Bachelor of Arts in Liberal Studies

On-Campus Course Schedule for Fall 2022

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BLHS-010-01

Religion and the Word

Note: This course meets either the Culture or Humanities Core Area requirement and a Humanities concentration requirement.

  • Course #: BLHS-010-01
  • CRN: 42190
  • Instructor: Jensen, J.
  • Dates: Aug 24 – Dec 17, 2022
  • Class Meetings:
    • Thu 5:20 PM - 7:50 PM
  • Syllabus: Download

BLHS-462-01

A Post-Truth World

Manufactured skepticism towards academic knowledge and professional expertise allows spin, propaganda, and disinformation to disseminate widely, promoting a cacophony of ideological agendas. There is nothing new about this situation; since the mid-twentieth century, there have been warnings about “The Death of the Academy”; “The Disappearance of the Public Intellectual”; “The Decline of Professionalism”; and so forth. A tide of cynicism and surrender has enveloped public attitudes towards social media, civic institutions, and science, and many are dubious about sustaining a focus on truth. Blame has been placed on the relativism of the radical Left, the anti-objectivism of postmodernism, the dogmatism of conservatism, the degeneration of social media, the politicization of fake news, and the hyper-skepticism towards science. Where is truth still to be found? The further question comes to mind: did “the truth” ever really matter that much? Perhaps we need to adjust to life in our “post truth” world. Several disciplinary areas from the humanities are consulted in this course: history, culture criticism, literature, science studies, communication studies, media ethics, professional ethics, and political philosophy. This course will be writing intensive, requiring types of composition appropriate for a journalistic exposé, an opinionated blog, a policy brief, an analytical essay, and a research paper.

Note: This course meets either the Humanities or Writing Core Area requirement.

  • Course #: BLHS-462-01
  • CRN: 42191
  • Instructor: Shook, J.
  • Dates: Aug 24 – Dec 17, 2022
  • Class Meetings:
    • Thu 5:20 PM - 7:50 PM
  • Syllabus: Download

BLHS-227-101

Business Statistics

This course will introduce students to elementary statistics for business. Students will learn the foundational concepts of probability, descriptive statistics, and inferential statistics, and they will learn the standard techniques that are used to analyze statistical data in a business environment.

Note: This course is required for the Business and Entrepreneurship concentration.

  • Course #: BLHS-227-101
  • CRN: 40083
  • Instructor: Paasch, J.
  • Dates: Aug 24 – Dec 17, 2022
  • Syllabus: Download

BLHS-228-101

Financial Management

This course introduces the theory and practice of corporate financial management and the application of financial management techniques to business decision-making. Topics include financial statement analysis, financial ratio analysis, the time value of money, risk and return, capital budgeting, cost of capital, sources and uses of financing, and international markets. Students will learn about data security standards, the importance of data anonymization and methods to identify and prevent insider threats.

Note: This online course is required for the Business and Entrepreneurship concentration.

  • Course #: BLHS-228-101
  • CRN: 41138
  • Instructor: O'Connor, C.
  • Dates: Aug 24 – Dec 17, 2022
  • Syllabus: Download

BLHS-031-01

Fndmntl Concepts of Modern Sci

This course will help students grasp fundamental scientific concepts developed over more than eight hundred years; these concepts are essential in the understanding of our contemporary world. The students will also have an opportunity to understand how and when the so-called “conflict between science and religion” originated and its evolution through the Galileo conflict until present. Through classroom lectures and discussions, reading assignments, student presentations and issues debates, we will address the complex evolution of arguments at every step of discoveries of scientific concepts about our world and Church’s interpretation of them and in the process we will review and gain appreciation of one of the most exciting intellectual endeavors ever. This extraordinary display of substantive and original ideas which this debate generated for centuries continues today and allows us to enrich the understanding of our present universe from the smallest subatomic particle to the Big Bang expansion of the cosmos and challenges us to make our own judgment about the meaning of it all.

Note: This synchronous online course meets the Natural Sciences core area requirement. Students are required to attend all weekly online class sessions held via the Zoom conference platform.

  • Course #: BLHS-031-01
  • CRN: 36881
  • Instructor: Cautis, D.
  • Dates: Aug 24 – Dec 17, 2022
  • Class Meetings:
    • Tue 5:30 PM - 8:00 PM
  • Syllabus: Download

BLHV-280-01

International Law

This course is designed to provide students with their first exposure to International Law. It will provide a comprehensive overview of the subject, focusing on history, theory, and the structure of international legal obligation and legal operation, as well as on specialized regimes and contemporary challenges. Where relevant and as much as possible, the course will draw on current events to offer and provoke critical analysis of complex international issues. This course will be of particular interest to those students interested in global affairs and international relations, and in pursuing further studies in law.

Note: This synchronous online course satisfies either a Writing or Social Sciences Core Area requirement or an International Relations concentration requirement. Students are required to attend all weekly online class sessions held via the Zoom conference platform.

  • Course #: BLHV-280-01
  • CRN: 42603
  • Instructors: Buckley, W. , Lewis, P.
  • Dates: Aug 24 – Dec 17, 2022
  • Class Meetings:
    • Tue 5:30 PM - 8:00 PM
  • Syllabus: Download

BLHV-282-101

Political Theory

For four thousand years, solutions for practical problems in communities (“polis”=cities) have prompted reflection (“theoria”) that accelerated after the pre-modern emergence of competing territorial central European “nation-states”. What is the history and future of political institutions for SCS students specially selected to be promising leaders in a national and global capital like DC, attending the world’s flagship Jesuit University which embodies social justice (among 500 globally and 27 nationally)? You encounter an evolving six trillion dollar worldwide war on terror, an emerging global pandemic of 8.5 million, 450k deaths, 118k in the USA, 270 million global migrants and mass mobilizations of protest in 2000 cities and towns in the USA and sixty nations, against racism, violence, police brutality and for justice and equity for peoples of color, especially “Black Lives Matter”. What common toolboxes of tools can help? This course covers key historical figures, political institutions and processes with main examples focusing on USA national and local government and examples from around the world. Students reflect on their actual or proposed professional experiences within the nation’s capital, nationally and globally. The course is designed to engage highly motivated and talented students who wish to move on to careers in the public or private sector, government consulting, electoral politics, lobbying, homeland security or further academic study. Weekly readings, videos, lectures, posts and class time cover the historic legacy of political philosophy, basic principles of the national government: structure, powers and operations of Congress; the presidency and the Supreme Court, the bureaucracy; citizenship, elections, public opinion, justice system, media studies, political parties, lobbying, civil rights movements and pressure groups—with their theoretical roots (Premoderns; Plato, Aristotle; Moderns; Hobbes, Rousseau, Locke, Hegel, Marx, Fascism; colonialism; Achebe, Baldwin; postcolonialism, Orientalism and representation; Fanon, Said; Postmodernity/consumerism; Jameson; gendering of citizenship in four feminist waves; critical race theory, Hooks; intersectionality-Crenshaw; LGBTQ, Black, Latinx, Chicanx, Asian, etc). Why does this matter? Today some 190 geographic, political entities called “states” and those sharing a cultural identity called “nations”, include some 87 democracies of different kinds for nearly half the world’s population, amidst global demands in industrializing and post-industrializing regions for “greater democracy” for all citizens “created equal,” whether or not they live in official democracies.

Note: This course meets the Culture Core Area requirement and is also required for the International Relations concentration.

  • Course #: BLHV-282-101
  • CRN: 40861
  • Instructor: Buckley, W.
  • Dates: Aug 24 – Dec 17, 2022
  • Syllabus: Download

BLHS-424-101

Project Management

This course provides an overview of the theory and practice of managing any project in any organization. The fundamental building blocks of project management are addressed, including project planning, organizing, team building, and effective control mechanisms. Students gain a solid understanding and foundation to successfully manage each phase of the project life cycle, work within organizational and cost constraints, set goals linked directly to stakeholder needs, and utilize proven project management tools to complete the project on time and within budget. Students apply the essential concepts, processes, and techniques that are used in the management of large scale governmental or commercial programs. The key management aspects and proven techniques that differentiate project management from other types of management are fully examined. This course can be used to satisfy the education requirements needed to take the Project Management Professional (PMP) Exam or the Certified Associate in Project Management (CAPM) Exam.

Note: This online course meets the Social Science Core Area requirement and a Business and Entrepreneurship concentration elective requirement.

  • Course #: BLHS-424-101
  • CRN: 40084
  • Instructor: Moschoglou, G.
  • Dates: Aug 24 – Dec 17, 2022
  • Syllabus: Download

BLHS-061-01

The Human Condition

What makes us human? How much of this is a part of our “nature” (e.g., biological hardware, chemistry, and physiological changes) and how much of it is due to how we are nurtured (our socialization, cultures, and social interactions)? This course explores some of the most central aspects of the human condition and asks, “What makes us tick?” The class explores competing paradigms derived from a combination of studies and research from biology, medicine, psychology, sociology, economics, anthropology, archaeology, and historical observation. The structure of the course is inspired by the concept of a “hierarchy of needs”—beginning with essential “lower order” aspects of the human condition moving up toward the problems and issues that are more often the focus of life once the essentials of life have been obtained. The course challenges the notion that 21st century human beings are all that different from those that existed in 100, 1,000, or even 10,000 years ago. It also seeks to understand how human behavior can vary so much across cultures now. Reading material for the course also includes a combination of original source excerpts from the world’s religious and legal texts, and philosophers and scientists such as John Locke, René Descartes, B.F. Skinner, John Watson, Sigmund Freud, Karl Marx, Charles Darwin, Adam Smith, Sun Tzu, Niccolò Machiavelli, Edward O. Wilson. Lecture and the course readings are supplemented with suggested journal articles including current research as well as multimedia excerpts on each week’s topics.

Note: This course meets the Culture and Social Sciences Core Area requirements and a Humanities Concentration Elective requirement.

  • Course #: BLHS-061-01
  • CRN: 36922
  • Instructor: Gray, M.
  • Dates: Aug 24 – Dec 17, 2022
  • Class Meetings:
    • Wed 5:20 PM - 7:50 PM
  • Syllabus: Download

BLHS-061-02

The Human Condition

What makes us human? How much of this is a part of our “nature” (e.g., biological hardware, chemistry, and physiological changes) and how much of it is due to how we are nurtured (our socialization, cultures, and social interactions)? This course explores some of the most central aspects of the human condition and asks, “What makes us tick?” The class explores competing paradigms derived from a combination of studies and research from biology, medicine, psychology, sociology, economics, anthropology, archaeology, and historical observation. The structure of the course is inspired by the concept of a “hierarchy of needs”—beginning with essential “lower order” aspects of the human condition moving up toward the problems and issues that are more often the focus of life once the essentials of life have been obtained. The course challenges the notion that 21st century human beings are all that different from those that existed in 100, 1,000, or even 10,000 years ago. It also seeks to understand how human behavior can vary so much across cultures now. Reading material for the course also includes a combination of original source excerpts from the world’s religious and legal texts, and philosophers and scientists such as John Locke, René Descartes, B.F. Skinner, John Watson, Sigmund Freud, Karl Marx, Charles Darwin, Adam Smith, Sun Tzu, Niccolò Machiavelli, Edward O. Wilson. Lecture and the course readings are supplemented with suggested journal articles including current research as well as multimedia excerpts on each week’s topics.

  • Course #: BLHS-061-02
  • CRN: 43202
  • Instructor: Gray, M.
  • Dates: Aug 24 – Dec 17, 2022
  • Class Meetings:
    • Wed 5:20 PM - 7:50 PM

BLHV-235-101

The Role of U.S. in the World

Note: This course meets either the Social Science or Writing Core Area requirement and an International Relations concentration elective.


BLHV-349-101

Thesis Writing

Students work with the thesis advisor to begin constructing the framework for the proposed thesis.

  • Course #: BLHV-349-101
  • CRN: 42948
  • Instructor: Kessler, M.
  • Dates: Aug 24 – Dec 17, 2022

BLHV-301-01

Independent Study

  • Course #: BLHV-301-01
  • CRN: 43044
  • Instructor: Kralovec, P.
  • Dates: Aug 24 – Dec 17, 2022
  • Class Meetings: