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GLS Sample Class: Ethical Issues in Contemporary Healthcare


09 Nov 6:30-9:30pm

Please note that the following sample class is reserved for students interested in the Master of Arts in Liberal Studies program. If you are interested in the doctorate program, contact us and we will connect you with a visit opportunity.

Join us to sample a class from our Master of Arts in Liberal Studies program and experience what this degree program has to offer you.

LSHV-521: Ethical Issues in Contemporary Healthcare

Course Description:

Contemporary healthcare engages science and technology in a variety of diagnostic and therapeutic approaches in various disciplines (e.g.- surgery, pathology, rehabilitation, public health, neurology, etc.) to decrease the incidence of acute disease, lessen the prevalence and impact of chronic conditions, extend the lifespan, and in many ways, offer great promise to expand the potential for human performance. Yet, despite these apparent benefits, the technocentric turn in healthcare and medicine has also spawned a number of ethical issues, including debates about autonomy of patients and clinicians, the nature of informed consent, conflicts between motives and duties of beneficence, non-maleficence and socio-political and economic forces, just allocation of medical resources, services and goods, and, more fundamentally, the nature of the “good” in medicine, given the increasing multi-cultural and ethico-legally pluralist environment in which healthcare is afforded. Moreover, we must ask not only those ways in which cutting-edge developments in science and technology can be used to affect human health, and the boundaries of normality, abnormality, wellness and disease, but how should these approaches be employed in this diverse social stage. As well, it is important to address the relative merits, and limitations of various ethical approaches, and to examine the ideal and actual relationship of ethics, policy and laws that guide and govern biomedical research and its translation in practice, when articulating healthcare as a viable public good.

Georgetown Main Campus

37th & O Sts, NW , Intercultural Center 221A
Washington, District of Columbia 20057

Add to Calendar 2015-11-09 18:30 2015-11-09 21:30 America/New_York GLS Sample Class: Ethical Issues in Contemporary Healthcare Please note that the following sample class is reserved for students interested in the Master of Arts in Liberal Studies program. If you are interested in the doctorate program, contact us and we will connect you with a visit opportunity. Join us to sample a class from our Master of Arts in Liberal Studies program and experience what this degree program has to offer you. LSHV-521: Ethical Issues in Contemporary Healthcare Course Description: Contemporary healthcare engages science and technology in a variety of diagnostic and therapeutic approaches in various disciplines (e.g.- surgery, pathology, rehabilitation, public health, neurology, etc.) to decrease the incidence of acute disease, lessen the prevalence and impact of chronic conditions, extend the lifespan, and in many ways, offer great promise to expand the potential for human performance. Yet, despite these apparent benefits, the technocentric turn in healthcare and medicine has also spawned a number of ethical issues, including debates about autonomy of patients and clinicians, the nature of informed consent, conflicts between motives and duties of beneficence, non-maleficence and socio-political and economic forces, just allocation of medical resources, services and goods, and, more fundamentally, the nature of the “good” in medicine, given the increasing multi-cultural and ethico-legally pluralist environment in which healthcare is afforded. Moreover, we must ask not only those ways in which cutting-edge developments in science and technology can be used to affect human health, and the boundaries of normality, abnormality, wellness and disease, but how should these approaches be employed in this diverse social stage. As well, it is important to address the relative merits, and limitations of various ethical approaches, and to examine the ideal and actual relationship of ethics, policy and laws that guide and govern biomedical research and its translation in practice, when articulating healthcare as a viable public good. Georgetown Main Campus , 37th & O Sts, NW , Intercultural Center 221A Washington, District of Columbia, United States 20057 MM/DD/YYYY