Course Schedule for Fall 2019


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LSHV-436-01

Russia: Politics and Culture through Literature and Film

In this course we shall study Russia from 1855-2018 as a traditional society confronted with the challenge of modernity. Our primary source materials will be taken from some of the major works of Russian literature and cinema of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries; Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Bulgakov, Solzhenitsyn, Pudovkin and Eisenstein, among others, will provide us with the living material through which we shall trace changes and continuities in Russian society over the last 150 years. In our post-Soviet unit we shall pay particular attention to the role of Ukraine in the formation of modern Russian self-identity, in view of current events. We will also consider the present-day importance of the 1917 centennial.


LSHV-367-01

MALS FND: Alienation and Self-Identity

In the last two hundred years, Europeans and Americans have frequently used the notion of alienation in conceiving of themselves. In fact, we might characterize these two centuries as a time in which, paradoxically enough, humans’ identity has been integrally linked with being, in some sense, ‘strange.’ The course will attempt to make sense of the many links and tensions between alienation and self-identity -- or strangeness and the self -- by examining strong voices in the development of the contemporary identity. While we will discuss all of the works in class, primary responsibility for composing a theory of the complex relationship between alienation and identity will rest upon the participants in the course. All written assignments will offer opportunities to articulate and develop those theories, as will class discussion and class presentations. The course will culminate in an examination of the artist Lucas Samaras for his modeling of the strange self.

Note: Graduate Liberal Studies Students only. Attendance at 1st class strongly advised

  • Course #: LSHV-367-01
  • CRN: 11995
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Ruf, F.
  • Dates: Aug 28 – Dec 20, 2019
  • Class Meetings:
  • Syllabus: Download

LSHV-480-01

CBL:Jesuit Values:ProfPractice

The mission of the School of Continuing Studies at Georgetown University is to “educate students to become more reflective, active, purposeful citizens who strive to improve themselves and our shared world, embodying Georgetown’s Catholic and Jesuit values and heritage and respecting the principles and traditions of each individual.” What are Jesuit values, why do they matter in your education at SCS, and how do you put them into action in your professional lives? Using the Jesuit pedagogical model of a constant interplay of experience-reflection-action, this course introduces students to the core Jesuit values and engages them by means of lectures, guest speakers, individual reflections, class discussion, and community service experiences outside of the classroom. All students will be responsible for taking on a direct community service activity as part of the class (an average of 1 to 2 hours each week for a total of 20-40 hours over the course of the semester), an experiential learning exercise that will provide data for ongoing individual and group reflections. This course also serves as a gateway to the resources offered at Georgetown for students to explore Jesuit values in greater depth, including opportunities for community-based service, research, and spiritual development. The university’s Office of Mission and Ministry and Center for Social Justice, Research, Teaching & Service (CSJ) are highly involved in the delivery of the class. Open to students in all programs offered at SCS, this course is truly interdisciplinary. Taking seriously the encouragement of recent Jesuit General Congregations to seek greater understanding of religions and cultures by robust engagement with them, students will be continually challenged to approach their own practice areas with new eyes by exploring perspectives from the broad and inclusive professional community at SCS. Students should take away from this course a clear understanding of Georgetown’s Jesuit mission and be able to put into action values inspired by a 450-year-old educational tradition and thereby enhance one’s own professional development. Special note: This class is open to and welcomes students from all faith traditions or no faith tradition.

Note: This three-credit elective is open to students in the MALS and MPS programs. In addition to readings and assignments, students commit to 1-2 hours per week of community service with a community-based organization as part of course requirements. Course is delivered in collaboration with the University's Office of Mission and Ministry and the Center for Social Justice, Research, Teaching & Service.

  • Course #: LSHV-480-01
  • CRN: 31553
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Kralovec, P.
  • Dates: Aug 28 – Dec 20, 2019
  • Class Meetings:
  • Syllabus: Download

LSHV-603-01

DLS Foundational 3

Students in the DLS program are joining a centuries-long series of conversations and heated debates concerning the deceptively simple questions that lie at the heart of Liberal Studies, philosophical inquiry, and human values: How do we know? How do we make meaning out of the world and experience? How do we represent reality? How do we interpret reality? How do we form and rewrite traditions of knowledge, language, and power? What does it mean to live a good life? In the third DLS core course, students will continue to explore how these questions have been posed and answers have been attempted in the modern and postmodern critical contexts (19th through early 21st century), centuries that have seen striking changes from positivist, humanist outlooks upon the world shift to deconstruction and “posthuman” perspectives. We will explore these questions through a series of paired readings in fiction and critical theory, divided into interrelated thematic units of signs, gender theory, ecocriticism and critical race theory. Our readings will focus on works that question and rewrite master narratives, explore the nature of subjectivity, the limits of self and other, and history and fiction. At the end of the semester, students will be familiar with some of the major currents in critical theory.

  • Course #: LSHV-603-01
  • CRN: 35167
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Francomano, E.
  • Dates: Aug 28 – Dec 20, 2019
  • Class Meetings:

LSHV-601-01

DLS Foundational 1

This course introduces the student to the history, rationale, and focus of graduate Liberal Studies as a doctoral field. It provides a framework for the entering doctoral student in terms of establishing the foundations and interdisciplinary focus of graduate work in the field. There are three stages to the course. (1) It begins with a broad overview of the pre-modern Western tradition, with guest lectures and readings from the classical to the early modern eras, designed to provide historical context for the emergence of modernity in the Western tradition. (2) In the second part, the emphasis shifts to methodology and research as a way of preparing the entering doctoral student for graduate Liberal Studies at Georgetown University. Readings and additional guest lectures help the student develop a fuller sense of how particular disciplines function within the context of interdisciplinary analysis. (3) The final section of the course involves an in-class workshop on research methods and then a final set of round table student presentations on their research topics for the term paper. The research topic will be chosen, in consultation with the professor, so the student can explore some aspect of his/her stated area of interest for the D.L.S

  • Course #: LSHV-601-01
  • CRN: 35165
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: McNelis, C.
  • Dates: Aug 28 – Dec 20, 2019
  • Class Meetings:
    • Mon 6:30 PM - 9:30 PM, Maguire, Room 104

LSHV-990-01

DLS Qualifying Exam

This section of DLS Qualifying Exam Prep is intended for students who have enrolled in the program primarily on a part-time basis (3-6 credits per semester) and who intend to complete their DLS Qualifying Exam at a similar pace. This section counts as Half-Time Status. Notes: DLS students only. 36 hrs completed. Student provides exam checklist to Asst. Dean by Sept. 15th. Course certifies half-time status Repeatable course Fall and Spring terms with DLS Director approval

Note: DLS students only. 36 hrs completed. Student provides exam checklist to Liberal Studies Dean's office by Sept. 30th. Course certifies half time status. Repeatable course Fall and Spring terms with DLS Director's approval

  • Course #: LSHV-990-01
  • CRN: 26239
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Glucklich, A.
  • Dates: Aug 28 – Dec 20, 2019
  • Class Meetings:

LSHV-997-01

DLS Thesis Proposal/Thesis Writing

Note: Register with approval of DLS Director. Course certifies for full-time status 36 hours completed Student provides exam check list to Liberal Studies Dean’s office by Sept. 30th. Repeatable course Fall and Spring terms with DLS Director's approval.

  • Course #: LSHV-997-01
  • CRN: 29996
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Glucklich, A.
  • Dates: Aug 28 – Dec 20, 2019
  • Class Meetings:

LSHV-995-01

DLS Thesis Proposal/Thesis Writing

After successful completion of the Qualifying Examination, the DLS student reviews carefully the The Graduate Liberal Studies Guidelines for Thesis Writers, liberalstudies.georgetown.edu/DLS students/resources/thesis, downloads the DLS Thesis Proposal Form and registers for DLS Thesis Proposal Preparation/Thesis Writing in either the fall or spring term following the successful completion of the DLS Qualifying Examinations. During or prior to that semester the student, with the assistance of the DLS Director as needed, determines the tentative thesis topic and the three faculty members representing research areas appropriate to the topic. These faculty constitute the student’s Doctoral Thesis Committee, a Chair and two Readers. In general the Thesis Proposal includes an explanation and an outline of the topic of study, a preliminary bibliography, a suggested table of contents, and any special methodologies. Upon determining the topic and Thesis Committee and by mid-semester, the student must set a date for the “oral defense” of the completed Thesis Proposal by an examining board whose members are the student’s Thesis Committee and the members of the DLS Executive committee. Upon final approval of the Thesis Proposal the student proceeds with the research and writing of the Doctoral Thesis. Students registered for DLS Thesis Proposal Prep./Thesis Writing are encouraged during that semester to participate in the two session (Saturday and one evening) DLS Thesis Proposal Workshop which is offered once each Fall and Spring semester

Note: DLS Students only. Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of qualifying exam. Course certifies 1/2 time status. Repeatable course Fall and Spring terms with DLS Director's approval. Successful defense of proposal required prior to completion of term.


LSHV-996-01

DLS Thesis Writing

The Doctor of Liberal Studies thesis is expected to demonstrate a level of competence and academic rigor in the field of interdisciplinary studies comparable to, though distinct from, the equivalent level of competence and rigor expected in a Ph.D. thesis in a disciplinary field. Topics are limited to the liberal arts and social sciences and must be approved by the DLS Director. The Doctoral Thesis represents the creative synthesis of primary sources and secondary materials. Students must follow the Graduate Liberal Studies Guidelines for Thesis Writers provided each student upon successful completion of the Qualifying Examination for steps and procedures in the preparation and defense of the Thesis Proposal as well as the submission, defense, and approval of the DLS thesis. The Guidelines are also online, liberalstudies.georgetown.edu/DLS students/resources/thesis. Additionally, the student must follow the “rules” of manuscript preparation according to the methods provided in A Manual for Writers, 8th edition, Kate Turabian, in particular, the choice of one of the two suggested styles for citations.

Note: DLS Students only. Prerequisite:DLS thesis proposal and satisfactory defense of proposal. Course certifies 1/2 time status. Repeatable course Fall and Spring terms with DLS Director's approval. Pending graduate thesis defense must occur before Dec.1

  • Course #: LSHV-996-01
  • CRN: 20362
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Glucklich, A.
  • Dates: Aug 28 – Dec 20, 2019
  • Class Meetings:

LSHV-421-01

Globalization: The World's Path to the Present

“The past is the present. It’s the future, too.” Eugene O’Neill, Long Day’s Journey into Night “The exchange and spread of…information, items, and inconveniences, and human responses to them, is what shapes history. What drives history is the human ambition to alter one’s condition to match one’s hopes.” McNeill & McNeill, The Human Web “The history of interactions among disparate peoples is what shaped the modern world.” Jared Diamond, Guns, Germs, and Steel “…a long-term historical perspective does enable us to draw some meaningful conclusions about the past and present and to make educated forecasts for the future.” Robert B. Marks, The Origins of the Modern World This course is a selective introduction to some of the key issues and main themes of global history. History is a way of learning, and one goal of this course is to promote a better understanding of globalization and its impact on inter-societal relations by taking a broad historical approach.

  • Course #: LSHV-421-01
  • CRN: 36550
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Wall, M.
  • Dates: Aug 28 – Dec 20, 2019
  • Class Meetings:

LSHV-988-01

MALS Continuous Reg. (HT)

Note: Continuous Registration must be taken by MALS candidates who have an Incomplete in Thesis Writing. No scheduled classes. Final Thesis approval due date is Nov. 1, 2017. Course certifies 1/2 time status.


LSHV-400-01   NEW!

MALS FND: Science and Society

The history of science and its ongoing discoveries are surveyed, to track methods of empirical inquiry and examine major impacts of scientific theories on the understanding of humans, our capabilities, and our interactions with each other and the world. Scientific and humanistic perspectives upon being human, and on trying to be more human, are often deeply divergent. Yet the methods of scientific inquiry are as cognitively and creatively human as any endeavor we undertake, for better comprehending our humanity and our place in the world. Through the standpoint of science, and innovations in technosciences, it is possible to reimagine and reinterpret how we experience life and engage with the social world. Scientific advances powerfully interact with the cultural context of moral norms, social institutions, political forces, and legal regulations, which in turn shape the utilization of emerging technosciences. This course examines these engagements from the 1940s to the present day and into the perceivable near-future. The course emphasizes the public understanding of science and technology, ethical viewpoints on important technosciences, and broader social impacts due to technoscience on global scales.

Note: For MALS students only. This is the first MALS required foundational course.

  • Course #: LSHV-400-01
  • CRN: 36655
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Shook, J.
  • Dates: Aug 28 – Dec 20, 2019
  • Class Meetings:
  • Syllabus: Download

LSHV-983-01

MALS Thesis Prop. Wksp. (FT)

Note: Graduate Liberal Studies only. This is a required course for the 30 credit/thesis track MALS degree. Full time status with one course, Fall, Spring, and Summer terms. Students must attend all four sessions and have mentor and topic selected before the first session. Repeatable course with Liberal Studies Dean's office approval

  • Course #: LSHV-983-01
  • CRN: 32503
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Duke, E.
  • Dates: Aug 28 – Dec 20, 2019
  • Class Meetings:
  • Syllabus: Download

LSHV-981-01

MALS Thesis Prop. Wksp. (HT)

Effective Fall 2013, (a) this course will carry an automatic program fee of $500, (b) may only be taken once after receiving an "Incomplete" in Thesis Writing, and (c) has been re-numbered from 991/992. If students do not complete Thesis Writing, s/he must register in the next semester in "MALS Thesis Continuous Registration I" which carries a $500 fee charge, is 0-credits and is part-time status. Students may take "MALS Thesis Continuous Reg. I" only once. If the student decides to withdraw from Thesis Writing before the deadline, s/he can pursue the 36-cr./Coursework degree plan. No exceptions will be considered.

Note: Graduate Liberal Studies only. This is a required course for the 30 credit/thesis track MALS degree. 1/2 time status with one course, Fall, Spring, and Summer terms. Students must attend all four sessions and have mentor and topic selected before the first session. Repeatable course with Liberal Studies Dean's office approval. Meets 9/6, 10/4, 11/1, and 11/29.

  • Course #: LSHV-981-01
  • CRN: 27239
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Duke, E.
  • Dates: Aug 28 – Dec 20, 2019
  • Class Meetings:

LSHV-982-01

MALS Thesis Writing (HT)

Note: Pre-req 27 earned credits and satisfactory in MALS Thesis Proposal. Thesis Writing not repeatable. Mentor and Dean thesis approval due Nov. 1, 2017. Course certifies 1/2 time status. No scheduled classes.

  • Course #: LSHV-982-01
  • CRN: 32502
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Sullivan, R.
  • Dates: Aug 28 – Dec 20, 2019
  • Class Meetings:

LSHV-368-01

Security and Development

This course will examine a selected set of critical interrelated subjects and current issues that lie at the security-development nexus, from historical-empirical, analytical, policy, and moral perspectives. Consistent with the foregoing LSP goals, the required reading assignments, class discussions, and major research paper(s) seek to foster analytical thinking, comparative study, interdisciplinarity, and humanistic values-based assessments of the nettlesome security-development nexus in global perspective, particularly in developing countries and the related policies pursued by their governments and external actors.

  • Course #: LSHV-368-01
  • CRN: 36906
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Smaldone, J.
  • Dates: Aug 28 – Dec 20, 2019
  • Class Meetings:
    • Mon 6:30 PM - 9:30 PM, Reiss, Room 262
  • Syllabus: Download

LSHV-476-01

The GlobalSouth:Pltcs,Lit,Film

This course looks at the geographical, cultural, and political notion of a "Global South" through the lens of literature and film. The term "Global South" is a geographical reference to regions that have large inequalities in living standards, life expectancy, and access to resources. However, should the Global South just be reduced to a metaphor for underdevelopment? What are some of the ways in which the Global South is represented in literature and film? In particular, I would focus on the following regions: the Caribbean, Africa, South Asia, and Oceania. Some of the authors I would consider are: Jamaica Kincaid, V.S. Naipaul, Salman Rushdie, Arvind Adiga, Witi Ihimaera, J. M. Coetzee, among others.

  • Course #: LSHV-476-01
  • CRN: 36552
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Goswami, S.
  • Dates: Aug 28 – Dec 20, 2019
  • Class Meetings:
  • Syllabus: Download

LSHV-420-01

Utopia and the Future

What do the films Black Panther (2018), Akira (1988) and Metropolis (1927) have in common? How is dark world of The Handmaid’s Tale related to Pixar’s comedy Wall-E? This interdisciplinary course will seek to understand and analyze human visions of our planet’s future. Philosophers, priests and artists have long speculated about the nature of the “perfect society,” how to achieve it and where to find it. We will move between history, literature, political theory, cinema and urban studies to explore contesting visions of Utopia. Although ancient authors long discussed the idea, an Englishman Sir Thomas More gave a name to the ideal society that has now become part of our common language: utopia. In the 503 years since More’s book Utopia appeared, changes in human history, including enormous advances in science and technology, the spread of liberal democracy, the challenges of climate change and globalization, have radically altered the deployment of the word. How can we understand this concept in the 21st century? How has it been articulated in non-Western worlds? And do we still need Utopia? Particular attention will be paid to feminist works as well as Russian and Japanese traditions.

  • Course #: LSHV-420-01
  • CRN: 36656
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Tiwari, B.
  • Dates: Aug 28 – Dec 20, 2019
  • Class Meetings:
  • Syllabus: Download