytical instrumentation or methodology used in crime investigation lab and a case study. The main purpose of this course is to deliver the chemistry concepts to students without going into great details.
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Organic Chemistry I CHEM-115-10

Credits: 3
1st Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 12:00 PM - 2:00 PM
  • Tue 12:00 PM - 2:00 PM
  • Wed 12:00 PM - 2:00 PM
  • Thu 12:00 PM - 2:00 PM
  • Fri 12:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Principles and theories of organic chemistry, including structural changes as ...

Principles and theories of organic chemistry, including structural changes as studied by spectroscopy (IR, NMR, and mass spectra). Preparations, reactions, mechanisms, stereochemistry, and properties of alkanes, alkenes, alkyl halides, alcohols, ethers, aldehydes, ketones, and organometallic compounds are studied in detail. Prerequisites: -002, -010. Three lectures plus evening sessions for exams. Fall.
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Organic Chemistry II CHEM-116-20

Credits: 3
2nd Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 12:00 PM - 2:00 PM
  • Tue 12:00 PM - 2:00 PM
  • Wed 12:00 PM - 2:00 PM
  • Thu 12:00 PM - 2:00 PM
  • Fri 12:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Continues and presupposes -115. Compounds studied include aromatic compounds, amines ...

Continues and presupposes -115. Compounds studied include aromatic compounds, amines, carbonyl-containing compounds, conjugated and difunctional compounds, heterocyclics, and the biologically important amino acids, peptides, and carbohydrates. Prerequisite: -115. Three lectures plus evening sessions for exams. Spring.
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Organic Chemistry I Lab CHEM-117-10

Credits: 2
1st Summer Session
Laboratory
Day and Time
  • Wed 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Thu 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Fri 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
 
Recitation
  • Tue 8:30 AM - 10:15 AM

Introduction to experimental organic chemistry. Fundamental techniques of organic synthesis ...

Introduction to experimental organic chemistry. Fundamental techniques of organic synthesis, including separation, purification, and characterization of organic compounds. Introduction to spectroscopic and chromatographic methods. Prerequisites: 002, 010. Concurrent: 115. One four-hour laboratory and one one-hour recitation. Fall.
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Organic Chemistry I Lab CHEM-117-11

Credits: 2
1st Summer Session
Laboratory
Day and Time
  • Wed 3:00 PM - 6:15 PM
  • Thu 3:00 PM - 6:15 PM
  • Fri 3:00 PM - 6:15 PM
 
Recitation
  • Tue 2:45 PM - 4:30 PM

Introduction to experimental organic chemistry. Fundamental techniques of organic synthesis ...

Introduction to experimental organic chemistry. Fundamental techniques of organic synthesis, including separation, purification, and characterization of organic compounds. Introduction to spectroscopic and chromatographic methods. Prerequisites: 002, 010. Concurrent: 115. One four-hour laboratory and one one-hour recitation. Fall.
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Organic Chemistry I Lab CHEM-117-12

Credits: 2
1st Summer Session
Laboratory
Day and Time
  • Wed 3:00 PM - 6:15 PM
  • Thu 3:00 PM - 6:15 PM
  • Fri 3:00 PM - 6:15 PM
 
Recitation
  • Tue 2:45 PM - 4:30 PM

Introduction to experimental organic chemistry. Fundamental techniques of organic synthesis ...

Introduction to experimental organic chemistry. Fundamental techniques of organic synthesis, including separation, purification, and characterization of organic compounds. Introduction to spectroscopic and chromatographic methods. Prerequisites: 002, 010. Concurrent: 115. One four-hour laboratory and one one-hour recitation. Fall.
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Organic Chemistry I Lab CHEM-117-13

Credits: 2
1st Summer Session
Laboratory
Day and Time
  • Wed 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Thu 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Fri 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
 
Recitation
  • Tue 8:30 AM - 10:15 AM

Introduction to experimental organic chemistry. Fundamental techniques of organic synthesis ...

Introduction to experimental organic chemistry. Fundamental techniques of organic synthesis, including separation, purification, and characterization of organic compounds. Introduction to spectroscopic and chromatographic methods. Prerequisites: 002, 010. Concurrent: 115. One four-hour laboratory and one one-hour recitation. Fall.
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Organic Chemistry II Lab CHEM-118-20

Credits: 2
2nd Summer Session
Laboratory
Day and Time
  • Wed 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Thu 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Fri 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
 
Recitation
  • Tue 8:30 AM - 10:15 AM

Continues and presupposes -117. More complex synthetic reactions, including cycloadditions ...

Continues and presupposes -117. More complex synthetic reactions, including cycloadditions, carbonyl additions and condensations, isolation of natural products; qualitative organic analysis. Prerequisites: 115 and -117. Concurrent: -116. One four-hour laboratory and one one-hour recitation. Spring.
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Organic Chemistry II Lab CHEM-118-21

Credits: 2
2nd Summer Session
Laboratory
Day and Time
  • Wed 3:00 PM - 6:15 PM
  • Thu 3:00 PM - 6:15 PM
  • Fri 3:00 PM - 6:15 PM
 
Recitation
  • Tue 2:45 PM - 4:30 PM

Continues and presupposes -117. More complex synthetic reactions, including cycloadditions ...

Continues and presupposes -117. More complex synthetic reactions, including cycloadditions, carbonyl additions and condensations, isolation of natural products; qualitative organic analysis. Prerequisites: 115 and -117. Concurrent: -116. One four-hour laboratory and one one-hour recitation. Spring.
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Organic Chemistry II Lab CHEM-118-22

Credits: 2
2nd Summer Session
Laboratory
Day and Time
  • Wed 3:00 PM - 6:15 PM
  • Thu 3:00 PM - 6:15 PM
  • Fri 3:00 PM - 6:15 PM
 
Recitation
  • Tue 2:45 PM - 4:30 PM

Continues and presupposes -117. More complex synthetic reactions, including cycloadditions ...

Continues and presupposes -117. More complex synthetic reactions, including cycloadditions, carbonyl additions and condensations, isolation of natural products; qualitative organic analysis. Prerequisites: 115 and -117. Concurrent: -116. One four-hour laboratory and one one-hour recitation. Spring.
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Organic Chemistry II Lab CHEM-118-23

Credits: 2
2nd Summer Session
Laboratory
Day and Time
  • Wed 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Thu 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Fri 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
 
Recitation
  • Tue 8:30 AM - 10:15 AM

Continues and presupposes -117. More complex synthetic reactions, including cycloadditions ...

Continues and presupposes -117. More complex synthetic reactions, including cycloadditions, carbonyl additions and condensations, isolation of natural products; qualitative organic analysis. Prerequisites: 115 and -117. Concurrent: -116. One four-hour laboratory and one one-hour recitation. Spring.
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Intermediate Ancient Greek CLSG-101-01

Credits: 3
Presession
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 2:45 PM - 4:00 PM
  • Tue 2:45 PM - 4:00 PM
  • Wed 2:45 PM - 4:00 PM
  • Thu 2:45 PM - 4:00 PM
  • Fri 2:45 PM - 4:00 PM
 
Lecture
  • Mon 9:00 AM - 10:30 AM
  • Tue 9:00 AM - 10:30 AM
  • Wed 9:00 AM - 10:30 AM
  • Thu 9:00 AM - 10:30 AM
  • Fri 9:00 AM - 10:30 AM

Students read Plato’s Apology, which represents Socrates’ speech at ...

Students read Plato’s Apology, which represents Socrates’ speech at his trial for impiety, and Euripides’ Medea. The Apology introduces the concentrated prose of philosophic argument in the novel setting of a forensic speech. Students also study the historical context of the trial itself: the defeat of Athens, the reign and fall of the Thirty, and the restoration of democracy. With the Medea, students turn to the poetry of Attic tragedy, and become become familiar with the structures of ancient tragedy as well as the dramatic festivals of Athens as the setting for tragic productions. By the end of this course students will:
• Read Plato’s Apology and Euripides’ Medea;
• Demonstrate control of Greek morphology and syntax;
• Acquire vocabulary necessary to read central Attic poetic and prose texts;
• Develop proficiency in translating at sight Greek poetry and prose;
• Learn about Greek prosody and understand Greek verse structures, including the iambic trimeter;
• Acquire an awareness of the differences between the Attic and Doric dialects, as featured in tragedy.
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Intermediate Latin CLSL-101-01

Credits: 3
Presession
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 2:45 PM - 4:00 PM
  • Tue 2:45 PM - 4:00 PM
  • Wed 2:45 PM - 4:00 PM
  • Thu 2:45 PM - 4:00 PM
  • Fri 2:45 PM - 4:00 PM
 
Lecture
  • Mon 9:00 AM - 10:30 AM
  • Tue 9:00 AM - 10:30 AM
  • Wed 9:00 AM - 10:30 AM
  • Thu 9:00 AM - 10:30 AM
  • Fri 9:00 AM - 10:30 AM

This class, for students with one year of college Latin ...

This class, for students with one year of college Latin or the equivalent, combines grammar review with an introduction to the reading and translation of Latin prose and verse literature. The texts to be studied are: (1) Cicero’s first and third orations against the alleged conspirator Catiline, delivered respectively to the Senate and the People of Rome in 63 BC; and (2) book 2 of Vergil’s epic of Rome’s foundation, the Aeneid. A special emphasis is placed in the second half of the course on the idiosyncrasies of poetic language and mastering Vergil’s meter, the dactylic hexameter. After successful completion of this class, students are ready for advanced courses in Latin literature.
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Intro to Informatn Technology COSC-010-10

Credits: 3
1st Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Tue 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Wed 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Thu 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM

This course is for non-majors seeking an introduction to the ...

This course is for non-majors seeking an introduction to the principles and practices of information technology and computer science. These concepts are introduced in the context of current and future computing technologies such as computer graphics, Web programming, and artificial intelligence. As well, the course introduces some of the economic, legal, ethical, and social issues related to the capabilities and limitations of network and computing technology. The course first presents the basics of computing machinery: information and its representations, elements of computer organization, and low-level machine hardware. Next, the course covers the basics of computing software: algorithms and computer programming in machine, assembly, and high-level programming languages. Using the theories of computability and complexity, a discussion of the general capabilities and limitations of computing and networks follows. Finally, a survey of some computer and network applications provides a setting in which to apply the basic analytic concepts and technological tools previously introduced. Classes meet once per week for lectures and once per week for lab sessions. Course work includes weekly written and programming assignments, and midterm and final exams. This course may be used to fulfill the math/computer science portion of the Gen Ed Math/Science requirement. The course does not train students to use application programs such as word processors and Internet browsers.
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Intro to Informatn Technology COSC-010-20

Credits: 3
2nd Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Tue 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Wed 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Thu 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM

This course is for non-majors seeking an introduction to the ...

This course is for non-majors seeking an introduction to the principles and practices of information technology and computer science. These concepts are introduced in the context of current and future computing technologies such as computer graphics, Web programming, and artificial intelligence. As well, the course introduces some of the economic, legal, ethical, and social issues related to the capabilities and limitations of network and computing technology. The course first presents the basics of computing machinery: information and its representations, elements of computer organization, and low-level machine hardware. Next, the course covers the basics of computing software: algorithms and computer programming in machine, assembly, and high-level programming languages. Using the theories of computability and complexity, a discussion of the general capabilities and limitations of computing and networks follows. Finally, a survey of some computer and network applications provides a setting in which to apply the basic analytic concepts and technological tools previously introduced. Classes meet once per week for lectures and once per week for lab sessions. Course work includes weekly written and programming assignments, and midterm and final exams. This course may be used to fulfill the math/computer science portion of the Gen Ed Math/Science requirement. The course does not train students to use application programs such as word processors and Internet browsers.
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Intro to Comp Sci Using Ruby COSC-015-10

Credits: 3
1st Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Tue 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Wed 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Thu 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM

Basic knowledge of Computer Science, using a non-mathematical approach geared ...

Basic knowledge of Computer Science, using a non-mathematical approach geared towards students of Humanities and Social Sciences, will be developed. Students will acquire an understanding of the methods used to arrive at solutions of text related problems, games and other non mathematical processes, using a subset of a novel programming language. The language selected, Ruby, represents the most modern breed of languages, and is gaining rapid recognition and heavy usage throughout the world. No use of mathematics above the high school level is required, although the capability to analyze problems and synthesize solutions will be assumed.
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Math Methods for Comp Sci COSC-030-10

Credits: 3
1st Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Tue 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Wed 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Thu 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM

This course, designed to be taken concurrently with COSC-052, covers ...

This course, designed to be taken concurrently with COSC-052, covers mathematical tools and principles that are valuable to the computer scientist. Topics include: propositional and predicate logic; mathematical proofs, including induction; counting and basic probability theory; logarithmic and exponential functions; elementary graph theory; and "Big-O" notation and asymptotics.
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Computer Science I COSC-051-10

Credits: 3
1st Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Tue 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Wed 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Thu 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM

This course is intended for computer science majors and minors ...

This course is intended for computer science majors and minors, and other students with a serious interest in learning C++ programming. The course covers the following topics: basic data types, the C++ string class, variables and constants, and their declaration, input/output (cin/cout) operators, assignment operators, arithmetic operators, conditional control structures, repetition control structures, basic file operations, user-defined functions, value and reference parameters, scope rules, name precedence, function overloading, template functions, elementary software engineering principles, Standard Template Library (STL), the vector class, elementary searching and sorting, user-defined classes, operator overloading, pointers, self-referential classes, dynamic object creation and destruction, linked lists, and recursion. This course may be used to fulfill the math/computer science portion of the Gen Ed Math/Science requirement. COSC 051 followed by COSC 052 is a major introductory sequence and together complete the General Education requirement for math/science.
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Computer Science I COSC-051-20

Credits: 3
2nd Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Tue 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Wed 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Thu 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM

This course is intended for computer science majors and minors ...

This course is intended for computer science majors and minors, and other students with a serious interest in learning C++ programming. The course covers the following topics: basic data types, the C++ string class, variables and constants, and their declaration, input/output (cin/cout) operators, assignment operators, arithmetic operators, conditional control structures, repetition control structures, basic file operations, user-defined functions, value and reference parameters, scope rules, name precedence, function overloading, template functions, elementary software engineering principles, Standard Template Library (STL), the vector class, elementary searching and sorting, user-defined classes, operator overloading, pointers, self-referential classes, dynamic object creation and destruction, linked lists, and recursion. This course may be used to fulfill the math/computer science portion of the Gen Ed Math/Science requirement. COSC 051 followed by COSC 052 is a major introductory sequence and together complete the General Education requirement for math/science.
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Computer Science II COSC-052-20

Credits: 3
2nd Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Tue 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Wed 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Thu 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM

This course surveys advanced topics of C++ programming and introductory ...

This course surveys advanced topics of C++ programming and introductory concepts of data structures. It is intended for computer science majors, minors, and other students with a serious interest in learning C++ programming. The course covers the following topics: program organization, pointers, self-referential classes, dynamic object creation and destruction, linked lists, recursion, inheritance, abstract base classes, virtual functions, polymorphism, template classes, exception handling, C-style arrays, bit operations, random file access, big-Oh notation, abstract data types, stacks, queues, deques, lists, vectors, sequences, priority queues, binary trees, binary search trees, elementary graphs, searching, and sorting. This course may be used to fulfill the math/computer science portion of the Gen Ed Math/Science requirement. COSC 051 followed by COSC 052 is a major introductory sequence and together complete the General Education requirement for math/science.
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Econ Principles Micro ECON-001-10

Credits: 3
1st Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Tue 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Wed 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Thu 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM

This course first develops simple graphical and mathematical models of ...

This course first develops simple graphical and mathematical models of decision-making by individual economic agents: consumers, workers, and businesses. We analyze interactions between these agents in product and factor markets using concepts of market demand, supply, and equilibrium. Finally, we demonstrate the efficiency of perfectly competitive markets, describe the conditions under which that efficiency arises, and examine market failures that occur when those conditions are not met.
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Econ Principles Micro ECON-001-20

Credits: 3
2nd Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Tue 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Wed 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Thu 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM

This course first develops simple graphical and mathematical models of ...

This course first develops simple graphical and mathematical models of decision-making by individual economic agents: consumers, workers, and businesses. We analyze interactions between these agents in product and factor markets using concepts of market demand, supply, and equilibrium. Finally, we demonstrate the efficiency of perfectly competitive markets, describe the conditions under which that efficiency arises, and examine market failures that occur when those conditions are not met.
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Econ Principles Macro ECON-002-10

Credits: 3
1st Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Tue 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Wed 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Thu 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM

This course provides an introduction to macroeconomics. The first part ...

This course provides an introduction to macroeconomics. The first part of the course explores how GDP, inflation, unemployment, and other macroeconomic aggregates are measured in practice. The second part develops analytical models of macroeconomic performance and growth in the long run. The third part focuses on short-run (business-cycle) fluctuations and fiscal and monetary policies.
Fall and Spring.
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Econ Principles Macro ECON-002-20

Credits: 3
2nd Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Tue 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Wed 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Thu 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM

This course provides an introduction to macroeconomics. The first part ...

This course provides an introduction to macroeconomics. The first part of the course explores how GDP, inflation, unemployment, and other macroeconomic aggregates are measured in practice. The second part develops analytical models of macroeconomic performance and growth in the long run. The third part focuses on short-run (business-cycle) fluctuations and fiscal and monetary policies.
Fall and Spring.
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Intermediate Micro ECON-101-20

Credits: 3
2nd Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Tue 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Wed 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Thu 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM

This course covers the basic elements of microeconomic theory including ...

This course covers the basic elements of microeconomic theory including consumer choice, the impact on resource allocation of different market structures ranging from competition to monopoly, game theory, general equilibrium analysis, and asymmetric information. We will focus on equilibrium and optimization throughout.
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Intermediate Macro ECON-102-10

Credits: 3
1st Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Tue 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Wed 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Thu 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM

This course covers the measurement of output and prices, theory ...

This course covers the measurement of output and prices, theory of economic growth, business cycle theory, fiscal policy, monetary policy. Fall and Spring.
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Economic Statistics ECON-121-10

Credits: 4
1st Summer Session
Laboratory
Day and Time
  • Wed 4:15 PM - 5:30 PM
 
Lecture
  • Mon 8:30 AM - 10:30 AM
  • Tue 8:30 AM - 10:30 AM
  • Wed 8:30 AM - 10:30 AM
  • Thu 8:30 AM - 10:30 AM

After overviewing descriptive statistics, and the theory of probability and ...

After overviewing descriptive statistics, and the theory of probability and random variables, this course covers statistical inference in detail. Students receive the firm foundation needed for Introduction to Econometrics. Regression analysis, the primary tool for empirical work in economics, is introduced. Electronic data acquisition and computer applications receive hands-on treatment.
Lab sessions meet weekly to discuss homework and the use of computer software. Fall and Spring.
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Intro to Econometrics ECON-122-20

Credits: 4
2nd Summer Session
Laboratory
Day and Time
  • Wed 7:00 PM - 8:15 PM
 
Lecture
  • Mon 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Tue 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Wed 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Thu 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM

This course develops the theory and applications of regression analysis ...

This course develops the theory and applications of regression analysis, which is the primary tool for empirical work in economics. Emphasis is placed on techniques for estimating economic relationships and testing economic hypotheses. Fall and Spring.
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International Trade ECON-243-10

Credits: 3
1st Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Tue 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Wed 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Thu 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM

This course covers the theory and practice of international trade ...

This course covers the theory and practice of international trade. The first part of the course develops the classical and modern theories of the determination of the pattern of commodity trade between nations. The second part of the course covers trade policy and the role of institutions in managing world trade. Fall and Spring.
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International Trade ECON-243-20

Credits: 3
2nd Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Tue 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Wed 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Thu 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM

This course covers the theory and practice of international trade ...

This course covers the theory and practice of international trade. The first part of the course develops the classical and modern theories of the determination of the pattern of commodity trade between nations. The second part of the course covers trade policy and the role of institutions in managing world trade. Fall and Spring.
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International Finance ECON-244-10

Credits: 3
1st Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Tue 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Wed 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Thu 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM

This course deals with the theory and practice of international ...

This course deals with the theory and practice of international macroeconomics and finance. Concepts of balance of payments and exchange rates are developed, followed by macroeconomic tools in an open economy. Balance of payments adjustments will be analyzed under fixed and flexible exchange rate systems. Macroeconomic topics -- such as inflation, growth, unemployment, the roles of monetary and fiscal policies -- will be discussed using examples from developed and/or developing countries.
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International Finance ECON-244-20

Credits: 3
2nd Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Tue 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Wed 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Thu 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM

This course deals with the theory and practice of international ...

This course deals with the theory and practice of international macroeconomics and finance. Concepts of balance of payments and exchange rates are developed, followed by macroeconomic tools in an open economy. Balance of payments adjustments will be analyzed under fixed and flexible exchange rate systems. Macroeconomic topics -- such as inflation, growth, unemployment, the roles of monetary and fiscal policies -- will be discussed using examples from developed and/or developing countries.
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Expository Writing ENGL-001-20

Credits: 3
2nd Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 10:45 AM - 12:15 PM
  • Tue 10:45 AM - 12:15 PM
  • Wed 10:45 AM - 12:15 PM
  • Thu 10:45 AM - 12:15 PM
  • Fri 10:45 AM - 12:15 PM

This course is open to summer high school students only. Not open to BALS students.

None
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Shakespeare ENGL-124-01

Credits: 3
Presession
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Tue 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Wed 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Thu 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Fri 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM

Cannot take if successfuly completed ENGL 130.

The course will look closely at five of Shakespeare’s ...

The course will look closely at five of Shakespeare’s best known plays. (As You Like It, King Henry IV, Part I, The Merchant of Venice, Macbeth and King Lear will probably be the five plays). It will focus largely (but not exclusively) on two significant questions: how might these plays have been brought to life by actors on a stage in Shakespeare’s time and how might they continue to be brought to life by actors in our own time. Through the process of seeking answers to those questions the course will hope also to discover what the plays of Shakespeare, on the page and on the stage, might say to us now, some five hundred years after they were written.

Students will be asked to take part in a number of acting exercises throughout the semester to enhance their understanding of how a script is brought to life on the stage. (The course carries four credits in order to provide them an opportunity to do so). They will also be asked to attend a production of King Henry IV, Part I at the Shakespeare Theatre in Washington. A lab fee for the course will cover the cost of the ticket.
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Science Fiction and Fantasy ENGL-213-20

Credits: 3
2nd Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Tue 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Wed 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Thu 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM

This course will investigate the concept of the future within ...

This course will investigate the concept of the future within a global cultural imagination, examining a wide range of literary and cinematic genres in science fiction & fantasy. The class will read a short selection from earlier science fiction writers—from H.G. Wells and Isaac Asimov to Arthur C. Clarke and Philip K. Dick—and discuss how speculations of the future have evolved over time. We will address how such classic works speak to contemporary issues about the science of geophysical disasters, the destruction of the environment, financial Armageddon, pandemics and contagions, governmental control and the chilling prospects of nuclear war and global terrorism. Other topics will encompass Afrofuturism, utopia and dystopia, myths and legends, vampires, epic quests in historical and fantasy novels and Japanese anime. Other writers may include Octavia Butler, Ted Chiang, Paul Erdman, Anne Rice and J. R. R. Tolkien.
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Science Fiction and Fantasy ENGL-213-25

Credits: 3
2nd Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Tue 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Wed 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Thu 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM

This course section is for graduate students only.

This course will investigate the concept of the future within ...

This course will investigate the concept of the future within a global cultural imagination, examining a wide range of literary and cinematic genres in science fiction & fantasy. The class will read a short selection from earlier science fiction writers—from H.G. Wells and Isaac Asimov to Arthur C. Clarke and Philip K. Dick—and discuss how speculations of the future have evolved over time. We will address how such classic works speak to contemporary issues about the science of geophysical disasters, the destruction of the environment, financial Armageddon, pandemics and contagions, governmental control and the chilling prospects of nuclear war and global terrorism. Other topics will encompass Afrofuturism, utopia and dystopia, myths and legends, vampires, epic quests in historical and fantasy novels and Japanese anime. Other writers may include Octavia Butler, Ted Chiang, Paul Erdman, Anne Rice and J. R. R. Tolkien.
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Young Adult Lit. ENGL-238-10

Credits: 3
1st Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Tue 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Wed 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Thu 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM

Young Adult Lit. ENGL-238-15

Credits: 3
1st Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Tue 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Wed 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Thu 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM

This course section is for graduate students only.

None
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War/Terrorism in Pop Culture ENGL-246-20

Credits: 3
2nd Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Tue 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Wed 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Thu 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM

Cannot take if successfully completed ENGL 291 with Professor Gorman.

None
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War/Terrorism in Pop Culture ENGL-246-25

Credits: 3
2nd Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Tue 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Wed 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Thu 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM

This course section is for graduate students only.

None
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Post-WWII US Cinema ENGL-252-20

Credits: 3
2nd Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Tue 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Wed 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Thu 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM

This course will examine media production in the United States ...

This course will examine media production in the United States after WWII until approximately 1965--a period in which the terms "The Cold War," "Containment Culture," "The Red Scare," "The Atomic Age," and "The Children's Decade" have been retroactively applied. Students can expect to examine a variety of cinematic texts from a mix of critical lenses, including class, race, gender, sexuality, and disability.
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Post-WWII US Cinema ENGL-252-25

Credits: 3
2nd Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Tue 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Wed 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Thu 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM

This course section is for graduate students only.

This course will examine media production in the United States ...

This course will examine media production in the United States after WWII until approximately 1965--a period in which the terms "The Cold War," "Containment Culture," "The Red Scare," "The Atomic Age," and "The Children's Decade" have been retroactively applied. Students can expect to examine a variety of cinematic texts from a mix of critical lenses, including class, race, gender, sexuality, and disability.
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Satire ENGL-278-10

Credits: 3
1st Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Tue 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Wed 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Thu 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM

What does satire do? While contemporary pundits make "straightforward" arguments ...

What does satire do? While contemporary pundits make "straightforward" arguments with varying degrees of success, outlets like The Onion and The Colbert Report take a satirical approach not only to entertaining audiences, but to conveying principles they deem important. This course explores the art and function of the satirical tradition that predates (and includes) these contemporary satirists. We will cover satire, in prose and in poetry, from its roots in antiquity (Horace, Juvenal) to contemporary novels, punditry, and television, with significant coverage of the formative years of satire in English, the 17th and 18th centuries. Dryden, Pope, and Swift will figure prominently in this course, as will the under-acknowledged satirical writings of women like Aphra Behn, Mary Chudleigh, and Mary Wortly Montagu.
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Satire ENGL-278-15

Credits: 3
1st Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Tue 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Wed 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Thu 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM

This course section is for graduate students only.

What does satire do? While contemporary pundits make "straightforward" arguments ...

What does satire do? While contemporary pundits make "straightforward" arguments with varying degrees of success, outlets like The Onion and The Colbert Report take a satirical approach not only to entertaining audiences, but to conveying principles they deem important. This course explores the art and function of the satirical tradition that predates (and includes) these contemporary satirists. We will cover satire, in prose and in poetry, from its roots in antiquity (Horace, Juvenal) to contemporary novels, punditry, and television, with significant coverage of the formative years of satire in English, the 17th and 18th centuries. Dryden, Pope, and Swift will figure prominently in this course, as will the under-acknowledged satirical writings of women like Aphra Behn, Mary Chudleigh, and Mary Wortly Montagu.
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Fundamentals of Finance FINC-150-10

Credits: 3
1st Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Tue 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Wed 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Thu 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM

This course is a survey course, designed to explore the ...

This course is a survey course, designed to explore the major concepts in corporate finance. Topics include Time Value of Money; Net Present Value/Internal Rate of Return; Valuation of Stocks and Bonds; Financial Statements/Ratios; Managing Growth; Discounted Cash Flow; Risk, Return and the Cost of Capital; Capital Structure; Dividends; Raising Capital/Going Public; Mergers and Acquisitions; and Corporate Restructuring.

The course focuses on applications of finance to assist students outside the Business School to understand financial statements, apply financial analytical techniques, and learn the basics of the capital markets. Note: students will not be expected to have prior knowledge of course concepts.
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Fundamentals of Finance FINC-150-20

Credits: 3
2nd Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Tue 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Wed 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Thu 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM

This course is a survey course, designed to explore the ...

This course is a survey course, designed to explore the major concepts in corporate finance. Topics include Time Value of Money; Net Present Value/Internal Rate of Return; Valuation of Stocks and Bonds; Financial Statements/Ratios; Managing Growth; Discounted Cash Flow; Risk, Return and the Cost of Capital; Capital Structure; Dividends; Raising Capital/Going Public; Mergers and Acquisitions; and Corporate Restructuring.

The course focuses on applications of finance to assist students outside the Business School to understand financial statements, apply financial analytical techniques, and learn the basics of the capital markets. Note: students will not be expected to have prior knowledge of course concepts.
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Fundamentals of Finance FINC-150-30

Credits: 3
Cross Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Tue 6:00 PM - 8:30 PM
  • Thu 6:00 PM - 8:30 PM

This course will abe held at the downtown campus, located at 640 Massachusetts Avenue.

This course is a survey course, designed to explore the ...

This course is a survey course, designed to explore the major concepts in corporate finance. Topics include Time Value of Money; Net Present Value/Internal Rate of Return; Valuation of Stocks and Bonds; Financial Statements/Ratios; Managing Growth; Discounted Cash Flow; Risk, Return and the Cost of Capital; Capital Structure; Dividends; Raising Capital/Going Public; Mergers and Acquisitions; and Corporate Restructuring.

The course focuses on applications of finance to assist students outside the Business School to understand financial statements, apply financial analytical techniques, and learn the basics of the capital markets. Note: students will not be expected to have prior knowledge of course concepts.
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Business Financial Management FINC-211-10

Credits: 3
1st Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Tue 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Wed 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Thu 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM

This basic course in finance covers the functions of financial ...

This basic course in finance covers the functions of financial managers, financial markets, and financial analysis tools, and corporate financial decision making. It provides an introduction to cost of capital, investment analysis, capital budgeting and the valuation of securities.
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Adv Financial Management FINC-212-20

Credits: 3
2nd Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Tue 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Wed 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Thu 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM

Visiting students must obtain permission of instructor to register or succcessfully complete FINC-211-10 prior to registering.

This course provides an extensive coverage of corporate finance theory ...

This course provides an extensive coverage of corporate finance theory and the applicability of this theory for the financial manager. Topics include: capital budgeting under uncertainty; the relevance of capital structure decisions on security valuation and riskiness; the theory and practice of dividend policy; implications of financial market efficiency for management; risks and rewards of international financial markets; security valuation including the use of option pricing models; the market for corporate control; risk management through the use of options and future contracts; financial engineering; corporate restructuring and bankruptcy. Cases are used. Prerequisite: Business Financial Management.
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Development of Motion Picture FMST-210-20

Credits: 3
2nd Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 3:15 PM - 5:45 PM
  • Tue 3:15 PM - 5:45 PM
  • Wed 3:15 PM - 5:45 PM
  • Thu 3:15 PM - 5:45 PM

Introductory French I FREN-001-10

Credits: 3
1st Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
  • Tue 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
  • Wed 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
  • Thu 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
  • Fri 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM

This sequence is intended for students with little or no ...

This sequence is intended for students with little or no previous background in French. Through an audiovisual introduction to French culture, emphasis is placed on the active use of the spoken language with diversified oral and written exercises, dictation, and conversational practice. Required laboratory.
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Introductory French II FREN-002-20

Credits: 3
2nd Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
  • Tue 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
  • Wed 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
  • Thu 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
  • Fri 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM

This sequence is intended for students with little or no ...

This sequence is intended for students with little or no previous background in French. Through an audiovisual introduction to French culture, emphasis is placed on the active use of the spoken language with diversified oral and written exercises, dictation, and conversational practice. Required laboratory.
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Intermediate French I FREN-021-10

Credits: 3
1st Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 10:45 AM - 12:15 PM
  • Tue 10:45 AM - 12:15 PM
  • Wed 10:45 AM - 12:15 PM
  • Thu 10:45 AM - 12:15 PM
  • Fri 10:45 AM - 12:15 PM

Intermediate French I (FREN 021) is the continuation of Introductory ...

Intermediate French I (FREN 021) is the continuation of Introductory French II (FREN 002). Students who enroll in this course have typically taken Introductory French II (FREN 002) or have been placed in this course by means of the French Department Placement Test. This course is based on the Intermediate French method “Ensemble” (John Wiley & Sons, Inc.), which consists of a grammar text (with an optional workbook) and a reader. Additional audio-visual material will be provided by the instructor. This course will help you develop and strengthen all four language skills (speaking, listening, reading, and writing) and expand on your every-day vocabulary.

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Intermediate French II FREN-022-20

Credits: 3
2nd Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 3:15 PM - 4:45 PM
  • Tue 3:15 PM - 4:45 PM
  • Wed 3:15 PM - 4:45 PM
  • Thu 3:15 PM - 4:45 PM
  • Fri 3:15 PM - 4:45 PM

Intermediate French II (FREN 022) is the continuation of Intermediate ...

Intermediate French II (FREN 022) is the continuation of Intermediate French I (FREN 021). Students who enroll in this course have typically taken Intermediate French I (FREN 021) or have been placed in this course by means of the French Department Placement Test. This course is based on the Intermediate French method “Ensemble” (John Wiley & Sons, Inc.), which consists of a grammar text (with an optional workbook) and a reader. Additional audio-visual material will be provided by the instructor. This course will help you develop and strengthen all four language skills (speaking, listening, reading, and writing) and expand on your every-day vocabulary.
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Intro Germ I: Exper Germany GERM-001-10

Credits: 3
1st Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Tue 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Wed 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Thu 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM

Part I of Level I. The two-course sequence of Level ...

Part I of Level I. The two-course sequence of Level I introduces students to various aspects of the German-speaking world as a way of enabling them to begin building communicative abilities in German in all four language modalities: reading, listening, writing, and speaking. Instruction proceeds from guided to more creative and independent work. The courses incorporate a variety of activities that are based on a range of topics, text types, and different socio-cultural situations. Through diverse collaborative and individual tasks, students begin to find personal forms of expression that are based on these materials. Students learn basic strategies for reading, listening, and writing, and for participating in every-day conversations. In the process they become familiar with and learn to use with some confidence the major sentence patterns and grammatical features of German as well as high-frequency vocabulary of everyday life. Integration of current technology (e.g., the Internet, e-mail, video) familiarizes students with the German-speaking world while at the same time enhancing language learning.
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Intro German II:Exper Germany GERM-002-20

Credits: 3
2nd Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Tue 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Wed 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Thu 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM

Part 2 of Level I. The two-course sequence of Level ...

Part 2 of Level I. The two-course sequence of Level I introduces students to various aspects of the German-speaking world as a way of enabling them to begin building communicative abilities in German in all four language modalities: reading, listening, writing, and speaking. Instruction proceeds from guided to more creative and independent work. The courses incorporate a variety of activities that are based on a range of topics, text types, and different socio-cultural situations. Through diverse collaborative and individual tasks, students begin to find personal forms of expression that are based on these materials. Students learn basic strategies for reading, listening, and writing, and for participating in every-day conversations. In the process they become familiar with and learn to use with some confidence the major sentence patterns and grammatical features of German as well as high-frequency vocabulary of everyday life. Integration of current technology (e.g., the Internet, e-mail, video) familiarizes students with the German-speaking world while at the same time enhancing language learning.
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Interm German I GERM-021-10

Credits: 3
1st Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Tue 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Wed 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Thu 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM

Visiting students must take placement test prior to registering.

This course is the first half of the two-part course ...

This course is the first half of the two-part course sequence at Level II. The course is organized topically to familiarize students with contemporary life in the German-speaking world. In Intermediate I, students explore the following themes:

• Where home is: What does “Heimat” mean?
• National pride – a German debate
• From art to kitsch: the cultural city of Vienna

The primary text type that is used at this level to explore each theme is the story, — personal, public and literary stories. Students typically encounter each text first in class and then engage it further out of class in preparation for subsequent in-depth thematic discussions in class. Class discussions often involve role play and/or group work as a way to enhance conversational and negotiating abilities. The course’s emphasis on improving students ability to narrate, compare and contrast, express opinions, and establish causal relationships in speaking and writing lays the groundwork for the historical treatment of stories and histories in Level III.

By the end of the level II students
• will have a good understanding of contemporary life in the German-speaking world with some in-depth knowledge of major social, political and cultural issues;
• will be able to comprehend authentic materials ( video, native speaker conversation) with global comprehension and some fine point knowledge analysis;
• will be able to produce spoken and written discourse from description to narration, to formulation of argument and/or hypothesis, incorporating an increasing variety of style and complexity.
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Interm German II GERM-022-20

Credits: 3
2nd Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Tue 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Wed 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Thu 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM

Visiting students must take placement test prior to registering.

This course is the second half of the two-part course ...

This course is the second half of the two-part course sequence at Level II. The course is organized topically to familiarize students with contemporary life in the German-speaking world. In Intensive Intermediate, students explore the following themes:
• Nature, people, environment
• Fairy tales
• The German-speaking world from a view of a foreigner
The primary text type that is used at this level to explore each theme is the story, — personal, public and literary stories. Students typically encounter each text first in class and then engage it further out of class in preparation for subsequent in-depth thematic discussions in class. Class discussions often involve role play and/or group work as a way to enhance conversational and negotiating abilities. The course’s emphasis on improving students ability to narrate, compare and contrast, express opinions, and establish causal relationships in speaking and writing lays the groundwork for the historical treatment of stories and histories in Level III.

By the end of the level II students
• will have a good understanding of contemporary life in the German-speaking world with some in-depth knowledge of major social, political and cultural issues;
• will be able to comprehend authentic materials (video, native speaker conversation) with global comprehension and some fine point knowledge analysis;
• will be able to produce spoken and written discourse from description to narration, to formulation of argument and/or hypothesis, incorporating an increasing variety of style and complexity.
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International Relations GOVT-006-10

Credits: 3
1st Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM
  • Tue 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM
  • Wed 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM
  • Thu 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM
  • Fri 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM

This course is a broad introduction to the key theories ...

This course is a broad introduction to the key theories, concepts, and issues in international relations. It begins with a overview of the leading theoretical approaches to understanding international relations and then uses these frameworks to understand historical and contemporary events and issues, including international political economy, energy trade, the global environment, weapons of mass destruction, ethnic and civil conflicts, and terrorism.
This course counts for the International Relations distribution requirement.
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International Relations GOVT-006-20

Credits: 3
2nd Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 8:30 AM - 10:30 AM
  • Tue 8:30 AM - 10:30 AM
  • Wed 8:30 AM - 10:30 AM
  • Thu 8:30 AM - 10:30 AM

This course is a broad introduction to the key theories ...

This course is a broad introduction to the key theories, concepts, and issues in international relations. It begins with a overview of the leading theoretical approaches to understanding international relations and then uses these frameworks to understand historical and contemporary events and issues, including international political economy, energy trade, the global environment, weapons of mass destruction, ethnic and civil conflicts, and terrorism.
This course counts for the International Relations distribution requirement.
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International Relations GOVT-006-21

Credits: 3
2nd Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Tue 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Wed 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Thu 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM

This course is a broad introduction to the key theories ...

This course is a broad introduction to the key theories, concepts, and issues in international relations. It begins with a overview of the leading theoretical approaches to understanding international relations and then uses these frameworks to understand historical and contemporary events and issues, including international political economy, energy trade, the global environment, weapons of mass destruction, ethnic and civil conflicts, and terrorism.
This course counts for the International Relations distribution requirement.
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US Political Systems GOVT-008-10

Credits: 3
1st Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
  • Tue 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
  • Wed 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
  • Thu 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
  • Fri 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM

This course is designed to provide students with a broad ...

This course is designed to provide students with a broad understanding of the American political system. The first part of the course addresses the foundations of American politics, particularly the meaning of representative government and the role of elections. The second phase of the course considers the role of important institutions in American government including Congress, the Presidency, the courts, parties, and interest groups. The final section of the course addresses current controversies in public policy including the balance between national security and civil liberties, education reform, and health policy.
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US Political Systems GOVT-008-20

Credits: 3
2nd Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
  • Tue 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
  • Wed 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
  • Thu 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
  • Fri 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM

This course is designed to provide students with a broad ...

This course is designed to provide students with a broad understanding of the American political system. The first part of the course addresses the foundations of American politics, particularly the meaning of representative government and the role of elections. The second phase of the course considers the role of important institutions in American government including Congress, the Presidency, the courts, parties, and interest groups. The final section of the course addresses current controversies in public policy including the balance between national security and civil liberties, education reform, and health policy.
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Elements of Political Theory GOVT-117-10

Credits: 3
1st Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Tue 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Wed 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Thu 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM

The principal aim of this course is to provide an ...

The principal aim of this course is to provide an introduction to the field of political philosophy.

The texts to be read are among the most important works in the field covering a period of twenty-four hundred years. In order to give a comprehensive overview of the history of political thought,
we will be studying works written by Plato, Aristotle, Machiavelli, Locke, the authors of the Federalist Essays, and Marx. Each of these thinkers presents a different perspective concerning the best manner in which politics ought to be practiced. It is hoped that a thorough reading and comprehension of these works will (1) familiarize the student with the general concerns of political thought, (2) demonstrate that political thought is an ongoing dialogue among thinkers from various times and historical circumstances, and (3) suggest that some of the concerns that confronted philosophers centuries ago are still relevant to the problems of today.
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Comparative Political Systems GOVT-121-10

Credits: 3
1st Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Tue 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Wed 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Thu 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM

This course provides a general introduction to the concepts, methods ...

This course provides a general introduction to the concepts, methods, and substance of comparative politics. The focus will be on “doing” political science: using theories to help explain individual cases, and using cases to refine our theories of political behavior. In the first part of the course, we will discuss the nature of political science as a scholarly discipline and explore themes in comparative politics such as the relationship between ideology and political behavior, the articulation of political interests, group decision-making, and regime types. Next, we will use our knowledge of these concepts to help us understand current developments in a variety of geographical settings.

This course counts for the Comparative Government distribution requirement.
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Comparative Political Systems GOVT-121-20

Credits: 3
2nd Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Tue 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Wed 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Thu 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM

This course provides a general introduction to the concepts, methods ...

This course provides a general introduction to the concepts, methods, and substance of comparative politics. The focus will be on “doing” political science: using theories to help explain individual cases, and using cases to refine our theories of political behavior. In the first part of the course, we will discuss the nature of political science as a scholarly discipline and explore themes in comparative politics such as the relationship between ideology and political behavior, the articulation of political interests, group decision-making, and regime types. Next, we will use our knowledge of these concepts to help us understand current developments in a variety of geographical settings.

This course counts for the Comparative Government distribution requirement.
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Constitutional Law I GOVT-231-10

Credits: 3
1st Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM
  • Tue 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM
  • Wed 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM
  • Thu 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM
  • Fri 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM

A study of the American Constitution in light of judicial ...

A study of the American Constitution in light of judicial interpretation. After a brief examination of the judicial process and contemporary Supreme Court procedures, this course employs the case law approach to analyze major Court decisions. The focus will be on the Supreme Court’s evolving interpretation of how governmental power is distributed and checked based on the principles of separation of powers, federalism, and individual rights.

This course counts for the American Government distribution requirement.
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Presidntial Rhetoric GOVT-367-30

Credits: 3
Cross Session
Seminar
Day and Time
  • Mon 6:00 PM - 8:30 PM
  • Wed 6:00 PM - 8:30 PM

This course will be held at the downtown campus, located at 640 Massachusetts Avenue.

None
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Presidntial Rhetoric GOVT-367-35

Credits: 3
Cross Session
Seminar
Day and Time
  • Mon 6:00 PM - 8:30 PM
  • Wed 6:00 PM - 8:30 PM

This course will be held at the downtown campus, located at 640 Massachusetts Avenue.

None
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Third World Politics GOVT-404-20

Credits: 3
2nd Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Tue 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Wed 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Thu 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM

This course engages four major themes in “Third World” Politics ...

This course engages four major themes in “Third World” Politics. For historical perspective on current concerns we begin with the literature on colonialism and the state. The second part of the course addresses democracy and democratization. The third part of the course explores persistent authoritarianism in the Middle East and North Africa in light of the concepts, theories, and propositions in the democratization literature. Part four turns to socioeconomic development in the Third World. The major focus is on the role of the state in Late Developers. In conclusion, we turn to student research on the Politics of the Third World.
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Politics & Film GOVT-432-10

Credits: 3
1st Summer Session
Seminar
Day and Time
  • Mon 6:00 PM - 8:30 PM
  • Tue 6:00 PM - 8:30 PM
  • Wed 6:00 PM - 8:30 PM
  • Thu 6:00 PM - 8:30 PM

The important and long-standing interplay between politics and film is ...

The important and long-standing interplay between politics and film is the focus of this course. Three general questions characterize this examination. First, what ideological, chronological, or cultural differences mark different films focusing on a common political object, such as the American Dream or war? What accounts for these differences? Second, how political is an individual movie? How expansive should the definition of political content be? Third, how effective is the specific genre in conveying the intended political message? Are propaganda films really more effective than the indirect messages found in mainstream blockbusters?
We begin with a general overview of the film-politics relationship and a brief discussion of the various perspectives and theories that illuminate the connection. Next, we look at the most obvious political films: the propaganda movies Triumph of the Will and Birth of a Nation. Next we look at the documentary genre through a contemporary production Paragraph 175 and a classic, Wiseman’s Titicut Follies. A discussion of political satire follows, focused on Chaplin’s Great Dictator and South Park: Bigger, Longer and Uncut. The next section delves into Hollywood’s image of America and American politics. The first two films revolve around the presentation of the American Dream, exemplified by Citizen Kane, and Forrest Gump, movies separated by 50 years. Then we look at the more focused theme of the image of Washington politics through Capra’s classic Mr. Smith Goes to Washington and Wag the Dog.
On a different note, we discuss one of the most unexpectedly political films, Dangerous Liaisons, a study in political personality, power maximization and unadulterated competition. The last section thematizes war and genocide. In contrast to typical heroic representations of WWII, we look at a Japanese animated feature, Grave of the Fireflies, which reveals a substantially different cultural and political sensibility, as well as the Oscar-winning glimpse of Hitler’s last days, Downfall. For the Cold War we will analyze The Manchurian Candidate and From Russia with Love. Next comes The Deer Hunter, a masterpiece that best captures the pervasive malaise of the Vietnam War period, both at home and at the front. The final films delve into an historical theme with great contemporary political and ethical relevance: the Holocaust as depicted in Spielberg’s Schindler’s List and Holland’s Europa, Europa.
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Negotiating MIddle East Peace GOVT-448-20

Credits: 3
2nd Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Tue 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Wed 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Thu 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM

This course will deal with the history of the Arab-Israeli ...

This course will deal with the history of the Arab-Israeli conflict and the efforts to resolve it. One basic point to understand about the conflict is that it is not a morality play. One side is not all right and the other all wrong. That is not to say that they are equally responsible for what has happened, but it is to say that both have suffered and both would benefit enormously from ending the conflict and its animating grievances.

We will explore why each side tends to see the world the way it does, and why mythologies have taken hold of all sides and made reality hard to grasp. We will examine narratives of the Israelis, the Palestinians, and the Arabs more generally. Mindsets must be understood in any negotiation, and we will look at what shaped each side’s approach to the conflict historically as well as its approach to conflict resolution over the periods of the most intensive diplomacy. We will analyze how close the efforts in the year 2000 came to ending the conflict between Israelis and Palestinians and Israelis and Syrian, and will discuss what lessons must be learned from the past in order to shape a different future.

We will also consider the American role as well as that of outside parties in trying to resolve the conflict. Ultimately, the purpose of the course is to provide insight into why it has been so difficult to settle this conflict, and what, if anything can be done to settle it in the future.
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Forensic Analysis Victim Viol HEST-212-20

Credits: 3
2nd Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 1:00 PM - 3:30 PM
  • Wed 1:00 PM - 3:30 PM
  • Thu 1:00 PM - 3:30 PM

This course examines the wide range of victimization experiences from ...

This course examines the wide range of victimization experiences from the perspective of the victim, their families and society. Crimes to be studied include workplace violence, corporate crime, robbery, burglery, assault, rape, stalking, domestic violence, homicide, suicide, elderly abuse and child sexual abuse and exploitation. Emphasis will be given to exploring the elements of each crime and response patterns to victimizations. Services available to victims of crime will be discussed. Students will examine the reactions of victims and their families to the trauma of various crimes. Motivation for crime, stages of a crime and possible victim responses to crime will be discussed. Myths supporting a victim-blaming belief pattern will be explored within the overall social response of crime. Additionally, those institutions designed to provide assistance to victims will be examined, including counseling and support services, health care services, the police and the court system.
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Intro Early Hist: World I HIST-007-10

Credits: 3
1st Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 10:45 AM - 12:15 PM
  • Tue 10:45 AM - 12:15 PM
  • Wed 10:45 AM - 12:15 PM
  • Thu 10:45 AM - 12:15 PM
  • Fri 10:45 AM - 12:15 PM

The general education requirement in History for COLLEGE students changes with the Class of 2017. NOTE: the COLLEGE Class of 2016 may elect to pursue the new requirement or complete the old requirement. Old Requirement for COLLEGE Classes of 2014, 2015, and 2016: 1 Introductory Early or Late History. Student takes any section of either 007 or 008. 1 Second Introductory Early or Late History. Student completes the 007-008 sequence, OR takes the appropriate Early (111, 128, 158, 160) or Late (112, 129, 159, 161) Survey, so that student has covered both an Early and Late history course. New Requirement for the COLLEGE Class of 2017 and beyond. NOTE: the COLLEGE Class of 2016 may elect to pursue the new requirement: 1 introductory History survey: 007, 008, 111, 112, 128, 129, 158, 159, 160, or 161. 1 Hist Focus course: HIST 099, any section. Please see the Undergraduate Bulletin for details of these policies.

For College students in the Class of 2015, all sections ...

For College students in the Class of 2015, all sections of HIST 007 fulfill the general education requirement for one semester of Early History and fulfill this requirement at the introductory level. Thus, HIST 007 can be combined with a semester of Late History from either the introductory level (HIST 008), or HIST 112, 129, 159, or 161. Note that one semester of the two-semester history general education requirement must be at the introductory level.
For College students in the Class of 2017 and beyond, all sections of HIST 007 or HIST 008 fulfill the general education requirement in History for a broad introductory survey; these students complete the requirement by taking HIST 099.
The College Class of 2016 may elect to follow either the old or the new general education requirement in History.

The various sections of the course have different focuses, for which see below; moreover, each instructor may develop or stress particular themes within her/his focus. Students are urged to consult syllabi available on line or at the History Department.

The World I sections examine the history of the human experience from a global perspective. The bulk of the semester concerns societies and states from the time of ancient civilizations to about 1500 AD. The course pays particular attention to political, economic, and social changes, but also considers cultural, technological, and ecological history. The evolving relationship between human identities and their social and material environments forms one of the major points of analytical focus for this course. The overarching goal is to provide a general framework for the history of the world to help students understand the big picture, and to help them to contextualize what they will later study about history, politics, religion--in short, about the human experience.

The Atlantic World sections draw together the histories of four continents, Europe, Africa, North America, and South America, to investigate the new Atlantic world created as a consequence of the Columbian encounter in 1492. The class traces the creation of this world from the first European forays in the Atlantic and on the coast of Africa in the fifteenth century to the first wars for colonial independence and the abolition of slavery. Topics include the destruction and reconfiguration of indigenous societies; the crucial labor migrations of Europeans, Native Americans, and Africans; and the various strategies of accommodation, resistance, and rebellion demonstrated by the many different inhabitants of the Americas.

The Europe I sections offer an analysis of the major political, social, economic, diplomatic, religious, intellectual, and scientific developments in European Civilization to 1789. Special attention is also paid to issues of class, gender, marginality and the relationship of Europe to non-western cultures.
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Intro Early Hist: Europe I HIST-007-11

Credits: 3
1st Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 3:15 PM - 4:45 PM
  • Tue 3:15 PM - 4:45 PM
  • Wed 3:15 PM - 4:45 PM
  • Thu 3:15 PM - 4:45 PM
  • Fri 3:15 PM - 4:45 PM

The general education requirement in History for COLLEGE students changes with the Class of 2017. NOTE: the COLLEGE Class of 2016 may elect to pursue the new requirement or complete the old requirement. Old Requirement for COLLEGE Classes of 2014, 2015, and 2016: 1 Introductory Early or Late History. Student takes any section of either 007 or 008. 1 Second Introductory Early or Late History. Student completes the 007-008 sequence, OR takes the appropriate Early (111, 128, 158, 160) or Late (112, 129, 159, 161) Survey, so that student has covered both an Early and Late history course. New Requirement for the COLLEGE Class of 2017 and beyond. NOTE: the COLLEGE Class of 2016 may elect to pursue the new requirement: 1 introductory History survey: 007, 008, 111, 112, 128, 129, 158, 159, 160, or 161. 1 Hist Focus course: HIST 099, any section. Please see the Undergraduate Bulletin for details of these policies.

For College students in the Class of 2015, all sections ...

For College students in the Class of 2015, all sections of HIST 007 fulfill the general education requirement for one semester of Early History and fulfill this requirement at the introductory level. Thus, HIST 007 can be combined with a semester of Late History from either the introductory level (HIST 008), or HIST 112, 129, 159, or 161. Note that one semester of the two-semester history general education requirement must be at the introductory level.
For College students in the Class of 2017 and beyond, all sections of HIST 007 or HIST 008 fulfill the general education requirement in History for a broad introductory survey; these students complete the requirement by taking HIST 099.
The College Class of 2016 may elect to follow either the old or the new general education requirement in History.

The various sections of the course have different focuses, for which see below; moreover, each instructor may develop or stress particular themes within her/his focus. Students are urged to consult syllabi available on line or at the History Department.

The World I sections examine the history of the human experience from a global perspective. The bulk of the semester concerns societies and states from the time of ancient civilizations to about 1500 AD. The course pays particular attention to political, economic, and social changes, but also considers cultural, technological, and ecological history. The evolving relationship between human identities and their social and material environments forms one of the major points of analytical focus for this course. The overarching goal is to provide a general framework for the history of the world to help students understand the big picture, and to help them to contextualize what they will later study about history, politics, religion--in short, about the human experience.

The Atlantic World sections draw together the histories of four continents, Europe, Africa, North America, and South America, to investigate the new Atlantic world created as a consequence of the Columbian encounter in 1492. The class traces the creation of this world from the first European forays in the Atlantic and on the coast of Africa in the fifteenth century to the first wars for colonial independence and the abolition of slavery. Topics include the destruction and reconfiguration of indigenous societies; the crucial labor migrations of Europeans, Native Americans, and Africans; and the various strategies of accommodation, resistance, and rebellion demonstrated by the many different inhabitants of the Americas.

The Europe I sections offer an analysis of the major political, social, economic, diplomatic, religious, intellectual, and scientific developments in European Civilization to 1789. Special attention is also paid to issues of class, gender, marginality and the relationship of Europe to non-western cultures.
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Intro Early Hist: Atl. World HIST-007-20

Credits: 3
2nd Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
  • Tue 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
  • Wed 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
  • Thu 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
  • Fri 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM

The general education requirement in History for COLLEGE students changes with the Class of 2017. NOTE: the COLLEGE Class of 2016 may elect to pursue the new requirement or complete the old requirement. Old Requirement for COLLEGE Classes of 2014, 2015, and 2016: 1 Introductory Early or Late History. Student takes any section of either 007 or 008. 1 Second Introductory Early or Late History. Student completes the 007-008 sequence, OR takes the appropriate Early (111, 128, 158, 160) or Late (112, 129, 159, 161) Survey, so that student has covered both an Early and Late history course. New Requirement for the COLLEGE Class of 2017 and beyond. NOTE: the COLLEGE Class of 2016 may elect to pursue the new requirement: 1 introductory History survey: 007, 008, 111, 112, 128, 129, 158, 159, 160, or 161. 1 Hist Focus course: HIST 099, any section. Please see the Undergraduate Bulletin for details of these policies.

For College students in the Class of 2015, all sections ...

For College students in the Class of 2015, all sections of HIST 007 fulfill the general education requirement for one semester of Early History and fulfill this requirement at the introductory level. Thus, HIST 007 can be combined with a semester of Late History from either the introductory level (HIST 008), or HIST 112, 129, 159, or 161. Note that one semester of the two-semester history general education requirement must be at the introductory level.
For College students in the Class of 2017 and beyond, all sections of HIST 007 or HIST 008 fulfill the general education requirement in History for a broad introductory survey; these students complete the requirement by taking HIST 099.
The College Class of 2016 may elect to follow either the old or the new general education requirement in History.

The various sections of the course have different focuses, for which see below; moreover, each instructor may develop or stress particular themes within her/his focus. Students are urged to consult syllabi available on line or at the History Department.

The World I sections examine the history of the human experience from a global perspective. The bulk of the semester concerns societies and states from the time of ancient civilizations to about 1500 AD. The course pays particular attention to political, economic, and social changes, but also considers cultural, technological, and ecological history. The evolving relationship between human identities and their social and material environments forms one of the major points of analytical focus for this course. The overarching goal is to provide a general framework for the history of the world to help students understand the big picture, and to help them to contextualize what they will later study about history, politics, religion--in short, about the human experience.

The Atlantic World sections draw together the histories of four continents, Europe, Africa, North America, and South America, to investigate the new Atlantic world created as a consequence of the Columbian encounter in 1492. The class traces the creation of this world from the first European forays in the Atlantic and on the coast of Africa in the fifteenth century to the first wars for colonial independence and the abolition of slavery. Topics include the destruction and reconfiguration of indigenous societies; the crucial labor migrations of Europeans, Native Americans, and Africans; and the various strategies of accommodation, resistance, and rebellion demonstrated by the many different inhabitants of the Americas.

The Europe I sections offer an analysis of the major political, social, economic, diplomatic, religious, intellectual, and scientific developments in European Civilization to 1789. Special attention is also paid to issues of class, gender, marginality and the relationship of Europe to non-western cultures.
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Intro Late Hist: Pacific World HIST-008-10

Credits: 3
1st Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
  • Tue 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
  • Wed 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
  • Thu 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
  • Fri 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM

The general education requirement in History for COLLEGE students changes with the Class of 2017. NOTE: the COLLEGE Class of 2016 may elect to pursue the new requirement or complete the old requirement. Old Requirement for COLLEGE Classes of 2014, 2015, and 2016: 1 Introductory Early or Late History. Student takes any section of either 007 or 008. 1 Second Introductory Early or Late History. Student completes the 007-008 sequence, OR takes the appropriate Early (111, 128, 158, 160) or Late (112, 129, 159, 161) Survey, so that student has covered both an Early and Late history course. New Requirement for the COLLEGE Class of 2017 and beyond. NOTE: the COLLEGE Class of 2016 may elect to pursue the new requirement: 1 introductory History survey: 007, 008, 111, 112, 128, 129, 158, 159, 160, or 161. 1 Hist Focus course: HIST 099, any section. Please see the Undergraduate Bulletin for details of these policies.

For College students in the Class of 2015, all sections ...

For College students in the Class of 2015, all sections of HIST 008 fulfill the general education requirement for one semester of Late History and fulfill this requirement at the introductory level. Thus, HIST 008 can be combined with a semester of Early History from either the introductory level (HIST 007), or HIST 111, 128, 158, or 160. Note that one semester of the two-semester history general education requirement must be at the introductory level.
For College students in the Class of 2017 and beyond, all sections of HIST 008 or HIST 007 fulfill the general education requirement in History for a broad introductory survey; these students complete the requirement by taking HIST 099.
The College Class of 2016 may elect to follow either the old or the new general education requirement in History.

The various sections of the course have different focuses, for which see below; moreover, each instructor may develop or stress particular themes within her/his focus. Students are urged to consult syllabi available on line or at the History Department.

The World II sections consider human history since about 1500 AD, focusing on the dynamics of global interaction. The class seeks to familiarize students with, and help them contextualize, historical processes and phenomena such as colonialism and imperialism, industrialization, modern population growth, nationalism and the rise of the nation-state, great power politics, and the emergence of modern science. Its goal is to explain how the world got to be the way it is, with a particular focus on how social and ethno-cultural identities have been shaped--and have in turn shaped--political, economic, and physical environments.

The Pacific World sections focus on the Pacific Ocean world, which has historically been regarded as a vast and prohibitive void rather than an avenue for integration. Yet over the last five centuries motions of people, commodities, and capital have created important relationships between the diverse societies situated on the "Pacific Rim." This course examines the history of trans-Pacific interactions from 1500 to the present. It takes the ocean itself as the principal framework of analysis in order to bring into focus large-scale processes--migration, imperial expansion, cross-cultural trade, transfers of technology, cultural and religious exchange, and warfare and diplomacy. This "oceans connect" approach to world history brings these processes into sharp relief while also allowing for attention to the extraordinary diversity of cultures located within and around the Pacific.

The Europe II sections offer an analysis of the significant political, social, economic, diplomatic, religious, intellectual, and scientific developments in European Civilization since the eruption of the French Revolution. Special attention is also paid to issues of class, gender, marginality and the relationship of Europe to non-Western cultures.
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Intro Late Hist: World II HIST-008-20

Credits: 3
2nd Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 10:45 AM - 12:15 PM
  • Tue 10:45 AM - 12:15 PM
  • Wed 10:45 AM - 12:15 PM
  • Thu 10:45 AM - 12:15 PM
  • Fri 10:45 AM - 12:15 PM

The general education requirement in History for COLLEGE students changes with the Class of 2017. NOTE: the COLLEGE Class of 2016 may elect to pursue the new requirement or complete the old requirement. Old Requirement for COLLEGE Classes of 2014, 2015, and 2016: 1 Introductory Early or Late History. Student takes any section of either 007 or 008. 1 Second Introductory Early or Late History. Student completes the 007-008 sequence, OR takes the appropriate Early (111, 128, 158, 160) or Late (112, 129, 159, 161) Survey, so that student has covered both an Early and Late history course. New Requirement for the COLLEGE Class of 2017 and beyond. NOTE: the COLLEGE Class of 2016 may elect to pursue the new requirement: 1 introductory History survey: 007, 008, 111, 112, 128, 129, 158, 159, 160, or 161. 1 Hist Focus course: HIST 099, any section. Please see the Undergraduate Bulletin for details of these policies.

For College students in the Class of 2015, all sections ...

For College students in the Class of 2015, all sections of HIST 008 fulfill the general education requirement for one semester of Late History and fulfill this requirement at the introductory level. Thus, HIST 008 can be combined with a semester of Early History from either the introductory level (HIST 007), or HIST 111, 128, 158, or 160. Note that one semester of the two-semester history general education requirement must be at the introductory level.
For College students in the Class of 2017 and beyond, all sections of HIST 008 or HIST 007 fulfill the general education requirement in History for a broad introductory survey; these students complete the requirement by taking HIST 099.
The College Class of 2016 may elect to follow either the old or the new general education requirement in History.

The various sections of the course have different focuses, for which see below; moreover, each instructor may develop or stress particular themes within her/his focus. Students are urged to consult syllabi available on line or at the History Department.

The World II sections consider human history since about 1500 AD, focusing on the dynamics of global interaction. The class seeks to familiarize students with, and help them contextualize, historical processes and phenomena such as colonialism and imperialism, industrialization, modern population growth, nationalism and the rise of the nation-state, great power politics, and the emergence of modern science. Its goal is to explain how the world got to be the way it is, with a particular focus on how social and ethno-cultural identities have been shaped--and have in turn shaped--political, economic, and physical environments.

The Pacific World sections focus on the Pacific Ocean world, which has historically been regarded as a vast and prohibitive void rather than an avenue for integration. Yet over the last five centuries motions of people, commodities, and capital have created important relationships between the diverse societies situated on the "Pacific Rim." This course examines the history of trans-Pacific interactions from 1500 to the present. It takes the ocean itself as the principal framework of analysis in order to bring into focus large-scale processes--migration, imperial expansion, cross-cultural trade, transfers of technology, cultural and religious exchange, and warfare and diplomacy. This "oceans connect" approach to world history brings these processes into sharp relief while also allowing for attention to the extraordinary diversity of cultures located within and around the Pacific.

The Europe II sections offer an analysis of the significant political, social, economic, diplomatic, religious, intellectual, and scientific developments in European Civilization since the eruption of the French Revolution. Special attention is also paid to issues of class, gender, marginality and the relationship of Europe to non-Western cultures.
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Intro Late Hist: Europe II HIST-008-21

Credits: 3
2nd Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 3:15 PM - 4:45 PM
  • Tue 3:15 PM - 4:45 PM
  • Wed 3:15 PM - 4:45 PM
  • Thu 3:15 PM - 4:45 PM
  • Fri 3:15 PM - 4:45 PM

The general education requirement in History for COLLEGE students changes with the Class of 2017. NOTE: the COLLEGE Class of 2016 may elect to pursue the new requirement or complete the old requirement. Old Requirement for COLLEGE Classes of 2014, 2015, and 2016: 1 Introductory Early or Late History. Student takes any section of either 007 or 008. 1 Second Introductory Early or Late History. Student completes the 007-008 sequence, OR takes the appropriate Early (111, 128, 158, 160) or Late (112, 129, 159, 161) Survey, so that student has covered both an Early and Late history course. New Requirement for the COLLEGE Class of 2017 and beyond. NOTE: the COLLEGE Class of 2016 may elect to pursue the new requirement: 1 introductory History survey: 007, 008, 111, 112, 128, 129, 158, 159, 160, or 161. 1 Hist Focus course: HIST 099, any section. Please see the Undergraduate Bulletin for details of these policies.

For College students in the Class of 2015, all sections ...

For College students in the Class of 2015, all sections of HIST 008 fulfill the general education requirement for one semester of Late History and fulfill this requirement at the introductory level. Thus, HIST 008 can be combined with a semester of Early History from either the introductory level (HIST 007), or HIST 111, 128, 158, or 160. Note that one semester of the two-semester history general education requirement must be at the introductory level.
For College students in the Class of 2017 and beyond, all sections of HIST 008 or HIST 007 fulfill the general education requirement in History for a broad introductory survey; these students complete the requirement by taking HIST 099.
The College Class of 2016 may elect to follow either the old or the new general education requirement in History.

The various sections of the course have different focuses, for which see below; moreover, each instructor may develop or stress particular themes within her/his focus. Students are urged to consult syllabi available on line or at the History Department.

The World II sections consider human history since about 1500 AD, focusing on the dynamics of global interaction. The class seeks to familiarize students with, and help them contextualize, historical processes and phenomena such as colonialism and imperialism, industrialization, modern population growth, nationalism and the rise of the nation-state, great power politics, and the emergence of modern science. Its goal is to explain how the world got to be the way it is, with a particular focus on how social and ethno-cultural identities have been shaped--and have in turn shaped--political, economic, and physical environments.

The Pacific World sections focus on the Pacific Ocean world, which has historically been regarded as a vast and prohibitive void rather than an avenue for integration. Yet over the last five centuries motions of people, commodities, and capital have created important relationships between the diverse societies situated on the "Pacific Rim." This course examines the history of trans-Pacific interactions from 1500 to the present. It takes the ocean itself as the principal framework of analysis in order to bring into focus large-scale processes--migration, imperial expansion, cross-cultural trade, transfers of technology, cultural and religious exchange, and warfare and diplomacy. This "oceans connect" approach to world history brings these processes into sharp relief while also allowing for attention to the extraordinary diversity of cultures located within and around the Pacific.

The Europe II sections offer an analysis of the significant political, social, economic, diplomatic, religious, intellectual, and scientific developments in European Civilization since the eruption of the French Revolution. Special attention is also paid to issues of class, gender, marginality and the relationship of Europe to non-Western cultures.
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The Islamic World HIST-109-10

Credits: 3
1st Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
  • Tue 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
  • Wed 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
  • Thu 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
  • Fri 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM

This course will examine the history of the Islamic world ...

This course will examine the history of the Islamic world from its origins to the present. It is multi-regional in its coverage, examining the development of Muslim societies from sub-Saharan Africa to southeast Asia as they became part of the global community of the Islamic world. Attention will be given to the interaction between the shared Islamic identity and the distinctive local expressions of Muslim faith and life. Political, legal, social, artistic, and cultural dimensions of the Islamic historical experience will be discussed.
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Africa II HIST-112-10

Credits: 3
1st Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Tue 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Wed 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Thu 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM

The general education requirement in History for COLLEGE students changes with the Class of 2017. NOTE: the COLLEGE Class of 2016 may elect to pursue the new requirement or complete the old requirement. Old Requirement for COLLEGE Classes of 2014, 2015, and 2016: 1 Introductory Early or Late History. Student takes any section of either 007 or 008. 1 Second Introductory Early or Late History. Student completes the 007-008 sequence, OR takes the appropriate Early (111, 128, 158, 160) or Late (112, 129, 159, 161) Survey, so that student has covered both an Early and Late history course. New Requirement for the COLLEGE Class of 2017 and beyond. NOTE: the COLLEGE Class of 2016 may elect to pursue the new requirement: 1 introductory History survey: 007, 008, 111, 112, 128, 129, 158, 159, 160, or 161. 1 Hist Focus course: HIST 099, any section. Please see the Undergraduate Bulletin for details of these policies.

This course will examine European colonization of Africa and African ...

This course will examine European colonization of Africa and African resistance to colonial occupation; the colonial economy and society; African nationalism and the decolonization process; and the post-independence experience. 111 and 112 offer a better understanding of the diverse and complex histories of various geographical regions of Sub-Saharan Africa and the interaction of African communities with the global economy. Students will be exposed to a wide range of African film, literature, and music.
This course meets the general education requirement in History for College students in the Class of 2015, when taken in combination with an EARLY introductory-level history course (HIST 007).
For the College Class of 2017 and beyond, this course fulfills the general education requirement in History for a broad introductory survey; these students complete the requirement by taking HIST 099.
The College Class of 2016 may elect to follow either the old or the new general education requirement in History.
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Germany in the 20th Century HIST-139-01

Credits: 3
Presession
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 8:30 AM - 10:30 AM
  • Tue 8:30 AM - 10:30 AM
  • Wed 8:30 AM - 10:30 AM
  • Thu 8:30 AM - 10:30 AM
  • Fri 8:30 AM - 10:30 AM

Latin America I HIST-158-10

Credits: 3
1st Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM
  • Tue 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM
  • Wed 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM
  • Thu 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM
  • Fri 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM

The general education requirement in History for COLLEGE students changes with the Class of 2017. NOTE: the COLLEGE Class of 2016 may elect to pursue the new requirement or complete the old requirement. Old Requirement for COLLEGE Classes of 2014, 2015, and 2016: 1 Introductory Early or Late History. Student takes any section of either 007 or 008. 1 Second Introductory Early or Late History. Student completes the 007-008 sequence, OR takes the appropriate Early (111, 128, 158, 160) or Late (112, 129, 159, 161) Survey, so that student has covered both an Early and Late history course. New Requirement for the COLLEGE Class of 2017 and beyond. NOTE: the COLLEGE Class of 2016 may elect to pursue the new requirement: 1 introductory History survey: 007, 008, 111, 112, 128, 129, 158, 159, 160, or 161. 1 Hist Focus course: HIST 099, any section. Please see the Undergraduate Bulletin for details of these policies.

An introduction to the histories and cultures of Latin America ...

An introduction to the histories and cultures of Latin America and the Caribbean. The course begins with pre-Hispanic societies, primarily the Aztec and the Inca domains, but with attention to diverse indigenous peoples. It goes on to explore conquest, colonialism, and culture change in Spanish America, and the development of slave societies in Brazil and the Caribbean.
This course meets the general education requirement in History for College students in the Class of 2015, when taken in combination with a LATE introductory-level history course (HIST 008).
For the College Class of 2017 and beyond, this course fulfills the general education requirement in History for a broad introductory survey; these students complete the requirement by taking HIST 099.
The College Class of 2016 may elect to follow either the old or the new general education requirement in History.
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Latin America II HIST-159-20

Credits: 3
2nd Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM
  • Tue 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM
  • Wed 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM
  • Thu 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM
  • Fri 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM

The general education requirement in History for COLLEGE students changes with the Class of 2017. NOTE: the COLLEGE Class of 2016 may elect to pursue the new requirement or complete the old requirement. Old Requirement for COLLEGE Classes of 2014, 2015, and 2016: 1 Introductory Early or Late History. Student takes any section of either 007 or 008. 1 Second Introductory Early or Late History. Student completes the 007-008 sequence, OR takes the appropriate Early (111, 128, 158, 160) or Late (112, 129, 159, 161) Survey, so that student has covered both an Early and Late history course. New Requirement for the COLLEGE Class of 2017 and beyond. NOTE: the COLLEGE Class of 2016 may elect to pursue the new requirement: 1 introductory History survey: 007, 008, 111, 112, 128, 129, 158, 159, 160, or 161. 1 Hist Focus course: HIST 099, any section. Please see the Undergraduate Bulletin for details of these policies.

This course explores the period from independence to the present ...

This course explores the period from independence to the present. The course is divided into three sections. First, it discusses some of the salient issues of the nineteenth century in a thematic format, such as frontier societies, the role of the peasants, and the phenomenon of caudillismo. The second section provides an overview of the national political histories of most Latin American countries, whereas the third section returns to a thematic forma, providing analysis of important topics such as the role of women, U.S.-Latin American relations, structural adjustment policies, and the drug trade. The course uses as examples the lives of ordinary and extraordinary Latin Americans to illustrate the analysis.
This course meets the general education requirement in History for College students in the Class of 2015, when taken in combination with an EARLY introductory-level history course (HIST 007).
For the College Class of 2017 and beyond, this course fulfills the general education requirement in History for a broad introductory survey; these students complete the requirement by taking HIST 099.
The College Class of 2016 may elect to follow either the old or the new general education requirement in History.
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Middle East I HIST-160-10

Credits: 3
1st Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 3:15 PM - 4:45 PM
  • Tue 3:15 PM - 4:45 PM
  • Wed 3:15 PM - 4:45 PM
  • Thu 3:15 PM - 4:45 PM
  • Fri 3:15 PM - 4:45 PM

The general education requirement in History for COLLEGE students changes with the Class of 2017. NOTE: the COLLEGE Class of 2016 may elect to pursue the new requirement or complete the old requirement. Old Requirement for COLLEGE Classes of 2014, 2015, and 2016: 1 Introductory Early or Late History. Student takes any section of either 007 or 008. 1 Second Introductory Early or Late History. Student completes the 007-008 sequence, OR takes the appropriate Early (111, 128, 158, 160) or Late (112, 129, 159, 161) Survey, so that student has covered both an Early and Late history course. New Requirement for the COLLEGE Class of 2017 and beyond. NOTE: the COLLEGE Class of 2016 may elect to pursue the new requirement: 1 introductory History survey: 007, 008, 111, 112, 128, 129, 158, 159, 160, or 161. 1 Hist Focus course: HIST 099, any section. Please see the Undergraduate Bulletin for details of these policies.

The course examines the principal social, cultural, economic and political ...

The course examines the principal social, cultural, economic and political features of the Muslim world from the late sixth to the early sixteenth centuries. It focuses on the geo-strategic and cultural conditions that attended the rise of the new monotheistic faith of Islam; the formation and evolution of classical and medieval Muslim institutions; the local diversities within the unifying systems of Muslim beliefs, law, and administration; the material and intellectual exchanges and interactions between the Muslim world and non-Muslim communities and polities; and Muslim reactions to the Crusades and the Mongol invasions of the eleventh-thirteenth centuries.
This course meets the general education requirement in History for College students in the Class of 2015, when taken in combination with a LATE introductory-level history course (HIST 008).
For the College Class of 2017 and beyond, this course fulfills the general education requirement in History for a broad introductory survey; these students complete the requirement by taking HIST 099.
The College Class of 2016 may elect to follow either the old or the new general education requirement in History.
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Middle East II HIST-161-20

Credits: 3
2nd Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 3:15 PM - 4:45 PM
  • Tue 3:15 PM - 4:45 PM
  • Wed 3:15 PM - 4:45 PM
  • Thu 3:15 PM - 4:45 PM
  • Fri 3:15 PM - 4:45 PM

The general education requirement in History for COLLEGE students changes with the Class of 2017. NOTE: the COLLEGE Class of 2016 may elect to pursue the new requirement or complete the old requirement. Old Requirement for COLLEGE Classes of 2014, 2015, and 2016: 1 Introductory Early or Late History. Student takes any section of either 007 or 008. 1 Second Introductory Early or Late History. Student completes the 007-008 sequence, OR takes the appropriate Early (111, 128, 158, 160) or Late (112, 129, 159, 161) Survey, so that student has covered both an Early and Late history course. New Requirement for the COLLEGE Class of 2017 and beyond. NOTE: the COLLEGE Class of 2016 may elect to pursue the new requirement: 1 introductory History survey: 007, 008, 111, 112, 128, 129, 158, 159, 160, or 161. 1 Hist Focus course: HIST 099, any section. Please see the Undergraduate Bulletin for details of these policies.

The course outlines the factors that have shaped the political ...

The course outlines the factors that have shaped the political and social features of the modern Middle East from 1500 to the present. Its geographic scope comprises the central provinces and territories of the former Ottoman and Safavid empires: Turkey, Iraq, Syria, Palestine, Egypt, Arabia, and Iran. The syllabus emphasizes three analytical themes: first, the historical evolution of "Middle Eastern" polities from dynastic and religious empires in the 16th century to modern "nation-states" in the 20th; second, the impact of industrial capitalism and European imperial expansion on local societies and their modes of production; and third, the socio-cultural and ideological dimensions of these large-scale transformations, specifically the rise of mass ideologies of liberation and development (nationalism, socialism, rights movements, political Islam), and the emergence of structural and social imbalances (economic polarization, cultural/ethnic conflicts, demographic growth, urbanization).
This course meets the general education requirement in History for College students in the Class of 2015, when taken in combination with an EARLY introductory-level history course (HIST 007).
For the College Class of 2017 and beyond, this course fulfills the general education requirement in History for a broad introductory survey; these students complete the requirement by taking HIST 099.
The College Class of 2016 may elect to follow either the old or the new general education requirement in History.
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History of Terrorism HIST-479-30

Credits: 3
Cross Session
Seminar
Day and Time
  • Tue 6:00 PM - 8:30 PM
  • Thu 6:00 PM - 8:30 PM

This course will be held at the downtown campus, located at 640 Massachusetts Avenue, NW.

Why have some people over at least the past 2000 ...

Why have some people over at least the past 2000 years, spanning the entire globe, and outside of organized militaries or armed rebellions, induced themselves or others to employ violence – not only targeted killings, but even mass murder of civilians – and sometimes their own folk? This reading and writing course, starting with the extreme wing of the Judaean Zealots and their like-minded Ancient ilk, continuing with the mediaeval Assassins and Millenarians, picking up again with most radical nationalists, anarchists, and social revolutionaries of the 19th and 20th centuries, and concluding with the religious and non-religious theorists and practitioners terror tactics, will examine both the ideas behind such actions and the actions themselves. Students are at liberty to select a special individual or group for their specific research, analysis, writing, and oral presentation.
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Intro to Justice & Peace JUPS-123-10

Credits: 3
1st Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Tue 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Wed 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Thu 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM

What are better ways of understanding the concepts and core ...

What are better ways of understanding the concepts and core practices of
peace and justice? What are the movements and structures that contribute
to justice and peace? What are the obstacles? And what can societies and
persons do to make this a more just and peaceful world? These are some
of the questions we will examine through readings, discussions, a group
conflict transformation project that focuses on "hot spots" around the
world, and guest speakers. Students may opt to do a semester-long
community-based learning placement with a justice and peace
organization. The course will include regular student-facilitated
discussions and require active participation, approximately 25 pages of
written work, and a final examination.
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CBL: Intro to Justice & Peace JUPS-123-11

Credits: 3
1st Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Tue 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Wed 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Thu 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM

What are better ways of understanding the concepts and core ...

What are better ways of understanding the concepts and core practices of
peace and justice? What are the movements and structures that contribute
to justice and peace? What are the obstacles? And what can societies and
persons do to make this a more just and peaceful world? These are some
of the questions we will examine through readings, discussions, a group
conflict transformation project that focuses on "hot spots" around the
world, and guest speakers. Students may opt to do a semester-long
community-based learning placement with a justice and peace
organization. The course will include regular student-facilitated
discussions and require active participation, approximately 25 pages of
written work, and a final examination.
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Cross-Cultural Communication LING-333-10

Credits: 3
1st Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 8:30 AM - 10:30 AM
  • Tue 8:30 AM - 10:30 AM
  • Wed 8:30 AM - 10:30 AM
  • Thu 8:30 AM - 10:30 AM


This course approaches cross cultural communication from the perspective of ...


This course approaches cross cultural communication from the perspective of interactional sociolinguistics and explores the connections between language and culture by investigating some of the aspects of language use that vary by culture. These include turn taking, politeness and conversational rituals. The course will also survey differences that arise when cultures intersect; particular attention is paid to interactions between different genders and generations, interactions in professional settings, and interactions via social media. Roughly the first quarter of the course will be spent training students to investigate these devices in language data. Later on students will explore cross cultural communication in institutional contexts, such as education, politics, and medicine. Class time will be divided between lectures, class-wide and small group discussions, and hands-on data collection and analysis activities. Students will complete regular writing assignments based on the readings, field notes, one written project, as well as a final exam.
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Principles of Marketing MARK-220-10

Credits: 3
1st Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Tue 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Wed 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Thu 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM

A first course on tools and approaches for making marketing ...

A first course on tools and approaches for making marketing decisions. Marketing is viewed as a broad technology for influencing behavior, beyond functions like selling and advertising. Topics covered include consumer behavior, marketing research, and marketing planning, with emphasis on marketing mix decisions: product strategy, communications, pricing, and distribution. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.
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International Business MARK-261-20

Credits: 3
2nd Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Tue 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Wed 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Thu 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM

A first course in the theory and practice of international ...

A first course in the theory and practice of international business. After building a foundation of international trade, foreign direct investment, exchange rates, and government policy, the course emphasis is on the application of concepts to the solution of international business problems. It focuses on areas such as international market entry, the internationalization of the marketing, finance and management functions within the firm, and the development of global business strategies.
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Pre-Calculus MATH-001-20

Credits: 3
2nd Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Tue 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Wed 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Thu 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM

Prerequisite Algebra II.

None
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Calculus I MATH-035-01

Credits: 4
Presession
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 1:00 PM - 3:40 PM
  • Tue 1:00 PM - 3:40 PM
  • Wed 1:00 PM - 3:40 PM
  • Thu 1:00 PM - 3:40 PM
  • Fri 1:00 PM - 3:40 PM

This is the first part of the four semester calculus ...

This is the first part of the four semester calculus sequence (Math-035-036 and 137-150) for mathematics and science majors. Students do not need to have any familiarity with calculus, but do need good algebra/precalculus preparation.

Topics include limits, derivatives, techniques of differentiation, applications of the derivative, the Riemann integral, the trigonometric and inverse trigonometric functions, and the logarithmic and exponential functions. Fall and Spring.
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Calculus I MATH-035-10

Credits: 4
1st Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 3:40 PM - 6:20 PM
  • Tue 3:40 PM - 6:20 PM
  • Wed 3:40 PM - 6:20 PM
  • Thu 3:40 PM - 6:20 PM

This is the first part of the four semester calculus ...

This is the first part of the four semester calculus sequence (Math-035-036 and 137-150) for mathematics and science majors. Students do not need to have any familiarity with calculus, but do need good algebra/precalculus preparation.

Topics include limits, derivatives, techniques of differentiation, applications of the derivative, the Riemann integral, the trigonometric and inverse trigonometric functions, and the logarithmic and exponential functions. Fall and Spring.
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Calculus I MATH-035-20

Credits: 4
2nd Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 1:00 PM - 3:40 PM
  • Tue 1:00 PM - 3:40 PM
  • Wed 1:00 PM - 3:40 PM
  • Thu 1:00 PM - 3:40 PM

Students need to have taken Calculus with Review (MATH-029).

This is the first part of the four semester calculus ...

This is the first part of the four semester calculus sequence (Math-035-036 and 137-150) for mathematics and science majors. Students do not need to have any familiarity with calculus, but do need good algebra/precalculus preparation.

Topics include limits, derivatives, techniques of differentiation, applications of the derivative, the Riemann integral, the trigonometric and inverse trigonometric functions, and the logarithmic and exponential functions. Fall and Spring.
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Calculus II MATH-036-20

Credits: 4
2nd Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 3:00 PM - 5:40 PM
  • Tue 3:00 PM - 5:40 PM
  • Wed 3:00 PM - 5:40 PM
  • Thu 3:00 PM - 5:40 PM

Prerequisite Calculus I.

A continuation of MATH-035.

Topics include techniques of integration, applications ...

A continuation of MATH-035.

Topics include techniques of integration, applications of the definite integral, improper integrals, Newton's method and numerical integration, sequences and series including Taylor's theorem and power series, and elementary separable and first and second order linear differential equations. Fall and Spring.
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Probability and Statistics MATH-040-10

Credits: 4
1st Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 10:45 AM - 1:25 PM
  • Tue 10:45 AM - 1:25 PM
  • Wed 10:45 AM - 1:25 PM
  • Thu 10:45 AM - 1:25 PM

Cannot be taken for credit if the student has already taken ECON 121, OPIM 173, IPOL 320 or MATH 140.

This course will introduce students to the basic concepts, logic ...

This course will introduce students to the basic concepts, logic, and issues involved in statistical reasoning, as well as basic statistical methods used to analyze data and evaluate studies.
The major topics to be covered include methods for exploratory data analysis, an introduction to sampling and experimental design, elementary probability theory and random variables, and methods for statistical inference including simple linear regression.
The objectives of this course are to help students develop a critical approach to the evaluation of study designs, data and results, and to develop skills in the application of basic statistical methods in empirical research. An important feature of the course will be the use of statistical software to facilitate the understanding of important statistical ideas and for the implementation of data analysis. The course has two lectures and one lab section.

Cannot be taken for credit if the student has already taken ECON 121, Gov 201, OPIM 173, IPOL 320 or MATH 140.

College Economics and Political Economy majors should enroll in ECON 121, rather than MATH 040.

This course does NOT satisfy the Mathematics minor or majors requirement for a Statistics class--these students should enroll in MATH 140.

Seniors and Post Baccalaureate Pre-Medical students must get special permission to enroll in this course.
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Probability and Statistics MATH-040-20

Credits: 4
2nd Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 3:10 PM - 5:50 PM
  • Tue 3:10 PM - 5:50 PM
  • Wed 3:10 PM - 5:50 PM
  • Thu 3:10 PM - 5:50 PM

Cannot be taken for credit if the student has already taken ECON 121, OPIM 173, IPOL 320 or MATH 140.

This course will introduce students to the basic concepts, logic ...

This course will introduce students to the basic concepts, logic, and issues involved in statistical reasoning, as well as basic statistical methods used to analyze data and evaluate studies.
The major topics to be covered include methods for exploratory data analysis, an introduction to sampling and experimental design, elementary probability theory and random variables, and methods for statistical inference including simple linear regression.
The objectives of this course are to help students develop a critical approach to the evaluation of study designs, data and results, and to develop skills in the application of basic statistical methods in empirical research. An important feature of the course will be the use of statistical software to facilitate the understanding of important statistical ideas and for the implementation of data analysis. The course has two lectures and one lab section.

Cannot be taken for credit if the student has already taken ECON 121, Gov 201, OPIM 173, IPOL 320 or MATH 140.

College Economics and Political Economy majors should enroll in ECON 121, rather than MATH 040.

This course does NOT satisfy the Mathematics minor or majors requirement for a Statistics class--these students should enroll in MATH 140.

Seniors and Post Baccalaureate Pre-Medical students must get special permission to enroll in this course.
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Multivariable Calculus MATH-137-10

Credits: 4
1st Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 1:00 PM - 3:40 PM
  • Tue 1:00 PM - 3:40 PM
  • Wed 1:00 PM - 3:40 PM
  • Thu 1:00 PM - 3:40 PM

Prerequisite Calculus II

This is a first course in differential and integral calculus ...

This is a first course in differential and integral calculus of functions of several variables. After the introduction of vectors and the 2 and 3-dimensional Euclidean space, functions of several variables are discussed. Functions of two variables will be visualized by surfaces in the three-dimensional space. Further topics include partial derivatives and the total derivative of real-valued and vector-valued functions, the chain rule, directional derivatives, extrema of real-valued functions, constrained extrema and Lagrange multipliers, double and triple integrals, and the change of variables formula in multiple integrals.

This course consists of two 75-minute lectures and one 50-minute recitation section.
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Linear Algebra MATH-150-20

Credits: 4
2nd Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Tue 10:45 AM - 1:25 PM
 
Lecture
  • Mon 10:45 AM - 1:25 PM
  • Wed 10:45 AM - 1:25 PM
  • Thu 10:45 AM - 1:25 PM

Prerequisite calculus II

Normally taken after MATH-137.

This course presents the basic theory ...

Normally taken after MATH-137.

This course presents the basic theory and methods of finite dimensional vector spaces and linear transformations on them. Topics include: matrices and systems of linear equations; vector spaces, bases, and dimension; linear transformations, kernel, image, matrix representation, basis change, and rank; scalar products and orthogonality; determinants; eigenvalues, eigenvectors, diagonalization of symmetric matrices, positive definite matrices. Fall and Spring.
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Management & Org Behavior MGMT-201-10

Credits: 3
1st Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Tue 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Wed 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Thu 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM

This course is a comprehensive overview of the management process ...

This course is a comprehensive overview of the management process and organizational behavior from a behavioral and social science perspective. Topics include: management across cultures; managing with ethics and social responsibility; fundamentals of organizing; organizational culture and design; leadership; motivation; communication; interpersonal skills; teamwork and group dynamics; goal-setting; alternative work arrangements; power and politics; conflict and negotiation; managing change; and management development. Emphasis is on the analysis and understanding of human behavior in organizations.
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Business Statistics OPIM-173-10

Credits: 3
1st Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM
  • Tue 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM
  • Wed 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM
  • Thu 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM
  • Fri 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM

This course introduces the basic concepts of Statistics and their ...

This course introduces the basic concepts of Statistics and their application in managerial decision-making. In the first part of the course, we consider the steps of data collection, preliminary data analysis (numerical and graphical), probability and uncertainty, statistical inference. In the second part of the course, we examine statistical model building for the purposes of understanding variability and making forecasts. A detailed development of multiple regression analysis is complemented by some study of time series analysis. The objective is to demonstrate the effectiveness of statistical modeling in guiding managerial decision-making. The statistical analysis of large data sets is an integral part of modern business practice. Accordingly, both spreadsheets and statistical software will be used throughout the course.
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Intensive 1st Level Persian I PERS-011-10

Credits: 6
1st Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Tue 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Wed 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Thu 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Fri 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM

Not for native speakers of Persian. There is no pass/fail option for this course. Please contact the Summer and Special Programs Office at (202) 687-8200 for more information.

This course introduces students to the basic structures of the ...

This course introduces students to the basic structures of the Persian language. All four language skills: speaking, listening comprehension, reading comprehension, and writing will be taught equally using the immersion method. This method will help students achieve confidence communicating in the Persian language. Aspects of Persian culture will be introduced on a regular basis. At the end of this course, students will be able to:
1. Have basic level conversation in Persian: 1st level 5 minutes, 2nd level 10 minutes.
2. Read texts of elementary level: 1st level 50- 100 2nd level 100-200 words.
3. Write short paragraphs with reasonable accuracy: 1st level 50- 100 2nd level 100-200 words.
4. Develop cultural awareness through readings, films, music, etc.
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Intensive 1st Level Persian II PERS-012-20

Credits: 6
2nd Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Tue 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Wed 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Thu 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Fri 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM

Successful completion of PERS 011 or permission of the instructor. There is no pass/fail option for this course. Visiting students must take a placement test prior to registering for this course. Please contact the Summer and Special Programs Office at (202) 687-8200 for more information.

This course introduces students to the basic structures of the ...

This course introduces students to the basic structures of the Persian language. All four language skills: speaking, listening comprehension, reading comprehension, and writing will be taught equally using the immersion method. This method will help students achieve confidence communicating in the Persian language. Aspects of Persian culture will be introduced on a regular basis. At the end of this course, students will be able to:
1. Have basic level conversation in Persian: 1st level 5 minutes, 2nd level 10 minutes.
2. Read texts of elementary level: 1st level 50- 100 2nd level 100-200 words.
3. Write short paragraphs with reasonable accuracy: 1st level 50- 100 2nd level 100-200 words.
4. Develop cultural awareness through readings, films, music, etc.
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Intensive 2nd Level Pers I PERS-021-10

Credits: 6
1st Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Tue 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Wed 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Thu 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Fri 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM

Requires successful completion of PERS 012 or permission of instructor. There is no pass/fail option for this course. Visiting students must take a placement test prior to registering for this course. Please contact the Summer and Special Programs Office at (202) 687-8200 for more information.

Permission needed from Instructor. This intensive intermediate level I course ...

Permission needed from Instructor. This intensive intermediate level I course is designed to continue developing the student's communicative skills (reading, writing, listening, and speaking). This course is conducted in the target language. Initially, it affords students a view of basic Persian, then an introduction to more complex syntactic grammatical forms. Aspects of Persian history, culture, and contemporary life are also introduced through readings, listening materials, videos and films, and through the use of language technologies (web tools). The students will also be given practice in reading aloud and giving oral presentations of materials taken from the web, media, and television broadcast. As a final project, students will write a composition of 200-350 words (Intermed. I), 400-500 words (Intermed.II).
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Intensive 2nd Level Pers II PERS-022-20

Credits: 6
2nd Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Tue 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Wed 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Thu 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Fri 8:30 AM - 11:45 AM

Requires successful completion of PERS 021 or permission of instructor. There is no pass/fail option for this course. Visiting students must take a placement test prior to registering for this course. Please contact the Summer and Special Programs Office at (202) 687-8200 for more information.

Permission needed from Instructor. This intensive intermediate level I course ...

Permission needed from Instructor. This intensive intermediate level I course is designed to continue developing the student's communicative skills (reading, writing, listening, and speaking). This course is conducted in the target language. Initially, it affords students a view of basic Persian, then an introduction to more complex syntactic grammatical forms. Aspects of Persian history, culture, and contemporary life are also introduced through readings, listening materials, videos and films, and through the use of language technologies (web tools). The students will also be given practice in reading aloud and giving oral presentations of materials taken from the web, media, and television broadcast. As a final project, students will write a composition of 200-350 words (Intermed. I), 400-500 words (Intermed.II).
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Intro to Ethics PHIL-010-01

Credits: 3
Presession
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Tue 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Wed 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Thu 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Fri 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM

An Introduction to Ethics is taught in the FALL, SPRING ...

An Introduction to Ethics is taught in the FALL, SPRING, and SUMMER semesters. Please scroll down page to view individual section course descriptions:



FALL 2014

Sections 1 - 11
Stohr, Karen

COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course is an introduction to the study of philosophical ethics, understood as both a subject for theoretical reflection and a practical guide for how to live. We will explore the views of the West’s greatest ethical thinkers, both past and present, and we will use narratives from literature and film to illuminate the ethical issues they raise. The course begins with an exploration of the moral self, including conceptions of happiness, virtue, character, integrity, moral responsibility, and friendship. We will move from there to a discussion of ethical issues that arise out of interactions with others here at Georgetown, focusing on respect and self-respect. We will use philosophical readings to help us think reflectively about competition, academic honesty, alcohol use, and sexual relationships. Finally, we will broaden our outlook to more global ethical issues, with an emphasis on our role as agents capable of affecting the future of the planet. We will discuss the effects of our actions on impoverished people around the globe, animals, and the environment. We’ll conclude with a discussion of justice and the conduct of war. Please note that this course will be part of the Engelhard Project.

COURSE GOALS
o Students will appreciate the importance of theoretical ethical reflection in the effective resolution of practical ethical problems.
o Students will acquire the tools needed to locate and articulate the important points of disagreement between people on opposing sides of controversial issues.
o Students will cultivate the skill of critically evaluating ethical views and arguments.
o Students will learn how to construct philosophically sound ethical arguments of their own.
o Students will improve their ability to engage in respectful discussion of divisive moral issues
o Students will gain new insights into ethical problems arising in their daily lives.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS
Students will be expected to attend two lectures per week and one discussion section. Two papers will be required, along with a take-home, essay-based midterm and final exam.

TEXTBOOKS
Moral Philosophy: A Reader, edited by Louis Pojman and Peter Tramel, 4th edition Hackett, 2009). ISBN-13: 978-0-87220-962-6.

A Rulebook for Arguments, Anthony Weston, 4th edition (Hackett, 2008). ISBN-13: 978-0-87220-954-1

Lectures on Ethics, Immanuel Kant, trans. Louis Infield (Hackett, 1963). ISBN 0-915144-26-3.

Section 12
Murphy, Mark.

A lot of people think that the correct response to questions about what is morally right or morally wrong is a sort of skepticism: either there is no such thing as moral rightness and wrongness or, at the very least, we cannot have any confidence in any of our answers to these questions. There is somewhat less skepticism, though, about the idea of what people have good reason to do. In this course, we are going to think together about the various factors that are relevant to whether one has good reason to do something. We will then consider how reflection on these questions about good reasons is relevant to thinking clearly about morality. There is no textbook; all readings will be placed on reserve. Four short papers, two exams, and prepared and active attendance are required.

Section 13
Withy, Katherine

In this course, we will (i) explore the philosophical bases of contemporary moral intuitions and (ii) work collaboratively to develop the skills of philosophical writing and argument. By reading classic primary texts, we will explore the history of Western ethical thought in Aristotle (virtue ethics), Kant (deontology), Mill (utilitarianism), and Nietzsche (nihilism). We will end by taking a critical look at the modern ideal of being authentic, and our contemporary condition generally (Charles Taylor, Charles Guignon, Albert Borgmann). Students will learn to read difficult texts closely and to analyse the logical structure of arguments and concepts. We will also spend significant class time discussing and practising effective writing at the sentence-, paragraph- and paper-levels. In addition to a final 1500-word paper, students will submit weekly assignments demonstrating particular writing skills, and will peer-review one another’s work to consolidate those skills. All readings will be available on the course site, but a course packet can also be purchased from the bookstore.

Section 14
Lichtenberg, Judith

One aim of the course is to ask, and try to answer, some basic ethical questions. Are people fundamentally self-interested? Why should a person act morally? Does morality require a religious foundation? (Or, as Dostoevsky put it, is everything permitted if God is dead?) Is there a universal morality that applies across cultures?
To get a better understanding of these issues we will read some of the great philosophers, including Plato, Aristotle, Immanuel Kant, and John Stuart Mill—who articulated theories and ideas that continue to inform thinking about ethics today—as well as some work of contemporary philosophers.
Utilizing these writings, we will also investigate some contemporary moral problems facing individuals as well as societies. Possible topics include punishment and the criminal justice system; abortion; the moral status of nonhuman animals; poverty and inequality.
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Intro to Ethics PHIL-010-10

Credits: 3
1st Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Tue 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Wed 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Thu 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM

An Introduction to Ethics is taught in the FALL, SPRING ...

An Introduction to Ethics is taught in the FALL, SPRING, and SUMMER semesters. Please scroll down page to view individual section course descriptions:



FALL 2014

Sections 1 - 11
Stohr, Karen

COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course is an introduction to the study of philosophical ethics, understood as both a subject for theoretical reflection and a practical guide for how to live. We will explore the views of the West’s greatest ethical thinkers, both past and present, and we will use narratives from literature and film to illuminate the ethical issues they raise. The course begins with an exploration of the moral self, including conceptions of happiness, virtue, character, integrity, moral responsibility, and friendship. We will move from there to a discussion of ethical issues that arise out of interactions with others here at Georgetown, focusing on respect and self-respect. We will use philosophical readings to help us think reflectively about competition, academic honesty, alcohol use, and sexual relationships. Finally, we will broaden our outlook to more global ethical issues, with an emphasis on our role as agents capable of affecting the future of the planet. We will discuss the effects of our actions on impoverished people around the globe, animals, and the environment. We’ll conclude with a discussion of justice and the conduct of war. Please note that this course will be part of the Engelhard Project.

COURSE GOALS
o Students will appreciate the importance of theoretical ethical reflection in the effective resolution of practical ethical problems.
o Students will acquire the tools needed to locate and articulate the important points of disagreement between people on opposing sides of controversial issues.
o Students will cultivate the skill of critically evaluating ethical views and arguments.
o Students will learn how to construct philosophically sound ethical arguments of their own.
o Students will improve their ability to engage in respectful discussion of divisive moral issues
o Students will gain new insights into ethical problems arising in their daily lives.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS
Students will be expected to attend two lectures per week and one discussion section. Two papers will be required, along with a take-home, essay-based midterm and final exam.

TEXTBOOKS
Moral Philosophy: A Reader, edited by Louis Pojman and Peter Tramel, 4th edition Hackett, 2009). ISBN-13: 978-0-87220-962-6.

A Rulebook for Arguments, Anthony Weston, 4th edition (Hackett, 2008). ISBN-13: 978-0-87220-954-1

Lectures on Ethics, Immanuel Kant, trans. Louis Infield (Hackett, 1963). ISBN 0-915144-26-3.

Section 12
Murphy, Mark.

A lot of people think that the correct response to questions about what is morally right or morally wrong is a sort of skepticism: either there is no such thing as moral rightness and wrongness or, at the very least, we cannot have any confidence in any of our answers to these questions. There is somewhat less skepticism, though, about the idea of what people have good reason to do. In this course, we are going to think together about the various factors that are relevant to whether one has good reason to do something. We will then consider how reflection on these questions about good reasons is relevant to thinking clearly about morality. There is no textbook; all readings will be placed on reserve. Four short papers, two exams, and prepared and active attendance are required.

Section 13
Withy, Katherine

In this course, we will (i) explore the philosophical bases of contemporary moral intuitions and (ii) work collaboratively to develop the skills of philosophical writing and argument. By reading classic primary texts, we will explore the history of Western ethical thought in Aristotle (virtue ethics), Kant (deontology), Mill (utilitarianism), and Nietzsche (nihilism). We will end by taking a critical look at the modern ideal of being authentic, and our contemporary condition generally (Charles Taylor, Charles Guignon, Albert Borgmann). Students will learn to read difficult texts closely and to analyse the logical structure of arguments and concepts. We will also spend significant class time discussing and practising effective writing at the sentence-, paragraph- and paper-levels. In addition to a final 1500-word paper, students will submit weekly assignments demonstrating particular writing skills, and will peer-review one another’s work to consolidate those skills. All readings will be available on the course site, but a course packet can also be purchased from the bookstore.

Section 14
Lichtenberg, Judith

One aim of the course is to ask, and try to answer, some basic ethical questions. Are people fundamentally self-interested? Why should a person act morally? Does morality require a religious foundation? (Or, as Dostoevsky put it, is everything permitted if God is dead?) Is there a universal morality that applies across cultures?
To get a better understanding of these issues we will read some of the great philosophers, including Plato, Aristotle, Immanuel Kant, and John Stuart Mill—who articulated theories and ideas that continue to inform thinking about ethics today—as well as some work of contemporary philosophers.
Utilizing these writings, we will also investigate some contemporary moral problems facing individuals as well as societies. Possible topics include punishment and the criminal justice system; abortion; the moral status of nonhuman animals; poverty and inequality.
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Intro to Ethics PHIL-010-130

Credits: 3
Cross Session
Distance
Day and Time

This course meets entirely online.

An Introduction to Ethics is taught in the FALL, SPRING ...

An Introduction to Ethics is taught in the FALL, SPRING, and SUMMER semesters. Please scroll down page to view individual section course descriptions:



FALL 2014

Sections 1 - 11
Stohr, Karen

COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course is an introduction to the study of philosophical ethics, understood as both a subject for theoretical reflection and a practical guide for how to live. We will explore the views of the West’s greatest ethical thinkers, both past and present, and we will use narratives from literature and film to illuminate the ethical issues they raise. The course begins with an exploration of the moral self, including conceptions of happiness, virtue, character, integrity, moral responsibility, and friendship. We will move from there to a discussion of ethical issues that arise out of interactions with others here at Georgetown, focusing on respect and self-respect. We will use philosophical readings to help us think reflectively about competition, academic honesty, alcohol use, and sexual relationships. Finally, we will broaden our outlook to more global ethical issues, with an emphasis on our role as agents capable of affecting the future of the planet. We will discuss the effects of our actions on impoverished people around the globe, animals, and the environment. We’ll conclude with a discussion of justice and the conduct of war. Please note that this course will be part of the Engelhard Project.

COURSE GOALS
o Students will appreciate the importance of theoretical ethical reflection in the effective resolution of practical ethical problems.
o Students will acquire the tools needed to locate and articulate the important points of disagreement between people on opposing sides of controversial issues.
o Students will cultivate the skill of critically evaluating ethical views and arguments.
o Students will learn how to construct philosophically sound ethical arguments of their own.
o Students will improve their ability to engage in respectful discussion of divisive moral issues
o Students will gain new insights into ethical problems arising in their daily lives.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS
Students will be expected to attend two lectures per week and one discussion section. Two papers will be required, along with a take-home, essay-based midterm and final exam.

TEXTBOOKS
Moral Philosophy: A Reader, edited by Louis Pojman and Peter Tramel, 4th edition Hackett, 2009). ISBN-13: 978-0-87220-962-6.

A Rulebook for Arguments, Anthony Weston, 4th edition (Hackett, 2008). ISBN-13: 978-0-87220-954-1

Lectures on Ethics, Immanuel Kant, trans. Louis Infield (Hackett, 1963). ISBN 0-915144-26-3.

Section 12
Murphy, Mark.

A lot of people think that the correct response to questions about what is morally right or morally wrong is a sort of skepticism: either there is no such thing as moral rightness and wrongness or, at the very least, we cannot have any confidence in any of our answers to these questions. There is somewhat less skepticism, though, about the idea of what people have good reason to do. In this course, we are going to think together about the various factors that are relevant to whether one has good reason to do something. We will then consider how reflection on these questions about good reasons is relevant to thinking clearly about morality. There is no textbook; all readings will be placed on reserve. Four short papers, two exams, and prepared and active attendance are required.

Section 13
Withy, Katherine

In this course, we will (i) explore the philosophical bases of contemporary moral intuitions and (ii) work collaboratively to develop the skills of philosophical writing and argument. By reading classic primary texts, we will explore the history of Western ethical thought in Aristotle (virtue ethics), Kant (deontology), Mill (utilitarianism), and Nietzsche (nihilism). We will end by taking a critical look at the modern ideal of being authentic, and our contemporary condition generally (Charles Taylor, Charles Guignon, Albert Borgmann). Students will learn to read difficult texts closely and to analyse the logical structure of arguments and concepts. We will also spend significant class time discussing and practising effective writing at the sentence-, paragraph- and paper-levels. In addition to a final 1500-word paper, students will submit weekly assignments demonstrating particular writing skills, and will peer-review one another’s work to consolidate those skills. All readings will be available on the course site, but a course packet can also be purchased from the bookstore.

Section 14
Lichtenberg, Judith

One aim of the course is to ask, and try to answer, some basic ethical questions. Are people fundamentally self-interested? Why should a person act morally? Does morality require a religious foundation? (Or, as Dostoevsky put it, is everything permitted if God is dead?) Is there a universal morality that applies across cultures?
To get a better understanding of these issues we will read some of the great philosophers, including Plato, Aristotle, Immanuel Kant, and John Stuart Mill—who articulated theories and ideas that continue to inform thinking about ethics today—as well as some work of contemporary philosophers.
Utilizing these writings, we will also investigate some contemporary moral problems facing individuals as well as societies. Possible topics include punishment and the criminal justice system; abortion; the moral status of nonhuman animals; poverty and inequality.
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Intro to Philosophy PHIL-020-20

Credits: 3
2nd Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Tue 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Wed 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Thu 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM



Fall 2014

Sections 1-11
Lewis, Neil

We believe all sorts ...



Fall 2014

Sections 1-11
Lewis, Neil

We believe all sorts of things about ourselves and about the world around us. Some of our important and fundamental beliefs we may have adopted after some thought, but many we just seem to have and have never taken the time to think carefully about. But a reflective person might start wondering whether in fact there are good reasons for these beliefs or whether some alternative beliefs might instead be true. We start to do philosophy when we start to wonder about such things -- we start to live what Socrates called an “examined life.”

For a long time people held beliefs along the following lines. There is a physical world and it is pretty much the way it seems to us in sense perception, but we are not fully of that world; we are, at least in part, or perhaps fully, non-physical beings. And unlike other living things, we have free will, a special kind of autonomy crucial for morality. And, despite the evil in it, the world, in both its physical and spiritual dimensions, is created and governed by a good God, who has a special interest in our well being and with whom we will finally reach human fulfillment, if all goes well, in an afterlife. The scientific revolution of the seventeenth century (and later, the theory of evolution) shook confidence in such beliefs. It suggested that the physical world is not as it seems, that we are purely physical beings without free will, as subject to the laws governing matter as is everything else, and that the world has no room for God to play a role. A critical examination of our beliefs was called for. Descartes’s Meditations, a seminal work of philosophy written in the seventeenth century, sought to maintain confidence in the old beliefs by arguing that their truth is required for the new science to be properly founded.

The Meditations makes a great entry point for the study of philosophy, and in this course we will use this work to begin our exploration of the issues noted above, considering not just Descartes’s views but also the further development of these issues in historical and contemporary thinkers.

Section 12
Lu-Adler, Huaping

This course revolves around determinism, freedom (of the will), and responsibility. We read both classical and contemporary literature on specific issues such as (a) weakness of the will, (b) (how the question about free will arises in addressing) the problem of evil, (c) whether freedom and determinism are compatible and what implication this may have for thinking about (d) moral responsibility, and (e) procrastination. Regular, active, informed participation in various forms of philosophical discussions are required and count toward your final grade (20%). There are three term papers (25%, 25%, 30%).

Section 13
Ver Eecke, Wilfried

In the first part of the course (Ch 1) we will study the characteristics of philosophy and its different fields. This will allow us to present some of the crucial philosophical theories in epistemology, ethics and metaphysics. In a second part (Ch 2-4) we will reflect philosophically on the relation of a human being to other human beings.

In a first chapter, we will analyze the characteristics of philosophy. We will pay special attention to multi-culturalism as a threat to philosophy in as much as it may lead to skepticism about truth. We will use a book by Jaspers and two videos to provide a summary view of six major civilizations. After discussing the different fields of philosophy and some of the main representatives in each field, we will read Plato as an example of philosophical thinking. We will compare Socrates’ view of love with that of a 20th century feminist and some 20th century French thinkers/philosophers

In a second chapter we will study the interdependence of single human beings by means of a classic passage in Hegel's philosophy: the master-slave dialectic. We will use Frederick Douglass’ Memoirs as an illustration of Hegel’s ideas. We will discover the paradoxical consequences of dominance/submission and of idealization. We will see arguments for the positive function of work and thinking. Finally, we will discuss Hegel’s dialectical method as a central part of his system and Marx’s criticism.

In chapter three we will study the relation of one human being with privileged others. Here we will use philosophy of psychoanalysis which was a crucial topic in 20th century French philosophy. We will begin by introducing the idea of the unconscious as it is at work in jokes, slips of the tongue, denials. Then we will study the function of privileged others (parents) in the becoming of the human subject. In the process we will clarify the understanding of mental illness (schizophrenia) and the role of sexual difference (i.e., idea of finitude).

Section 14
Mulherin, Thomas

“We remain of necessity strangers to ourselves, we do not understand ourselves, we must mistake ourselves, for us the maxim reads to all eternity: ‘each is furthest from himself,”—with respect to ourselves we are not ‘knowers’...”—Nietzsche, On the Genealogy of Morality

Many philosophers have noted that there is often a gap between how we conceive of ourselves and the way we really are. Not only do we frequently act in ways that are in tension with our own beliefs about how we ought to act (weakness of will), but we also often deny responsibility for actions that were, in fact, freely chosen (bad faith). Interests and desires that we claim as our own turn out, on further analysis, to be rooted in our social context and, indeed, to conflict with our actual interests and desires (false consciousness). Finally, laudable human achievements, such as art, can be often explained as reorientations of darker impulses that we may well wish to repudiate (sublimation).

This course introduces philosophy through reflection on these and other related phenomena. Although the relevant discussions are often ethically charged (a fact that we will not ignore), this is not a course in ethics: our main interest will be in the coherence of the phenomena and the theories they presuppose, as well as the arguments advanced for or against their reality. While the texts we read will be primarily historical and European—our authors will include Plato, Jean-Paul Sartre, Simone de Beauvoir, Sigmund Freud, Karl Marx, and Friedrich Nietzsche, among others—these core texts will be supplemented by readings drawn from contemporary analytic philosophy. Students will be assessed on the basis of 6 brief, cumulative writing assignments (5 short exercises of no more than 2 pages and one 3-4 page essay), an in-class final examination, and weekly reading quizzes.
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Philosophy of Sport PHIL-098-10

Credits: 3
1st Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Tue 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Wed 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Thu 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM

Phil. 98 is an introduction to the discipline of philosophy ...

Phil. 98 is an introduction to the discipline of philosophy by way of questions that arise in the context of sports. That is, we will work our way towards philosophical issues by working through more practical debates that arise in the context of sports.

For example, what (if anything) is wrong with using performance-enhancing drugs (PED’s)? Is it cheating? What is it to cheat? And what’s wrong with cheating anyhow? Are PED’s dangerous? Many sports are dangerous, some can even be life-threatening. So, what’s wrong with something’s being dangerous? And even if PED’s are dangerous, does that give anyone aside from the athlete him- or herself the right to stop the athlete from using them? Are PED’s unnatural? What does “natural” mean in the context of human life? Lots of things we do are “unnatural” in some sense. Both cosmetic surgery and hi-tech sports equipment are “unnatural” in some sense. Should they be banned?

Another example: what’s the difference between an amateur and a professional, and why does this distinction matter? Do amateurs play for “love of the game,” while professionals earn money? Can’t someone who earns money, even lots of money, playing a professional sport also or even primarily play for love of the game? Should collegiate athletes be paid? Are big time collegiate athletes exploited by their institutions, by the television networks, by their fans, by the viewing public? Do the pressures of professional or collegiate athletics place an alienating barrier between the athlete and his or her sport? Between the athlete and his or her education?

We all debate questions like these, and when we do we often hit barriers to our understanding. Those barriers are philosophical: What are the ethics of competition and games? May anyone dictate to an adult what he or she does to or with his or her own body? What is the distinction between the natural and the artificial? What is exploitation? What is alienation? These are all philosophical questions, and we will examine them through a range of literature, including contemporary contributions to the growing discussion of the philosophy sport and classical writings by the great philosophers of the past.
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Ethics: Bioethics PHIL-105-30

Credits: 3
Cross Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 6:00 PM - 8:30 PM
  • Wed 6:00 PM - 8:30 PM

This course will be held at the downtown campus, located at 640 Massachusetts Avenue, NW.

Ethics: Bioethics is taught in the FALL, SPRING, and SUMMER ...

Ethics: Bioethics is taught in the FALL, SPRING, and SUMMER semesters. Please scroll down page to view individual section course descriptions:



FALL 2014

Section 1

Section 2
Guidry-Grimes, Laura

Is it morally acceptable to subject children to clinical research when they will not directly benefit? How should someone make medical decisions for someone who has never been competent? Does physician-assisted suicide violate professional boundaries for the virtuous physician? These questions and many more crop up in the vast field known as bioethics. With the parade of technological advancement, we are faced with a mounting number of difficult decisions and complex moral problems. In this course, we will examine key moral responsibilities of actors within the healthcare system and research fields. Through a combination of ethical theory and case studies, students will learn how to pick out morally salient facts, identify moral stakeholders, weigh conflicting interests, and recognize the moral residue that often accompanies resolutions. Our topics will include foundations in bioethics, clinical research, reproduction, surrogate decision-making, end of life, and allocation of scarce resources. We will read the works of bioethicists such as Tom Beauchamp and James Childress, Peter Singer, Margaret Little, Anita Ho, and Adrienne Asch. All readings will be provided electronically. Students will need to complete two short papers, one debate contribution, and one case analysis. The course website, which will be updated regularly, is here: http://ethics-bioethics.weebly.com

Section 3
Earl, Jacob

This course will introduce students to a selection of current debates in bioethics, including those surrounding artificial reproductive technology, abortion, health care resource allocation, disability accommodation, end-of-life care, physician-assisted suicide, and clinical research in domestic and international contexts. We will examine these issues primarily from the perspective of philosophical ethics, taking care to distinguish and apply the mainstream theories of virtue ethics, deontology, utilitarianism, and the natural law tradition. Students in this course will (a) learn about some of the central issues in contemporary bioethics, including philosophical arguments developed in response to these issues, (b) learn how to think and write clearly about bioethical problems and concepts, and (c) learn how to engage in civil, productive discussion on controversial and difficult issues of great practical import. The textbook for this course is Medical Ethics: Accounts of Ground-Breaking Cases, Sixth Edition, by Gregory E. Pence; additional readings by contemporary bioethicists on specific topics will be posted to Blackboard. Students will be graded on participation (since class meetings will be discussion-driven), four short papers (4-6 pages, on average), one group project, and a final exam.

Sections 4

Phil. 105:04, Introduction to Bioethics
Fall 2014

Instructor, Margaret Little
201 Healy Hall
Wed., 1-4 pm

This course will introduce students to the world of bioethics in an innovative, studio-based forum. Co-taught by Maggie Little, Director of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics, and Arjun Dhillon, Head of Design of EthicsLab, the course will teach students through a combination of traditional philosophical approaches and new design-based thinking, and will incorporate work with two Scholars in Residence, one from the Genographic Project at National Geographic and one from a clinical research project in women’s health.

Topics covered will include Clinical Bioethics, Research Ethics, & Genomics.
The class will be studio-based. Taught in EthicsLab, a new innovation lab in Healy Hall, the class will meet 3 hours weekly as a group; students will also be expected to do homework ahead of class and to attend at least two Open Studio Hours per week. Assignments will include traditional analytic writing, video annotation, and collaborative team projects. No background in design methods required or assumed.

Prerequisite: prior enrollment in Introduction to Philosophy or Introduction to Ethics.



SPRING 2015

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Bioethics: Sex & Sexuality PHIL-107-01

Credits: 3
Presession
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Tue 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Wed 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Thu 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Fri 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM

Utilitarianism, the view that our moral duty is to make ...

Utilitarianism, the view that our moral duty is to make the world better, is the most well-developed and carefully examined of all ethical theories. In the first half of the semester, we will examine various formulations of the theory and various objections to it. In the second half of the course we will consider alternative theories of moral duty. Readings will include classical philosophical texts as well as more contemporary writings. One goal is to see and appreciate how philosophers have thought about problems of identifying what is right and wrong, good and bad, virtuous and vicious. A second, equally important, is to get students thinking about these problems for themselves. The course emphasizes ethical theory, rather than its application to controversial aspects of contemporary life.

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Ethics: Just War Theory PHIL-113-20

Credits: 3
2nd Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 8:30 AM - 10:30 AM
  • Tue 8:30 AM - 10:30 AM
  • Wed 8:30 AM - 10:30 AM
  • Thu 8:30 AM - 10:30 AM

When is it right for a nation to go to ...

When is it right for a nation to go to war? Once at war, what sort of behavior becomes permissible for soldiers and commanders? And what obligations do soldiers, sovereigns and states have in the aftermath of wars? Throughout the semester, we will tackle these questions (and many tangential and subsidiary ones) through the lens of contemporary just wary theory.

We'll begin with a brief unit situating the just war tradition among other historically prominent perspectives on war—realism, pacifism, militarism and crusadism. We will subsequently turn our attention to issues of jus ad bellum, or moral issues surrounding the initiation of war. Subtopics will include aggression, preemptions, preventive wars, interventions, secessions, reprisals. We shall then turn our focus to conduct within war (jus in bello), and take a close look at the Doctrine of Double Effect, noncombatant immunity, the moral responsibility of soldiers fighting unjust wars, and conditions of "supreme emergency". Finally, we’ll discuss a recently popular movement in just war theory that focus on justice in the conclusion of war (jus post bellum).

While our readings will come primarily from contemporary western just war theory, we will also examine the historical roots of the western just war tradition, as well as the ethics of war in other cultures. In our final unit, we will briefly explore the Islamic, Jewish and Chinese traditions of just war.

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Ethics:Applied Ethics PHIL-116-20

Credits: 3
2nd Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Tue 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Wed 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Thu 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM

Moral issues pervade our lives: As friends, as daughters and ...

Moral issues pervade our lives: As friends, as daughters and sons, as students, as consumers, as citizens (for example), we are faced with question about how to treat others properly and how to live a meaningful and fulfilling life. But fundamental doubts about morality are often just as pervasive: How can there be objective moral truths if people disagree so deeply and pervasively about moral issues? Are there objective moral requirements, or is morality a matter of mere preference? Do moral norms apply universally, or are they relative to cultures? How do moral values fit in our scientific picture of the world? How could we ever come to know universal and objective norms? Can we live a good life if we are constrained by moral norms?

This course will introduce you to the philosophical study of morality by way of discussing and addressing major skeptical challenges to morality. The course aims to enable you to engage in moral debate in a serious, critical, and self-reflective way.

In the first part of the course, we will explore and analyze skeptical challenges to morality carefully, and consider general responses to skeptical arguments. In this context, we will discuss what would be required for the justification of moral claims and the rational solution of moral conflict. In the second part, we are going to explore important moral theories, analyzing how they try to meet skeptical challenges and how they help us navigate moral issues in our lives. In the last part of the course we are going discuss what a civil and peaceful engagement with moral disagreement and moral conflict in modern societies should look like.
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Ethics: Global Justice PHIL-129-10

Credits: 3
1st Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Tue 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Wed 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Thu 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM

Sections 1&2

Whether discussing the Arab Spring, the rise ...

Sections 1&2

Whether discussing the Arab Spring, the rise of China, the Euro crisis, or global climate change, issues of poverty, inequality, and humanitarian aid are at the forefront today. Hand in hand with the questions of policy are the ethical questions concerning global justice: What is justice in a globally interconnected world? How ought we as individuals, societies, and governments to respond to 1.5 billion people living in absolute poverty? Do we have different moral duties toward our neighbors or fellow citizens than we do toward foreigners? Is global inequality—whether defined in terms of income, capability, or health—a matter of justice? What is the role of human rights in securing global justice? Are our current institutions sufficient to address global challenges such as environmental degradation, health care, and immigration?

In this course we will examine these and other questions as we read, discuss, and write on contemporary moral philosophers focused on global justice.
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Ethics:Morality & Conscience PHIL-131-10

Credits: 3
1st Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Tue 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Wed 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Thu 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM

Do we have a moral duty to obey the government ...

Do we have a moral duty to obey the government? Sometimes the answer is an obvious “Yes.” The law prohibits murder; we are morally obliged to refrain from murder. But in this case, we must obey because the law instructs us to do what morality already requires––murder is independently wrong, no matter what the government says about it. So can the government make something that’s otherwise unproblematic (like skateboarding) wrong by forbidding it? To put the question more generally: Does a reasonably just government’s say-so always carry moral weight?

This practical question—whether the government’s say-so carries moral weight—will serve as our entry point for philosophical theorizing. In an attempt to answer it, we’ll have to consider a wide range of political and moral theories. By way of quick preview, we’ll study the nature of genuine authority, the nature of government and law, and look at what kinds of moral theories our most promising defenses of political authority presuppose. Readings will include selections from Aristotle, Locke, Kant, Rawls, Mill, and others.

‘Schedule’ of Topics:
We’ll start by spending a week (or so) distinguishing coercive force, de facto authority (coercive force that citizens believe is legitimate), and de jure authority (the real, full-blooded, normatively potent item).

With these distinctions in hand, we’ll turn to a few arguments against the existence of political authority. We’ll read Robert Paul Wolff’s famous argument, and whatever else catches my eye as appropriate for undergrads. The aim here is to problematize political authority; I suspect that most students will take its legitimacy for granted.

We’ll then examine a series of defenses of political authority. Since consent theory is so prominent in American thought, we’ll probably begin with it. Locke is a good figure to read here. The problems with consent theory will be obvious: Most of us have never consented; tacit consent is a sham. The failure of consent theory will inspire a move to Rawlsian hypothetical consent theory. I don’t have a definite order in mind for the remaining defenses of political authority. But we’ll look at theories that invoke a natural duty of fair play, natural law theories (possibly along with other theories that try to derive political authority from (alleged) divine authority), and instrumental theories.

If all goes to plan, the students will at this point understand what real authority is, recognize that it requires a justification, and see that our best attempts to justify it are not obviously successful—though, of course, they will be encouraged to rehabilitate them in their papers!

Next, we’ll shift gears and to bring issues that have been in the background to the foreground. The idea is to motivate foundational philosophical issues by grappling with the practical problem of political authority. These background issues include the nature of government and law (Are these institutions the sort of things that can be authoritative?); what kind of moral theory can accommodate true authority (Arguably not, for example, Utilitarianism.). We’ll conclude with a week dedicated to thinking about what it would mean––practically speaking––if anarchism is true.

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Existentialism PHIL-159-10

Credits: 3
1st Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Tue 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Wed 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Thu 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM

Many of the philosophers we'll discuss under the label ...

Many of the philosophers we'll discuss under the label 'existentialism' either predated the term or rejected it outright. Nonetheless, we can think of existentialism as a trajectory of modern thought driven by a set of roughly overlapping concerns – e.g. human freedom and its basic threats in modernization; the place of rationality in human life; meaning; commitment; anxiety; the absurd; authenticity. We will start the semester by exploring the historical situation that gave birth to existentialism in order to get a feel for what existentialists are responding to. We will then explore the philosophical responses to this historical situation offered by Friedrich Nietzsche, Albert Camus, Jean-Paul Sartre, and Martin Heidegger. Students will be assessed based on participation in class discussion, two short (3 page) papers, and a two or three quizzes.
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Mind and Meaning PHIL-182-10

Credits: 3
1st Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 8:30 AM - 10:30 AM
  • Tue 8:30 AM - 10:30 AM
  • Wed 8:30 AM - 10:30 AM
  • Thu 8:30 AM - 10:30 AM

Here is a seemingly obvious truth: linguistic entities, like words ...

Here is a seemingly obvious truth: linguistic entities, like words and sentences, have meanings. What is not obvious is what it means to say linguistic entities have meanings. To many, it seems plausible that the meaning of a term has something to do with the psychology of the person using the term. In a famous paper entitled "The meaning of 'meaning'" Hilary Putnam takes up this question and comes to a startling conclusion: "meanings just ain’t in the head." That is, meanings are not determined by the speaker’s psychological state. They are, rather, determined by factors that are external to the speaker. This position has come to be called externalism. The view that meanings are determined by the psychological (or otherwise internal) properties of the speaker is called internalism. In this class, we will be investigating the dispute between internalists and externalists.

The course will begin with a historical overview, where we will look at the important developments in the philosophy of language leading up to the introduction of semantic externalism. In the second portion of the course, we will investigate the thesis of semantic externalism in depth. Finally, we will look at some of the consequences of semantic externalism and consider some criticisms of the view.

Students will be expected to complete two take-home tests and two papers, as well as contribute to in-class discussions. Some background in logic or philosophy of language will be helpful but is not required.
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Consciousness PHIL-190-20

Credits: 3
2nd Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Tue 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Wed 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Thu 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM

The course will focus on a close reading and active ...

The course will focus on a close reading and active discussion of Plato's REPUBLIC & LAWS, & Aristotle's POLITICS. Course requirements include: (1) a number of short essays; (2) group presentations; (3) active class participation.
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Clear & Critical Thinking PHIL-195-20

Credits: 3
2nd Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Tue 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Wed 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Thu 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM

SUMMER 2011

What should we believe? One answer is that ...

SUMMER 2011

What should we believe? One answer is that we should believe what we have reason to believe. Which reasons are good and which are bad? This will be the central question of this course. We will examine strategies for offering reasons, and the myriad ways they can go wrong. We will then turn to an examination of classic and contemporary debates in philosophy, purporting as they do to give us reason to believe certain propositions relating to the existence and character of God, the nature of our personal identity over time, the existence and knowability of an external world, and the nature of the mind. After this, we will turn to debates that arise in popular media today: we are offered reasons every day in the newspaper and on TV. We will examine the structure and character of these exchanges and see what kind of reasons they give us to believe their conclusions. Each student will be responsible for presenting on two pieces, one historical/philosophical and one contemporary/popular, with a final paper consisting in a written and extended version of one of these presentations.
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Basic Physics PHYS-007-20

Credits: 3
2nd Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
  • Tue 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
  • Wed 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
  • Thu 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
  • Fri 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM

Principles of Physics I PHYS-101-10

Credits: 3
1st Summer Session
Recitation
Day and Time
  • Tue 10:15 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Thu 10:15 AM - 11:45 AM
 
Lecture
  • Mon 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM
  • Tue 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM
  • Wed 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM
  • Thu 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM
  • Fri 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM

This is the lecture and recitation only. The lab section must be registered for separately.

PHYS-101 and 102 constitute a year-long comprehensive calculus-based introduction to ...

PHYS-101 and 102 constitute a year-long comprehensive calculus-based introduction to physics, particularly suited to the needs and interests of pre-medical students. Topics covered are Newton's laws, linear, planar, and rotational motions, work, energy, momentum, gravitation, periodic motion and waves, fluid mechanics, acoustics, thermodynamics, electric fields, electric potential, dielectrics, magnetic fields, induction, DC circuits, electromagnetic waves and light, interference and diffraction of light, geometric optics, atomic, quantum, nuclear, and condensed matter physics, and cosmology. Important note: Familiarity with calculus is assumed. Three lecture hours, one recitation hour, and two laboratory hours.
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Principles of Physics I PHYS-101-11

Credits: 3
1st Summer Session
Recitation
Day and Time
  • Mon 10:15 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Wed 10:15 AM - 11:45 AM
 
Lecture
  • Mon 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM
  • Tue 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM
  • Wed 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM
  • Thu 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM
  • Fri 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM

This is the lecture and recitation only. The lab section must be registered for separately.

PHYS-101 and 102 constitute a year-long comprehensive calculus-based introduction to ...

PHYS-101 and 102 constitute a year-long comprehensive calculus-based introduction to physics, particularly suited to the needs and interests of pre-medical students. Topics covered are Newton's laws, linear, planar, and rotational motions, work, energy, momentum, gravitation, periodic motion and waves, fluid mechanics, acoustics, thermodynamics, electric fields, electric potential, dielectrics, magnetic fields, induction, DC circuits, electromagnetic waves and light, interference and diffraction of light, geometric optics, atomic, quantum, nuclear, and condensed matter physics, and cosmology. Important note: Familiarity with calculus is assumed. Three lecture hours, one recitation hour, and two laboratory hours.
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Principles of Physics II PHYS-102-20

Credits: 3
2nd Summer Session
Recitation
Day and Time
  • Tue 10:15 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Thu 10:15 AM - 11:45 AM
 
Lecture
  • Mon 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM
  • Tue 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM
  • Wed 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM
  • Thu 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM
  • Fri 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM

This is the lecture and recitation only. The lab section must be registered for separately.

PHYS-101 and 102 constitute a year-long comprehensive calculus-based introduction to ...

PHYS-101 and 102 constitute a year-long comprehensive calculus-based introduction to physics, particularly suited to the needs and interests of pre-medical students. Topics covered are Newton's laws, linear, planar, and rotational motions, work, energy, momentum, gravitation, periodic motion and waves, fluid mechanics, acoustics, thermodynamics, electric fields, electric potential, dielectrics, magnetic fields, induction, DC circuits, electromagnetic waves and light, interference and diffraction of light, geometric optics, atomic, quantum, nuclear, and condensed matter physics, and cosmology. Important note: Familiarity with calculus is assumed. Three lecture hours, one recitation hour, and two laboratory hours.
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Principles of Physics II PHYS-102-21

Credits: 3
2nd Summer Session
Recitation
Day and Time
  • Mon 10:15 AM - 11:45 AM
  • Wed 10:15 AM - 11:45 AM
 
Lecture
  • Mon 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM
  • Tue 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM
  • Wed 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM
  • Thu 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM
  • Fri 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM

This is the lecture and recitation only. The lab section must be registered for separately.

PHYS-101 and 102 constitute a year-long comprehensive calculus-based introduction to ...

PHYS-101 and 102 constitute a year-long comprehensive calculus-based introduction to physics, particularly suited to the needs and interests of pre-medical students. Topics covered are Newton's laws, linear, planar, and rotational motions, work, energy, momentum, gravitation, periodic motion and waves, fluid mechanics, acoustics, thermodynamics, electric fields, electric potential, dielectrics, magnetic fields, induction, DC circuits, electromagnetic waves and light, interference and diffraction of light, geometric optics, atomic, quantum, nuclear, and condensed matter physics, and cosmology. Important note: Familiarity with calculus is assumed. Three lecture hours, one recitation hour, and two laboratory hours.
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Prin of Physics I Lab PHYS-103-10

Credits: 1
1st Summer Session
Laboratory
Day and Time
  • Mon 10:15 AM - 1:00 PM
  • Wed 10:15 AM - 1:00 PM

Prin of Physics I Lab PHYS-103-11

Credits: 1
1st Summer Session
Laboratory
Day and Time
  • Tue 10:15 AM - 1:00 PM
  • Thu 10:15 AM - 1:00 PM

Prin of Physics Lab II PHYS-104-20

Credits: 1
2nd Summer Session
Laboratory
Day and Time
  • Mon 10:15 AM - 1:00 PM
  • Wed 10:15 AM - 1:00 PM

Prin of Physics Lab II PHYS-104-21

Credits: 1
2nd Summer Session
Laboratory
Day and Time
  • Tue 10:15 AM - 1:00 PM
  • Thu 10:15 AM - 1:00 PM

Public Speaking PSPK-080-10

Credits: 3
1st Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 10:45 AM - 12:15 PM
  • Tue 10:45 AM - 12:15 PM
  • Wed 10:45 AM - 12:15 PM
  • Thu 10:45 AM - 12:15 PM
  • Fri 10:45 AM - 12:15 PM

A performance course designed to introduce basic principles of communication ...

A performance course designed to introduce basic principles of communication and the classical roots from which they were derived. Students will prepare and present speeches in both formal platform settings and informal group discussions. While attention will be given to extemporaneous delivery, the emphasis of the course is on work behind-the-scenes: organizing ideas, structuring messages, and adapting messages for specific audiences. Attention will also be given to methods for evaluating oral discourse. Students who experience anxiety in public speaking situations are encouraged to enroll. Fall and Spring.
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Public Speaking PSPK-080-20

Credits: 3
2nd Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 10:45 AM - 12:15 PM
  • Tue 10:45 AM - 12:15 PM
  • Wed 10:45 AM - 12:15 PM
  • Thu 10:45 AM - 12:15 PM
  • Fri 10:45 AM - 12:15 PM

A performance course designed to introduce basic principles of communication ...

A performance course designed to introduce basic principles of communication and the classical roots from which they were derived. Students will prepare and present speeches in both formal platform settings and informal group discussions. While attention will be given to extemporaneous delivery, the emphasis of the course is on work behind-the-scenes: organizing ideas, structuring messages, and adapting messages for specific audiences. Attention will also be given to methods for evaluating oral discourse. Students who experience anxiety in public speaking situations are encouraged to enroll. Fall and Spring.
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General Psychology PSYC-001-10

Credits: 3
1st Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Tue 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Wed 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Thu 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM

This introductory course surveys the field and acquaints the student ...

This introductory course surveys the field and acquaints the student with the major areas of Psychology, including perception, memory, cognition, neuroscience, learning, motivation, emotion, personality, social behavior, development, and psychopathology.

PSYC-001. GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY IS A PREREQUISITE FOR ALL OTHER PSYCHOLOGY COURSES.
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General Psychology PSYC-001-21

Credits: 3
2nd Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Tue 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Wed 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Thu 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM

This introductory course surveys the field and acquaints the student ...

This introductory course surveys the field and acquaints the student with the major areas of Psychology, including perception, memory, cognition, neuroscience, learning, motivation, emotion, personality, social behavior, development, and psychopathology.

PSYC-001. GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY IS A PREREQUISITE FOR ALL OTHER PSYCHOLOGY COURSES.
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Social Psychology PSYC-140-20

Credits: 3
2nd Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Tue 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Wed 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Thu 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM

This course examines the social foundations of human nature by ...

This course examines the social foundations of human nature by addressing the following aspects of social life: (a) social influence; (b) social roles and public behavior; (c) inferences about other people; and (d) interpersonal relations and groups. Among the topics to be considered are: the social origins of knowledge and of self, the influence of public behavior on social and moral norms, persuasion, impression management, social emotions, judgment of responsibility and character, interpersonal attraction, aggression, altruism, group dynamics, and inter-group conflict. The course will concentrate on the level of analysis of the individual, but will include sociological and evolutionary perspectives where appropriate.
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History of Modern Psychology PSYC-216-01

Credits: 3
Presession
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 1:00 PM - 3:30 PM
  • Tue 1:00 PM - 3:30 PM
  • Wed 1:00 PM - 3:30 PM
  • Thu 1:00 PM - 3:30 PM

This course begins with a consideration of the proximate intellectual ...

This course begins with a consideration of the proximate intellectual roots of scientific psychology, extending from the Renaissance into the latter part of the 19th century. Following the discipline's formal founding (to the extent that there can be such a thing) in Leipzig in 1879, tensions soon arose around alternative conceptions of the discipline's proper subject matter and its most apposite methods of investigation. By concentrating primarily on developments that transpired over the first 6 decades of the 20th century, the lines of psychology's past in its early 21st century "face" can be more readily discerned, and the intended result is an enhanced critical perspective on the discipline's historic achievements, its failures, and its future prospects.
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Introduction to Sociology SOCI-001-20

Credits: 3
2nd Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Tue 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Wed 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Thu 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM

MW 8:00 – 9:15am
WGR 206

The overarching goal ...

MW 8:00 – 9:15am
WGR 206

The overarching goal of this course is that you, the student, might be a more socially aware citizen and use your sociological imagination and understanding to be a part of creating an even better world. The more immediate goal is to develop your sociological imagination by introducing you to the field of sociology.
You will read great textbook, view video clips, engage in discussion with your peers and professor, complete data workshops where you practice being a social analyst, do simulations to illuminate concepts we are studying, and have quizzes and exams to test your mastery of the concepts and vocabulary. By the end of the semester you will know and be able to explain basic concepts, generalizations, theories, and methods used in the study of sociology; the sociological focus and the influence the study of sociology has on identifying, explaining, and solving (or causing) social policy issues; and how sociology is used in everyday life to explain the social behavior of people, and even predict what they will do.
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Social Problems SOCI-022-20

Credits: 3
2nd Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 8:30 AM - 10:30 AM
  • Tue 8:30 AM - 10:30 AM
  • Wed 8:30 AM - 10:30 AM
  • Thu 8:30 AM - 10:30 AM

Social Problems will address the inefficiencies in our modern societies ...

Social Problems will address the inefficiencies in our modern societies to address the massive changes taking place in inequality, social organization and globalization. The class will address the creation of the virtual society and its impact on social organization, the role of the corporation and its impact on structures of inequality, and the institutions of a nation state diminishing in significance but humanity at the cusp of planning and organization from the citizen’s perspective. In addition, we will engage in research and analysis of traditional social problems and cases.
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Social Movements SOCI-155-20

Credits: 3
2nd Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Tue 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Wed 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Thu 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM

This course will examine social movements as planned and fairly ...

This course will examine social movements as planned and fairly prolonged mass attempts against the established socio-political systems. They are organized efforts to promote social change, at least in part, through non-institutionalized forms of political action. The major goals of the course are: 1) to acquaint students with major concepts, theories, and paradigms on social movements. Some of the major theories include strain, Marxist, resource mobilization, political process, and “cultural” explanations; 2) to examine significant sociological variables of class, gender, race/ethnicity, age, ideology, and religion within social movements; 3) to analyze the formation process and impact of a number of post-World War II era movements in the U.S., such as the Civil Rights, Women’s Liberation, Student and the New Left, the Christian Right, and more recently sporadic “anti-globalization” movement; 4) in addition, some cases in the developing world will be examined to familiarize students with various sociopolitical contexts (and their impact on movement formation). In particular, we look at movements of national liberation, Islamic revivalism in some Middle Eastern countries and the emerging pro-democracy movements.
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Gender Roles SOCI-161-10

Credits: 3
1st Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Tue 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Wed 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Thu 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM

TR 11:00am - 12:15pm
WAL 390

Gender Roles is ...

TR 11:00am - 12:15pm
WAL 390

Gender Roles is an introduction to the sociological study of gender. Sociologists of Gender argue that gender is a major organizing principle of everyday life. We will be investigating the social construction and maintenance of gendered – and transgendered – identities in a gender-stratified society. The topics we will examine include: cultural definitions and expectations regarding gender identity and roles; childhood socialization; intimacies and sexualities; gender inequalities in relationships, including marriage and families of choice; inequities in work and the economy; religion; power and politics; and social reforms and possibilities for all individuals. Variations based on race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic class are considered throughout the course. The focus is primarily on contemporary American society, although global issues will also be explored.
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Intensive Basic Spanish SPAN-011-10

Credits: 6
1st Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 9:30 AM - 12:30 PM
  • Tue 9:30 AM - 12:30 PM
  • Wed 9:30 AM - 12:30 PM
  • Thu 9:30 AM - 12:30 PM
  • Fri 9:30 AM - 12:30 PM

Please contact the Summer and Special Programs Office at (202) 687-8700 for more information.

Along with Intensive Intermediate Spanish, this course was originally developed ...

Along with Intensive Intermediate Spanish, this course was originally developed for FLL students and therefore assumes a certain level of motivation to learn languages. The course aims to develop students' ability to communicate in Spanish and to help them acquire the skills necessary to understand oral and written texts. Different aspects of Hispanic culture will be introduced in reading passages and videos. Grading criteria are based on lexical breadth, grammatical accuracy, reading and listening comprehension skills, and a basic knowledge of Spanish-speaking areas.
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Intermediate Spanish I SPAN-021-10

Credits: 3
1st Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Tue 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Wed 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Thu 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM

Visiting students must take a placement test prior to registering for this course. Please contact the Summer and Special Programs Office at (202) 687-8700 for more information.

In this intermediate course, students will reinforce their knowledge of ...

In this intermediate course, students will reinforce their knowledge of the first year courses and further develop their ability to 1) communicate satisfactorily in Spanish in everyday practical situations that may occur either here in the U.S or abroad, 2) continue acquiring some of the skills necessary for effective reading in Spanish, and 3) write Spanish with a satisfactory level of accuracy. Students will be exposed to aspects of Hispanic culture and literature via movies and written texts. Three key components that will assist students to attain these three goals are vocabulary, language awareness, and practice/participation.
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Intermediate Spanish II SPAN-022-20

Credits: 3
2nd Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Tue 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Wed 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Thu 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM

Visiting students must take a placement test prior to registering for this course. Please contact the Summer and Special Programs Office at (202) 687-8700 for more information.

This course is a continuation of SPAN 021 that further ...

This course is a continuation of SPAN 021 that further develops students’ ability to 1) communicate satisfactorily in Spanish in everyday practical situations that may occur either here in the U.S or abroad, 2) continue acquiring some of the skills necessary for effective reading in Spanish, and 3) write Spanish with a satisfactory level of accuracy. Students will be exposed to aspects of Hispanic culture and literature via movies and written texts. Three key components that will assist students to attain these three goals are vocabulary, language awareness, and practice/participation.
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Intensive Intermediate Spanish SPAN-032-20

Credits: 6
2nd Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 9:30 AM - 12:30 PM
  • Tue 9:30 AM - 12:30 PM
  • Wed 9:30 AM - 12:30 PM
  • Thu 9:30 AM - 12:30 PM
  • Fri 9:30 AM - 12:30 PM

Visiting students must take a placement test prior to registering for this course. Please contact the Summer and Special Programs Office at (202) 687-8700 for more information.

Continuing from Intensive Basic Spanish, and designed for highly motivated ...

Continuing from Intensive Basic Spanish, and designed for highly motivated students who seek daily contact with the language, this course is designed to further develop students' ability to communicate satisfactorily in Spanish in everyday situations and to help them acquire skills necessary for effective speaking and writing in Spanish. Taking readings, documentaries and films as point of departure, the cultural component of the course grows significantly to include current issues encompassing the economy, politics, and culture of the Spanish-speaking areas on both sides of the Atlantic.
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Advanced Spanish I SPAN-103-10

Credits: 3
1st Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Tue 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Wed 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Thu 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM

Visiting students must take a placement test prior to registering for this course. Please contact the Summer and Special Programs Office at (202) 687-8700 for more information.

At this advanced level, students will review and expand the ...

At this advanced level, students will review and expand the basic structures of Spanish with special emphasis on more difficult grammatical aspects, develop more formal vocabulary, and further improve both oral and written skills. Students will broaden their understanding of several aspects of Hispanic culture and literature via movies and written texts. Four key components that will assist students to attain these goals are grammar, vocabulary, language awareness, and practice/participation.
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Advanced Spanish II SPAN-104-20

Credits: 3
2nd Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Tue 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Wed 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Thu 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM

Visiting students must take a placement test prior to registering for this course. Please contact the Summer and Special Programs Office at (202) 687-8700 for more information.

Students will continue to review and expand the basic structures ...

Students will continue to review and expand the basic structures of Spanish with special emphasis on more difficult grammatical aspects not covered in SPAN 103, develop more formal vocabulary, and further improve both oral and written skills. Students will broaden their understanding of several aspects of Hispanic culture and literature via movies and written texts. Four key components that will assist students to attain these goals are grammar, vocabulary, language awareness, and practice/participation.
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Latin Amer Contemp Short Story SPAN-266-10

Credits: 3
1st Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Tue 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Wed 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM
  • Thu 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM

A survey of Spanish American short fiction by male and ...

A survey of Spanish American short fiction by male and female writers from the 1940s through the 2000s. The course focuses on the development of different literary strategies and their relation to specific historical, political, and social contexts. It also explores the dialogue or struggle with a dominant male tradition of writing through which women authors have shaped their particular literary and social concerns. Among writers to be studied are Borges, Cortázar, Donoso, García Márquez; Bryce Echenique, Ferré, Garro, Peri Rossi, and Valenzuela.

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Social Responsibility of Bus STRT-282-10

Credits: 3
1st Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Tue 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Wed 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Thu 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM

This purpose of this course is to enhance your appreciation ...

This purpose of this course is to enhance your appreciation for, and ability to deal with, the ethical and legal problems you will face in your careers as managers. The course is designed to teach you how to deal with the ethical and legal dilemmas that can arise in the business context. Please note the emphasis on the word ‘how.’ This indicates that you will be required to master a method for solving problems rather than simply learn and remember a stock set of answers.

It is important for you to appreciate this distinction. In many of your courses you are required to understand a conceptually complex set of materials and demonstrate your understanding on examinations or in papers. This is not such a course. In this course, your job is to master a skill; specifically, the skill of normative problem-solving. More precisely, you will be required to develop three closely related abilities: 1) the ability to identify and analyze the ethical and legal problems that can confront you in business situations, 2) the ability to derive a solution to these problems, and 3) the ability to communicate the justification for your solution to others.

The above implies that you should not expect to be provided with answers to the problems we will be examining. In fact, we will often close our discussion of a problem without achieving any definitive resolution. The success of this course should not be measured by the number of ethical or legal problems that we resolve during the semester, but by the degree of confidence you feel at its conclusion in your ability to deal with the unexpected and unexamined normative dilemmas that may confront you in your professional life.
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The Problem of God THEO-001-10

Credits: 3
1st Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM
  • Tue 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM
  • Wed 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM
  • Thu 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM
  • Fri 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM

An examination of the religious dimension of human experience and ...

An examination of the religious dimension of human experience and consciousness in relation to a number of problems and challenges: the problem of knowledge; the relation of faith and reason; various historical, social and existential determinants of belief; the challenge of atheism and humanism; the impact of secularization on religion.
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The Problem of God THEO-001-20

Credits: 3
2nd Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Tue 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Wed 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Thu 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM

An examination of the religious dimension of human experience and ...

An examination of the religious dimension of human experience and consciousness in relation to a number of problems and challenges: the problem of knowledge; the relation of faith and reason; various historical, social and existential determinants of belief; the challenge of atheism and humanism; the impact of secularization on religion.
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Intro to Biblical Literature THEO-011-01

Credits: 3
Presession
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Tue 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Wed 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Thu 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Fri 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM

An introductory study of 1) the books of the Bible ...

An introductory study of 1) the books of the Bible, 2) the history of Ancient Israel and first-century Christianity, and 3) the process of formation and transmission of the faith traditions coming to literary expression in the biblical literature.
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Intro to Biblical Literature THEO-011-20

Credits: 3
2nd Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Tue 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Wed 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Thu 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM

An introductory study of 1) the books of the Bible ...

An introductory study of 1) the books of the Bible, 2) the history of Ancient Israel and first-century Christianity, and 3) the process of formation and transmission of the faith traditions coming to literary expression in the biblical literature.
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Story of Buddhism THEO-067-10

Credits: 3
1st Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Tue 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Wed 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Thu 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM

This course is an introduction to some of the major ...

This course is an introduction to some of the major themes in Buddhist thought and practice. Beginning with the early teachings associated with the historical Buddha, the course will go on to consider the development of the tradition in India, China, Japan, and the United States. Readings will consist of primary texts in translation supplemented by secondary literature on the study of Buddhism.
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Christian Perspec War/Peace THEO-074-20

Credits: 3
2nd Summer Session
Lecture
Day and Time
  • Mon 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Tue 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Wed 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM
  • Thu 3:15 PM - 5:15 PM

The course examines Christian perspectives to the issues of war ...

The course examines Christian perspectives to the issues of war and peace. The first part of the course provides an extensive historical outline of Christian attitudes over the past two thousand years about these topics. It does this through an examination of major thinkers within the Christian tradition who wrote about war and peace. It begins with a review of pertinent biblical literature and ends with a critical assessment of materials written during the twentieth century. The final part of the course examines the two major Christian theological responses to war that have emerged from these historical reflections: the just war tradition and pacifism. This part of the course explores the ethical implications of these two major traditions and their responses to contemporary issues ranging from the 1) use of weapons of mass destruction, 2) purpose, limits, and usefulness of humanitarian interventions, 3) persistent threat of genocide, and 4) modern-day terrorism.
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Acting I TPST-120-20

Credits: 3
2nd Summer Session
Studio
Day and Time
  • Mon 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Tue 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Wed 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Thu 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM

Students must attend classes the first week. Course will meet in the Davis Devine Theatre.

A studio class, Acting I is an experiential introduction to ...

A studio class, Acting I is an experiential introduction to the study of acting for the stage with a basis in psychological and physical realism. Emphasis is placed on the critical and creative theories and techniques to cultivate imagination, focus, embodied creativity, self-awareness, vocal range, and script analysis of predominantly modern and contemporary drama. Acting projects include scenes, monologues, and acting exercises. Readings, writing assignments, and performance projects required. Suitable for students with considerable performance experience but without college coursework in acting, and for complete beginners. Must attend first and second class to retain spot. Student may only add after the first class with instructor approval.
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Intro to Sexuality Studies WGST-141-20

Credits: 3
2nd Summer Session
Seminar
Day and Time
  • Mon 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Tue 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Wed 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
  • Thu 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM

This course provides an introduction to the vibrant and interdisciplinary ...

This course provides an introduction to the vibrant and interdisciplinary field of sexuality studies. Sexuality studies examines the social construction of sexual desires, practices, and identities, and investigates the ways in which sexuality is connected to power and inequality. We will begin the course by exploring some key theories and concepts within the field, and situate them alongside the history of LGBTQ activism in the United States and elsewhere. We will then consider how these concepts can be applied to a variety of contemporary issues such as sexual identity and the state, same-sex marriage, representations of sexuality in popular culture and the media, transnational sexualities and sexual identities and consumerism. Throughout the course, we will examine how sexuality intersects with other social categories such as gender, race, class, nationality, age and ability/disability.



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Summer School for Undergraduate and Graduate Students

Thanks for a great summer! 

2015 course information will be available after the New Year.