Georgetown SCS News & Events

Richard III: Uncovering the Last Plantagenet King


03 May 6-8am

Please join us on Friday, May 2 at 6:00 pm for a lecture by Dr. Turi King as she presents her part in the rare discovery of the skeleton of King Richard III. For centuries, archaeologists searched for his remains. It was only in September 2012 that King Richard III’s body was found in the most unlikely of places – a car park in Leicester, UK.

When: Friday, May 2, 2014 @ 6:00 pm
Where: SCS Auditorium, 640 Massachusetts Ave NW

Event agenda:

6:00 - 7:00 pm: Reception, Level 2 Overlook
7:00 - 8:00 pm: Lecture by Dr. Turi King, SCS Auditorium

The Discovery of Richard III

In August 2012, the University of Leicester in collaboration with the Richard III Society and Leicester City Council, began one of the most ambitious archaeological projects ever attempted: no less than a search for the lost grave of King Richard III, the last English king to die in battle. Incredibly, the excavation uncovered not only the friary of Grey Friars but also a battle-scarred skeleton with spinal curvature. On February 4, 2013, the University announced to the world's press that these were the remains of King Richard III. Read about the background to the search, the discovery and identification of the remains - and the implications for our understanding of history at the University of Leicester website

About Dr. Turi King

Dr. King studied Biological Anthropology at Cambridge before moving into the field of molecular genetics, gaining a distinction in her M.Sc. at the University of Leicester. She returned to Cambridge to study for her Ph.D. but left when she found she was pregnant with her first child. Working part-time in genetics in Cambridge, Dr. King jumped at the chance to return to Leicester on a Wellcome Trust Prize Studentship and was awarded her Ph.D. in November 2007. Her thesis was entitled ‘The Relationship Between British Surnames and Y-Chromosomal Haplotypes.’ Dr. King is now lecturer in genetics and archaeology in the University of Leicester’s Department of Genetics and manages the Leverhulme-funded project, The Impact of Diasporas on the Making of Britain, which developed out of the earlier Roots of the British project. She is passionate about communicating science to the public and has appeared in, or advised on, numerous radio and TV programs.

SCS Overlook and Auditorium,<br>SCS Campus,<br>640 Massachusetts Ave, NW

Add to Calendar 2014-05-03 06:00 2014-05-03 08:00 America/New_York Richard III: Uncovering the Last Plantagenet King Please join us on Friday, May 2 at 6:00 pm for a lecture by Dr. Turi King as she presents her part in the rare discovery of the skeleton of King Richard III. For centuries, archaeologists searched for his remains. It was only in September 2012 that King Richard III&rsquo;s body was found in the most unlikely of places &ndash; a car park in Leicester, UK. When: Friday, May 2, 2014 @ 6:00 pm Where: SCS Auditorium,&nbsp;640 Massachusetts Ave NW Event agenda: 6:00 - 7:00 pm: Reception, Level 2 Overlook 7:00 - 8:00 pm: Lecture by Dr. Turi King, SCS Auditorium The Discovery of Richard III In August 2012, the University of Leicester in collaboration with the Richard III Society and Leicester City Council, began one of the most ambitious archaeological projects ever attempted: no less than a search for the lost grave of King Richard III, the last English king to die in battle. Incredibly, the excavation uncovered not only the friary of Grey Friars but also a battle-scarred skeleton with spinal curvature. On February 4, 2013, the University announced to the world's press that these were the remains of King Richard III. Read about the background to the search, the discovery and identification of the remains - and the implications for our understanding of history at the University of Leicester website.&nbsp; About Dr. Turi King Dr. King studied Biological Anthropology at Cambridge before moving into the field of molecular genetics, gaining a distinction in her M.Sc. at the University of Leicester. She returned to Cambridge to study for her Ph.D. but left when she found she was pregnant with her first child. Working part-time in genetics in Cambridge, Dr. King jumped at the chance to return to Leicester on a Wellcome Trust Prize Studentship and was awarded her Ph.D. in November 2007. Her thesis was entitled &lsquo;The Relationship Between British Surnames and Y-Chromosomal Haplotypes.&rsquo; Dr. King is now lecturer in genetics and archaeology in the University of Leicester&rsquo;s Department of Genetics and manages the Leverhulme-funded project, The Impact of Diasporas on the Making of Britain, which developed out of the earlier Roots of the British project. She is passionate about communicating science to the public and has appeared in, or advised on, numerous radio and TV programs. SCS Overlook and Auditorium,<br>SCS Campus,<br>640 Massachusetts Ave, NW MM/DD/YYYY