Course Schedule for Fall 2017


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LSHV-433-01

Art & Culture in 20th C

This course will address major issues and ideas that characterize the revolutionary nature of twentieth century intellectual life within a diverse group of art forms. Methods will be introduced for approaching the study of visual art as cultural history. Seminal works will be examined in the context of historical events as key texts for the interpretation of cultural values.

Note: Graduate Liberal Studies only. Attendance at 1st class strongly advised. Follow Mon/Wed rule; 1st class meeting is Sept. 6th.

  • Course #: LSHV-433-01
  • CRN: 32496
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: North, P.
  • Dates: Aug 30 – Dec 20, 2017
  • Class Meetings:
  • Syllabus: Download

LSHV-480-01

CBL:Jesuit Values:ProfPractice

The mission of the School of Continuing Studies at Georgetown University is to “educate students to become more reflective, active, purposeful citizens who strive to improve themselves and our shared world, embodying Georgetown’s Catholic and Jesuit values and heritage and respecting the principles and traditions of each individual.” What are Jesuit values, why do they matter in your education at SCS, and how do you put them into action in your professional lives? Using the Jesuit pedagogical model of a constant interplay of experience-reflection-action, this course introduces students to the core Jesuit values and engages them by means of lectures, guest speakers, individual reflections, class discussion, and community service experiences outside of the classroom. All students will be responsible for taking on a direct community service activity as part of the class (an average of 1 to 2 hours each week for a total of 20-40 hours over the course of the semester), an experiential learning exercise that will provide data for ongoing individual and group reflections. This course also serves as a gateway to the resources offered at Georgetown for students to explore Jesuit values in greater depth, including opportunities for community-based service, research, and spiritual development. The university’s Office of Mission and Ministry and Center for Social Justice, Research, Teaching & Service (CSJ) are highly involved in the delivery of the class. Open to students in all programs offered at SCS, this course is truly interdisciplinary. Taking seriously the encouragement of recent Jesuit General Congregations to seek greater understanding of religions and cultures by robust engagement with them, students will be continually challenged to approach their own practice areas with new eyes by exploring perspectives from the broad and inclusive professional community at SCS. Students should take away from this course a clear understanding of Georgetown’s Jesuit mission and be able to put into action values inspired by a 450-year-old educational tradition and thereby enhance one’s own professional development. Special note: This class is open to and welcomes students from all faith traditions or no faith tradition.

Note: This three-credit elective is open to students in the MALS and MPS programs. In addition to readings and assignments, students commit to 1-2 hours per week of community service with a community-based organization as part of course requirements. Course is delivered in collaboration with the University's Office of Mission and Ministry and the Center for Social Justice, Research, Teaching & Service.

  • Course #: LSHV-480-01
  • CRN: 31553
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Kralovec, P.
  • Dates: Aug 30 – Dec 20, 2017
  • Class Meetings:

LSHV-990-01

DLS Qualifying Exam

This section of DLS Qualifying Exam Prep is intended for students who have enrolled in the program primarily on a part-time basis (3-6 credits per semester) and who intend to complete their DLS Qualifying Exam at a similar pace. This section counts as Half-Time Status. Notes: DLS students only. 36 hrs completed. Student provides exam checklist to Asst. Dean by Sept. 15th. Course certifies half-time status Repeatable course Fall and Spring terms with DLS Director approval

Note: DLS students only. 36 hrs completed. Student provides exam checklist to Liberal Studies Dean's office by Sept. 30th. Course certifies half time status. Repeatable course Fall and Spring terms with DLS Director's approval

  • Course #: LSHV-990-01
  • CRN: 26239
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Glucklich, A.
  • Dates: Aug 30 – Dec 20, 2017
  • Class Meetings:

LSHV-997-01

DLS Thesis Proposal/Thesis Writing

Note: Register with approval of DLS Director. Course certifies for full-time status 36 hours completed Student provides exam check list to Liberal Studies Dean’s office by Sept. 30th. Repeatable course Fall and Spring terms with DLS Director's approval.

  • Course #: LSHV-997-01
  • CRN: 29996
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Glucklich, A.
  • Dates: Aug 30 – Dec 20, 2017
  • Class Meetings:

LSHV-601-01

DLS Foundational Introductory Colloquium: Liberal Studies as Perspective and Method

This course introduces the student to the history, rationale, and focus of graduate Liberal Studies as a doctoral field. It provides a framework for the entering doctoral student in terms of establishing the foundations and interdisciplinary focus of graduate work in the field. There are three stages to the course. (1) It begins with a broad overview of the pre-modern Western tradition, with guest lectures and readings from the classical to the early modern eras, designed to provide historical context for the emergence of modernity in the Western tradition. (2) In the second part, the emphasis shifts to methodology and research as a way of preparing the entering doctoral student for graduate Liberal Studies at Georgetown University. Readings and additional guest lectures help the student develop a fuller sense of how particular disciplines function within the context of interdisciplinary analysis. (3) The final section of the course involves an in-class workshop on research methods and then a final set of round table student presentations on their research topics for the term paper. The research topic will be chosen, in consultation with the professor, so the student can explore some aspect of his/her stated area of interest for the D.L.S

Note: DLS students only. Attendance of first class strongly advised. Follows Mon/Wed rule. 1st class session meets Wed., Aug. 30.

  • Course #: LSHV-601-01
  • CRN: 12022
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: McNelis, C.
  • Dates: Aug 30 – Dec 20, 2017
  • Class Meetings:
    • Mon 6:30 PM - 9:30 PM, Maguire, Room 101

LSHV-603-01

DLS Foundational The Rise of the Modern Spirit

The major religious and epistemological issues of today have their roots in European thought and culture from the Enlightenment to the end of the nineteenth century. Traditional forms of Christianity were repeatedly challenged by the emerging spirits of modernity. The success of the new science in explaining the natural world, together with weariness due to the long strife over religious doctrine that followed the Reformation, gave rise to a new spirit of Enlightenment and a renewed confidence in the abilities of human reason. The critical study of history threatened the authority of both scripture and tradition. Skepticism about all claims to supernatural knowledge, reaching a climax in Hume and Kant, seemed to undermine the very core of religious belief. The struggle to reconcile traditional faith with these new forces produced a fascinating variety of issues and new religious ideas. The course reviews the highlights of this struggle and examines several of the significant alternatives in thinking about religion and human knowing that emerged during this period.

Note: Doctor of Liberal Studies students only. Attendance at first class session stongly advised.

  • Course #: LSHV-603-01
  • CRN: 24164
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Reynolds, T.
  • Dates: Aug 30 – Dec 20, 2017
  • Class Meetings:
    • Tue 6:30 PM - 9:30 PM, Maguire, Room 104
  • Syllabus: Download

LSHV-995-01

DLS Thesis Proposal/Thesis Writing

After successful completion of the Qualifying Examination, the DLS student reviews carefully the The Graduate Liberal Studies Guidelines for Thesis Writers, liberalstudies.georgetown.edu/DLS students/resources/thesis, downloads the DLS Thesis Proposal Form and registers for DLS Thesis Proposal Preparation/Thesis Writing in either the fall or spring term following the successful completion of the DLS Qualifying Examinations. During or prior to that semester the student, with the assistance of the DLS Director as needed, determines the tentative thesis topic and the three faculty members representing research areas appropriate to the topic. These faculty constitute the student’s Doctoral Thesis Committee, a Chair and two Readers. In general the Thesis Proposal includes an explanation and an outline of the topic of study, a preliminary bibliography, a suggested table of contents, and any special methodologies. Upon determining the topic and Thesis Committee and by mid-semester, the student must set a date for the “oral defense” of the completed Thesis Proposal by an examining board whose members are the student’s Thesis Committee and the members of the DLS Executive committee. Upon final approval of the Thesis Proposal the student proceeds with the research and writing of the Doctoral Thesis. Students registered for DLS Thesis Proposal Prep./Thesis Writing are encouraged during that semester to participate in the two session (Saturday and one evening) DLS Thesis Proposal Workshop which is offered once each Fall and Spring semester

Note: DLS Students only. Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of qualifying exam. Course certifies 1/2 time status. Repeatable course Fall and Spring terms with DLS Director's approval. Successful defense of proposal required prior to completion of term.

  • Course #: LSHV-995-01
  • CRN: 20361
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Glucklich, A.
  • Dates: Aug 30 – Dec 20, 2017
  • Class Meetings:

LSHV-996-01

DLS Thesis Writing

The Doctor of Liberal Studies thesis is expected to demonstrate a level of competence and academic rigor in the field of interdisciplinary studies comparable to, though distinct from, the equivalent level of competence and rigor expected in a Ph.D. thesis in a disciplinary field. Topics are limited to the liberal arts and social sciences and must be approved by the DLS Director. The Doctoral Thesis represents the creative synthesis of primary sources and secondary materials. Students must follow the Graduate Liberal Studies Guidelines for Thesis Writers provided each student upon successful completion of the Qualifying Examination for steps and procedures in the preparation and defense of the Thesis Proposal as well as the submission, defense, and approval of the DLS thesis. The Guidelines are also online, liberalstudies.georgetown.edu/DLS students/resources/thesis. Additionally, the student must follow the “rules” of manuscript preparation according to the methods provided in A Manual for Writers, 8th edition, Kate Turabian, in particular, the choice of one of the two suggested styles for citations.

Note: DLS Students only. Prerequisite:DLS thesis proposal and satisfactory defense of proposal. Course certifies 1/2 time status. Repeatable course Fall and Spring terms with DLS Director's approval. Pending graduate thesis defense must occur before Dec.1

  • Course #: LSHV-996-01
  • CRN: 20362
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Glucklich, A.
  • Dates: Aug 30 – Dec 20, 2017
  • Class Meetings:

LSHV-367-01

Foundation: Alienation and Self-Identity

In the last two hundred years, Europeans and Americans have frequently used the notion of alienation in conceiving of themselves. In fact, we might characterize these two centuries as a time in which, paradoxically enough, humans’ identity has been integrally linked with being, in some sense, ‘strange.’ The course will attempt to make sense of the many links and tensions between alienation and self-identity -- or strangeness and the self -- by examining strong voices in the development of the contemporary identity. While we will discuss all of the works in class, primary responsibility for composing a theory of the complex relationship between alienation and identity will rest upon the participants in the course. All written assignments will offer opportunities to articulate and develop those theories, as will class discussion and class presentations. The course will culminate in an examination of the artist Lucas Samaras for his modeling of the strange self.

Note: Graduate Liberal Studies Students only. Attendance at 1st class strongly advised

  • Course #: LSHV-367-01
  • CRN: 11995
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Ruf, F.
  • Dates: Aug 30 – Dec 20, 2017
  • Class Meetings:
    • Thu 6:30 PM - 9:30 PM, Maguire, Room 102
  • Syllabus: Download

LSHV-421-01

Globalization: The World's Path to the Present

“The past is the present. It’s the future, too.” Eugene O’Neill, Long Day’s Journey into Night “The exchange and spread of…information, items, and inconveniences, and human responses to them, is what shapes history. What drives history is the human ambition to alter one’s condition to match one’s hopes.” McNeill & McNeill, The Human Web “The history of interactions among disparate peoples is what shaped the modern world.” Jared Diamond, Guns, Germs, and Steel “…a long-term historical perspective does enable us to draw some meaningful conclusions about the past and present and to make educated forecasts for the future.” Robert B. Marks, The Origins of the Modern World This course is a selective introduction to some of the key issues and main themes of global history. History is a way of learning, and one goal of this course is to promote a better understanding of globalization and its impact on inter-societal relations by taking a broad historical approach.

Note: Graduate Liberal Studies students only. Attendance at 1st class strongly advised Following M/W rule, the first class meets Wed., Sept. 6.

  • Course #: LSHV-421-01
  • CRN: 24020
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Wall, M.
  • Dates: Aug 30 – Dec 20, 2017
  • Class Meetings:
  • Syllabus: Download

LSHV-485-01

Foundational: Theological Issues in the 20th and 21st Century Fiction

This seminar explores theological issues raised in recent best selling, prize winning fiction (Dan Brown’s DaVinci Code, Michael Cunningham's The Hours, Ian McEwan’s Atonement, Yann Martel's Life of Pi, Sue Monk Kidd's The Secret Life of Bees, Edward P. Jones’s All Aunt Hagar’s Children, and Marilynne Robinson’s Home) against a background of earlier, theologically sophisticated literary works (T. S. Eliot's The Cocktail Party and Shusako Endo's Silence). Each work offers a unique window on the present and an opportunity to take theological bearings in a rapidly changing world. A background in theology is not required for this course, though the writings assume a basic familiarity with the Gospel.

Note: Graduate Liberal Studies only. Attendance at 1st class strongly advised. Following Mon/Wed rule, Wed. course starts Sept. 6.

  • Course #: LSHV-485-01
  • CRN: 32500
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: O'Brien, W.
  • Dates: Aug 30 – Dec 20, 2017
  • Class Meetings:
  • Syllabus: Download

LSHV-444-01

Scorpions in the Constitutional Bottle: Uncivil Speech, Civil Society

Free Speech is very much about line-drawing. We are generally agreed that political speech, no matter how heated, is the hallmark of an open society, and highly protected under the First Amendment. We are also generally agreed that you can't cry fire in a crowded theater when there is no fire; and that child pornography is bereft of any constitutional protection. Those are easy. What about the gray areas, where unfettered speech is a threat to safety, to reputation, to national security, to morality? In pushing the free speech envelope, how far is too far? Where (if at all) should society -- and the Supreme Court -- draw the line? Justice Brandeis, a champion of free speech, noted that "freedom to think as you will and to speak as you think are means indispensable to the discovery and spread of political truth. " Justice Holmes, also a proponent, nonetheless cautioned that speech free of reasonable fetter, if unchecked, can lead to anarchy and convert the Bill of Rights "into a suicide pact." Who is right? Are they all right? When is speech so uncivil that domestic tranquility takes precedence? What is lost and what is gained as a society in resolving these tensions? This course grapples with these issues. Through historical analysis and case study of the leading Supreme Court speech cases, we will examine the interplay between speech and censorship, liberty and order; majoritarianism and libertarianiasm; and the legal, societal and ethical implications of the Supreme Court's First Amendment pronouncements in the volatile, contenitous/perpetually vexing area.

Note: Graduate Liberal Studies Students only. Attendance at 1st class strongly advised.First class meeting is Sept. 9

  • Course #: LSHV-444-01
  • CRN: 30780
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Quirk, R.
  • Dates: Aug 30 – Dec 20, 2017
  • Class Meetings:
  • Syllabus: Download

LSHV-469-01

Greco-Roman Epic Poetry and Its Offspring

Note: Graduate Liberal Studies only. Attendance at 1st class strongly advised.

  • Course #: LSHV-469-01
  • CRN: 32989
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Soltes, O.
  • Dates: Aug 30 – Dec 20, 2017
  • Class Meetings:
  • Syllabus: Download

LSHV-988-01

MALS Continuous Reg. (HT)

Note: Continuous Registration must be taken by MALS candidates who have an Incomplete in Thesis Writing. No scheduled classes. Final Thesis approval due date is Nov. 1, 2017. Course certifies 1/2 time status.

  • Course #: LSHV-988-01
  • CRN: 32505
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Ridder, A.
  • Dates: Aug 30 – Dec 20, 2017
  • Class Meetings:

LSHV-981-01

MALS Thesis Proposal (HT)

Effective Fall 2013, (a) this course will carry an automatic program fee of $500, (b) may only be taken once after receiving an "Incomplete" in Thesis Writing, and (c) has been re-numbered from 991/992. If students do not complete Thesis Writing, s/he must register in the next semester in "MALS Thesis Continuous Registration I" which carries a $500 fee charge, is 0-credits and is part-time status. Students may take "MALS Thesis Continuous Reg. I" only once. If the student decides to withdraw from Thesis Writing before the deadline, s/he can pursue the 36-cr./Coursework degree plan. No exceptions will be considered.

Note: Graduate Liberal Studies only. This is a required course for the 30 credit/thesis track MALS degree. 1/2 time status with one course, Fall, Spring, and Summer terms. Students must attend all four sessions and have mentor and topic selected before the first session. Repeatable course with Liberal Studies Dean's office approval

  • Course #: LSHV-981-01
  • CRN: 27239
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Duke, E.
  • Dates: Aug 30 – Dec 20, 2017
  • Class Meetings:

LSHV-982-01

MALS Thesis Writing (HT)

Note: Pre-req 27 earned credits and satisfactory in MALS Thesis Proposal. Thesis Writing not repeatable. Mentor and Dean thesis approval due Nov. 1, 2017. Course certifies 1/2 time status. No scheduled classes.


LSHV-445-01

Managerial and Organizational Ethics

Major issues in contemporary managerial and organizational ethics will be addressed from a liberal arts “values” perspective in this course. Case studies, audio-visual vignettes, and management simulations and exercises will be combined with class discussion to analyze the following topics among others: organizational due process; employee rights; employment discrimination; managerial values and organizational culture; ethical decision-making in an international and global context; organizational governance; environmental issues; consumer and community stakeholder issues; and ethical codes of conduct. (If you have taken Business Ethics: A Liberal Arts Perspective, do not register for this course.)

Note: Graduate Liberal Studies only. Attendance at 1st class strongly advised.

  • Course #: LSHV-445-01
  • CRN: 32497
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: McCabe, D.
  • Dates: Aug 30 – Dec 20, 2017
  • Class Meetings:
  • Syllabus: Download

LSHV-493-01

Political Theology

There is no question that we are witnessing a revival of political theology as an academic discipline; a theology that has, through the ages, adapted to exigencies like secularization, modernization, globalization, et al. As an academic discipline, political theology addresses questions such as, the relationship between theology and politics; the relationship between Church and State; the role of religion in public life; and, to what extend religious belief might/should shape our political discourse.

Note: Graduate Liberal Studies only. Attendance at 1st class strongly advised. First class session is Sept. 6th.


LSHV-377-01

U.S. Cults:Relig Extrem/Meanin

Religious extremism is a reaction to the perceived chaos and loneliness of modern life, and un-derstanding why people join and how people leave is crucial. This course will take a socio-psychological approach to understanding how cults in America originate, who is attracted to join-ing, and the legal issues cults generate. We will explore such issues as: -Are cults protected under ‘religious liberty’ laws? -What defines a religion? -Why are some cults prone to violence? -Is ‘brainwashing’ an actual phenomenon? -Are cults always ‘bad’?

Note: Graduate Liberal Studies Students only. Attendance at 1st class strongly advised

  • Course #: LSHV-377-01
  • CRN: 30775
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Steenhuisen, L.
  • Dates: Aug 30 – Dec 20, 2017
  • Class Meetings:
    • Tue 6:30 PM - 9:30 PM, Maguire, Room 102
  • Syllabus: Download

LSHV-380-01

Values and Issues in International Affairs

Since the moral issues involved in the Cold War receded, the world has faced new ethical problems involving environmental action, trade policy, economic sanctions, dealing with terrorism, use of drones, cyberwarfare, mass refugee flows, and decisions on when and where to intervene abroad to aid those suffering from atrocities and ethnic conflicts. Actually, in both periods most of the moral choices have just been variations on themes as old as civilization. This course will stress the processes of "moral reasoning" to decide where a nation's obligations lie when moral principles conflict. This is a course in "applied ethics". We will take the moral principles generally used by writers on international ethics and apply them to currently relevant political, economic, military, and environmental topics. We will briefly contrast various approaches to the role of morality in international affairs: realism vs. idealism, absolutism vs. consequentialism, and natural law vs. positive law. However, this is not a course in the philosophy of international ethics. We will not be concerned with how the main writers in the field have derived the approaches they take, that is, we will not be looking into the epistemology of international ethics. Thus we will be more concerned with the writings of Michael Walzer, Stanley Hoffman, and Reinhold Niebuhr than with those of Aristotle, Kant, and John Rawls.

Note: Graduate Liberal Studies Students only. Attendance at 1st class strongly advised Follow Mon,Wed rule; 1st class session meets Sept 6th

  • Course #: LSHV-380-01
  • CRN: 21775
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Douglas, W.
  • Dates: Aug 30 – Dec 20, 2017
  • Class Meetings:
  • Syllabus: Download