Course Schedule for Spring 2017


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LSHV-399-01

Foundation: A Sense of Place: Values and Identity

The Romans called it genius loci. Modern thinkers and writers call it “a sense of place.” Today, diverse disciplines are rekindling an awareness of the importance of the concept of place. Prominent poets, novelists, historians, architects, geographers, literary critics, folklorists, preservationists, and urbanists/communitarians are exploring place’s significance to their disciplines, their visions of society, and in their personal lives. And now twenty-first century neuroscientists are offering new perspectives into the cause and effect of place. “Place Matters” was the title of the 2015 Association of Graduate Liberal Studies Programs’ annual conference. Place is not mere geography. It is a cerebral and emotional blend of associations, an awareness that is part physical, part science, and part history, culture and social memory, an affective bond between people and place or settings. Place can take the form of a community, a neighborhood, a building, a room, or a memory site. It can be Walden Pond, Old Faithful, or Huck Finn’s raft on the Mississippi, the Land of Oz, or Camelot. Some find place in a flag, a ceremony, a ritual, a dish of food, a song, or an event. Ground Zero, Little Big Horn, Chartres Cathedral, Julia Child’s kitchen, or a small town’s park or library can be a place. So can your grandfather’s workshop or an author’s oeuvre such as Wendell Berry’s Port William, KY or Faulkner’s Yoknapatawpha County, MS. It can have meaning to a person, a community, a nation, or mankind. The United Nations designates over nine hundred “world heritage sites.” In sum, place is a way of understanding the world and ourselves.

Note: 150 minutes of distance learning required. Attendance at first class strongly advised. Follow Mon/Wed rule. First class session is Wed., Jan. 18.

  • Course #: LSHV-399-01
  • CRN: 30197
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Yonkers, C.
  • Dates: Jan 11 – May 01, 2017
  • Class Meetings:
  • Syllabus: Download

LSHV-453-01

The Book of Genesis: Literature, Ethics, and Theology

To quote the flyleaf from Robert Alter’s translation of Genesis, which we will use in class: “Genesis begins with the making of heaven and earth and all life, and ends with the image of a mummy – Joseph’s – in a coffin. In between come many of the primal stories in Western culture: Adam and Eve’s expulsion from the Garden of Eden, Cain’s murder of Abel, Noah and the Flood, the destruction of Sodom and Gomorrah, Abraham’s binding of Isaac, the covenant of God and Abraham, the saga of Joseph and his brothers. These are stories we attend to throughout our lives, for their beauty, their emotional resonance, their philosophical weight, and their sacredness. They connect us with one another and with generations to come.” In this course we will explore together the stories from the book of Genesis, with special attention to their literary quality, their ethical content, and their theological implications.

Note: Attendance at first class strongly advised.

  • Course #: LSHV-453-01
  • CRN: 31903
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Linafelt, T.
  • Dates: Jan 11 – May 01, 2017
  • Class Meetings:
    • Thu 6:30 PM - 9:30 PM, Reiss, Room 281
  • Syllabus: Download

LSHV-455-01

Classics in the Catholic Tradition

Students will be introduced to classic texts from the Catholic tradition. Although the course will proceed chronologically through the Christian centuries, the approach will be more systematic than historical: each work will be considered as yet another realization of a momentous and foundational religious event.

Note: Attendance at first class strongly advised. Follows Mon/Wed rule. First class session is Jan. 18.

  • Course #: LSHV-455-01
  • CRN: 31904
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: O'Brien, W.
  • Dates: Jan 11 – May 01, 2017
  • Class Meetings:
  • Syllabus: Download

LSHV-602-01

DLS Foundational Love, Death, and God: From the Bible through the Renaissance

“The approach taken in the Foundational courses is primarily historical….their goal is to make the student aware of the complex historical dynamics of cultural evolution by careful analysis of selected episodes of important cultural conflict, continuity, and change, so as to identify the multiple interactions of the subject matters of traditional academic disciplines in such episodes…Such interdisciplinary inquiry is designed to produce a style of questioning that more realistically corresponds to the actual dynamics of human cultural development throughout history.” Handbook, p. 9 In this course we will focus on the relationship between text and context in Europe within a global framework. The discipline of history investigates the ways in which human society experiences change and continuity. It provides, through generations of historians, working, for the most part, in a collegial fashion, an increasingly complex context for understanding the human story. The thematic focus of the course will be on the interaction of rulers and religion, what is today called the relationship between church and state. The organization of the course is around texts and contexts between the time of the Roman Empire to the early modern period in European history as we approach the rise of religious toleration and the Enlightenment.

Note: 2nd DLS Foundational Seminar, must take in sequence. Attendance at first class strongly advised.


LSHV-604-01

DLS Foundational The Challenge of Postmodernism

The fourth and final required foundational course focuses on the period from roughly 1850 to the present, loosely characterized as “postmodern.” This course covers issues from an interdisciplinary perspective because the realities of cultural evolution and conflict demonstrate the interaction of economic, political, religious, moral, scientific and aesthetic forces, as well as other factors peculiar to particular societies and time periods. Specific topics, texts, thematic emphases, and approaches to these periods may vary. Course may not be repeated for credit. Pre-Requisites: LSHV 601; LSHV 602; LSHV 603

Note: 4th DLS Foundational Seminar, must take in sequence. Attendance at first class strongly advised.


LSHV-378-01

Path to the Future: The U.S. in the 21st Century World

In 1941, the publisher Henry Luce predicted the coming of what he called the “American Century.” According to Luce, the time had arrived for Americans “to accept wholeheartedly our duty and our opportunity as the most powerful and vital nation of the world and in consequence to assert upon the world the full impact of our influence, for such means as we see fit.” In the decades that followed, many Americans enthusiastically accepted this challenge and the remaining decades of the 20th century bore witness to their efforts. But what have been the consequences for the United States, and the world, in the “present”? Although much of the attention directed toward US foreign policy in the last several years has been focused the “War on Terrorism,” a vast number of other significant issues also present the United States with challenges and opportunities in the 21st century. While not ignoring the “War on Terrorism,” this course also will examine some of the other areas of policy as a means of assessing the current global status of the United States and providing insight regarding its “path to the future.”

Note: Attendance at first class strongly advised. Follow Mon/Wed rule. First class session is Wed, Jan. 18.

  • Course #: LSHV-378-01
  • CRN: 31900
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Wall, M.
  • Dates: Jan 11 – May 01, 2017
  • Class Meetings:
  • Syllabus: Download

LSHV-394-01   Canceled

The Court, The Constitution, and the Shaping of the American Nation

Tracing the development of the United States through the key Supreme Court decisions from Marbury v. Madison to Bush v. Gore, this course focuses on the power center at the other end of the Avenue instead of the White House. John Marshall, not Jefferson, laid the groundwork for the modern American nation by articulating decidedly non-Jeffersonian concepts in Marbury and McCulloch. Earl Warren, not Congress or the President, implemented the Second Reconstruction through Brown v. Board of Education. Warren Burger toppled a vast criminal enterprise operated out of the Oval Office by saying, in essence, the emperor has no executive privilege clothes (United States v. Nixon). Other issues include the Commerce Power; the constitutional twilight zone (Presidential warmaking short of war); the Court's foray into intra-branch warfare (which led to FDR's Court-Packing Plan); the Court's employment of the "equal protection" clause of the Fourteenth Amendment to cut the Gordian knot of racial apartheid, and also to create "penumbral" constitutional rights found nowhere in the text of the document.

Note: Course has 90 minutes of additional class meeting time. Attendance at first class is strongly advised.

  • Course #: LSHV-394-01
  • CRN: 30196
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: TBD
  • Dates: Jan 11 – May 01, 2017
  • Class Meetings:
  • Syllabus: Download

LSHV-408-01   Canceled

Ethical Problems in Contemporary Society

The Purpose of this course is to provide an introduction to basic moral concepts. The course examines the relationship between moral teachings and the broader theological or philosophical framework in which they occur, analyzes positions taken by religious moralists on particular issues, and compares those positions with those of secular thinker. The course does not develop any particular theological position; it focuses on representative religious and secular thinkers and attempts to analyze their worldviews and their positions on selected issues. The course begins with a discussion about the relation of religious beliefs and moral convictions, including arguments for and against moral absolutes, and offers an introduction on normative ethical systems and community-based views of ethics. It then deals with moral interpretations of sexuality, especially in relation to the genesis of human life. The course then moves directly to discussions of abortion and war and concludes with a discussion of euthanasia and suicide. As a foundation course in the MALS Program, the course will place a premium on developing a number of academic skills, including the ability to analyze texts with care, to write constructive essays on controversial subject, and to present and defend one's position in a seminar setting.

Note: Attendance at first class strongly advised.

  • Course #: LSHV-408-01
  • CRN: 30550
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: TBD
  • Dates: Jan 11 – May 01, 2017
  • Class Meetings:
  • Syllabus: Download

LSHV-988-01

MALS Continuous Reg. (HT)

Note: Must be taken by MALS candidates who have an "Incomplete" in Thesis Writing. No scheduled classes. Final thesis approval date is 4/1/17.

  • Course #: LSHV-988-01
  • CRN: 33080
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Ridder, A.
  • Dates: Jan 11 – May 01, 2017
  • Class Meetings:

LSHV-983-01

MALS Thesis Proposal (FT)

  • Course #: LSHV-983-01
  • CRN: 33081
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Duke, E.
  • Dates: Jan 11 – May 01, 2017
  • Class Meetings:

LSHV-981-01

MALS Thesis Proposal (HT)

Effective Fall 2013, (a) this course will carry an automatic program fee of $500, (b) may only be taken once after receiving an "Incomplete" in Thesis Writing, and (c) has been re-numbered from 991/992. If students do not complete Thesis Writing, s/he must register in the next semester in "MALS Thesis Continuous Registration I" which carries a $500 fee charge, is 0-credits and is part-time status. Students may take "MALS Thesis Continuous Reg. I" only once. If the student decides to withdraw from Thesis Writing before the deadline, s/he can pursue the 36-cr./Coursework degree plan. No exceptions will be considered.

Note: This course certifies half-time status. Final thesis approval is April 1st, 2017. Repeatable in Fall and Spring terms only. Course meets 1/26, 2/23, 3/16, and 4/20. Must have completed seven courses (21 credits); must have 3.0 GPA.

  • Course #: LSHV-981-01
  • CRN: 26810
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Duke, E.
  • Dates: Jan 11 – May 01, 2017
  • Class Meetings:

LSHV-898-01

MALS Thesis Proposal Workshop

Effective with Fall 2013, this course will be re-numbered from LSHV-497 to LSHV-898. The Workshop is required of all Masters' candidates as well as all Bachelors' candidates who elect the thesis option. The Thesis Proposal Workshop consists of four two-hour sessions; students must attend all four sessions of the Workshop. There are no exceptions. Each student is guided through the creation of a thesis proposal, which over the course of the semester must be approved by the mentor chosen by the student, by the professor conducting the Workshop, and then the Associate Director of the Graduate Liberal Studies Degree Program. This is a zero-credit, zero-tuition course that you must register for in the semester before you register for the Thesis Writing course. The grade is a "Pass" or "Fail." The Workshop cannot be taken at the same time of the registration into the Thesis Writing course. Satisfactory completion of this workshop is necessary before registering for the Thesis Writing course. You may also be registered for another course in the semester in which you register for the Thesis Proposal Workshop. Also read further information on the thesis preparation process by going to the Graduate Liberal Studies Degree Program. Note: During the Fall and Spring terms the zero-credit Thesis Proposal Workshop, taken in conjunction with a three-credit course, constitutes half-time enrollment status.

Note: Students must have mentor/thesis topic prior to first class meeting. May be repeated 1X, only. This section certifies half-time status. Prerequisite: must have 21 earned hours (7 courses) prior to Spring 2016 semester Students must attend all four sessions.


LSHV-899-01   Canceled

MALS Thesis Writing

This is a course (final three credits) taken at the end of the student's degree program. The Thesis Writing is for the actual production/completion of the thesis, carries three credits (and tuition charges), and is assigned a letter grade by the mentor directing the thesis. There are no class sessions. Also read further information on the thesis preparation process by going to the Graduate Liberal Studies Program website: http://scs.georgetown.edu/departments/9/master-of-arts-in-liberal-studies/resources-and-policies.cfm#thesis. This course is considered as half-time, which should be noted by students in regard to their visa or loan enrollment guidelines, stipulations, and student status.

Note: Halftime Status. Students must have 27 earned credit hours and 3.0 cumulative G.P.A. to register Final thesis approval is April 1st, 2017.

  • Course #: LSHV-899-01
  • CRN: 26553
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: TBD
  • Dates: Jan 11 – May 01, 2017
  • Class Meetings:

LSHV-984-01

MALS Thesis Writing (FT)

  • Course #: LSHV-984-01
  • CRN: 33082
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Ridder, A.
  • Dates: Jan 11 – May 01, 2017
  • Class Meetings:

LSHV-982-01

MALS Thesis Writing (HT)

Note: Pre-req 27 earned credits and Satisfactory in MALS Thesis Proposal. Course certifies half-time status.

  • Course #: LSHV-982-01
  • CRN: 33079
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Ridder, A.
  • Dates: Jan 11 – May 01, 2017
  • Class Meetings:

LSHV-504-01

Religion & Politics in the US

The scholarly literature on American political parties is vast. This course examines the major themes and research on the role and contributions of political parties to the maintenance of democracy in the United States. We will survey the parameters of the literature, including the structure and operation of party organization, the role and effects of political parties in government (Executive Branch, Congress, Judiciary), and the origins, stability, and party identification within the American electorate and its effects on political interest, attitudes, and behavior. Topics to be covered in depth include two-party vs. multi-party systems, party polarization (the blue-state/red-state divide), and presidential elections. During the semester, we also will follow events leading up to the 2006 midterm Congressional elections and discuss and analyze all developments surrounding the 2008 presidential elections in light of our readings. DLS and MALS students only.

Note: Attendance at first class strongly advised.

  • Course #: LSHV-504-01
  • CRN: 32609
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Steenhuisen, L.
  • Dates: Jan 11 – May 13, 2017
  • Class Meetings:
  • Syllabus: Download

LSHV-436-01

Russia: Politics and Culture through Literature and Film

Note: Attendance at first class strongly advised.

  • Course #: LSHV-436-01
  • CRN: 32607
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Zelensky, E.
  • Dates: Jan 11 – May 13, 2017
  • Class Meetings:
    • Tue 6:30 PM - 9:30 PM, Reiss, Room 264
  • Syllabus: Download

LSHV-388-01

Slavery and Roman Culture

Note: Attendance at first class strongly advised.

  • Course #: LSHV-388-01
  • CRN: 31901
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Hock, R.
  • Dates: Jan 11 – May 01, 2017
  • Class Meetings:
  • Syllabus: Download

LSHV-351-01   Canceled

The Pursuit of Peace

This course, the counterpart to “The Problem of War,” will approach the subject of peace and related contemporary issues from a variety of perspectives – historical, analytical, comparative-empirical, humanistic, ethical, interdisciplinary, and policy. Consistent with the foregoing LSP goals, the required reading assignments, class discussions, and major research paper(s) seek to foster analytical thinking, comparative study, interdisciplinarity, and humanistic values-based assessments of the practical challenges of managing conflict and making peace in the contemporary world in a variety of contexts – global, international, national, and local. Policy options and choices will be evaluated according to their expected and actual costs, benefits, and moral implications.

Note: Attendance at first class strongly advised. Follows Mon/Wed rule. First class session is Jan. 11.

  • Course #: LSHV-351-01
  • CRN: 31899
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: TBD
  • Dates: Jan 11 – May 01, 2017
  • Class Meetings:
  • Syllabus: Download

LSHV-471-01

What Is Italian Renaissance?

Note: Attendance at first class strongly advised.

  • Course #: LSHV-471-01
  • CRN: 32634
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Soltes, O.
  • Dates: Jan 11 – May 13, 2017
  • Class Meetings:
  • Syllabus: Download