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GLS Sample Class: Foundation: Alienation and Self-Identity


11 Nov 6:30-10pm

Please note that the following sample class is reserved for students interested in the Master of Arts in Liberal Studies program. If you are interested in the doctorate program, contact us and we will connect you with a visit opportunity.

Join us to sample a class from our Graduate Liberal Studies programs and experience what this degree program has to offer you.

LSHS-367: Foundation: Alienation and Self-Identity

Course Description:

One of the most perplexing and pervasive problems of our time, the alienation or estrangement of humans from various aspects of their “given” reality, will be examined with attention given to these personal areas: the sense of the hostility of nature, guilt in relation to others, despair over oneself, and the sense of estrangement from some totality or ultimacy of being. The discussion will be pointed toward ways individuals must learn to cope with the various determinants of existence and come to an understanding of who they are. This interaction of "alienation" and "self-identity" will be dealt with in terms of personal, social, and transcendental dimensions.

Georgetown Main Campus

37th & O Sts, NW , Maguire Hall 102
Washington, District of Columbia 20057

Add to Calendar 2015-11-11 18:30 2015-11-11 22:00 America/New_York GLS Sample Class: Foundation: Alienation and Self-Identity Please note that the following sample class is reserved for students interested in the Master of Arts in Liberal Studies program. If you are interested in the doctorate program, contact us and we will connect you with a visit opportunity. Join us to sample a class from our Graduate Liberal Studies programs and experience what this degree program has to offer you. LSHS-367: Foundation: Alienation and Self-Identity Course Description: One of the most perplexing and pervasive problems of our time, the alienation or estrangement of humans from various aspects of their “given” reality, will be examined with attention given to these personal areas: the sense of the hostility of nature, guilt in relation to others, despair over oneself, and the sense of estrangement from some totality or ultimacy of being. The discussion will be pointed toward ways individuals must learn to cope with the various determinants of existence and come to an understanding of who they are. This interaction of "alienation" and "self-identity" will be dealt with in terms of personal, social, and transcendental dimensions. Georgetown Main Campus , 37th & O Sts, NW , Maguire Hall 102 Washington, District of Columbia, United States 20057 MM/DD/YYYY