Course Schedule for Summer 2020


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BLHV-461-40

American Presidents and Foreign Policy

This course will focus on the challenges and responsibilities that modern American presidents and their secretaries of state have faced with regard to the creation and execution of U.S. foreign policy. The course will provide an insider’s perspective on how major international events shape foreign policy, and explore the presidential decision-making process during crisis situations. The classes will examine the evolution of America’s leadership role in the world since the end of World War II. Students will also evaluate the effects that the Internet, the 24-hour news cycle, and instant communication between world leaders have on foreign policy. This course will cover current events, concentrate on unfolding international issues and conflicts, and engage in critical analysis of contemporary U.S. foreign policy. The course will also examine the impact of American domestic politics on presidents and their U.S. foreign policy decisions; the battle between isolationism and interventionism; and the struggle between global social justice concerns and political self-interests.

Note: This course meets an International Relations concentration elective requirement.

  • Course #: BLHV-461-40
  • CRN: 17648
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Russo, P.
  • Dates: May 18 – Aug 16, 2020
  • Class Meetings:
  • Syllabus: Download

BLHS-103-40

Biblical Literature and the Ancient World

This course studies Biblical literature in the social, political, and religious context of the ancient Mediterranean world. It begins with a historical overview that is careful to map it onto the "Greeks and Romans" course so that students will be oriented historically and geographically and see the overlap. It traces the history (including prehistory) of ancient Hebrews, the emergence of Christianity, the early relationship between Judaism and Christianity, and the struggle for Christianity to define itself in the Roman Empire before it became for all practical purposes the official religion of the Roman Empire. Segment 1: Hebrew Scripture: Text and Context This segment introduces the student to the literature of ancient Judaism, which eventually was collected in the Hebrew Bible. The segment's chronological framework extends from the formation of ancient Israel in the land of Canaan down to the emergence of Hellenistic Judaism in the post-Exilic age. Within that framework, the segment will cover the pre-history of ancient Israel as a people developing among its neighbors in the ancient Near East. Likewise will it consider the pre-literary and literary history of biblical texts. Attention to genre, literary form, and the redaction of biblical texts will comprise the main part of the segment. Consideration of relevant archeological discoveries will show the relationship between material and literary culture in ancient Israel. Towards this end, various literary and historical methods of biblical study will help the student to apprehend the biblical texts themselves, set against the religious, social, and political history of ancient Israel. Segment 2: New Testament: Text and Context This segment introduces the student to the literature of early Christianity, which eventually was collected in the New Testament. Restricting itself to the time between 50-110 CE, the chronological framework of the course is co-terminus with the time of the production of New Testament texts. These writings will be examined according to their genre, literary forms, and historical context. To that end, the history of the earliest Christian communities will be recovered from these texts to the extent that that can be reasonably done. For example, the establishment, growth and maintenance of communities of Pauline Christians will be apprehended from a careful chronological examination of Paul's Letters. The Gospels will yield valuable information for understanding the earliest Jesus movement and the handing on of its tradition to the later communities for which those Gospels were composed. The relevant historical context of the Greco-Roman period, as that has affected the formation of earliest Christianity and its literature, will also be considered. Segment 3: Religions in the Roman Empire (ca. second through the fifth centuries CE) This segment studies the struggle of early Christians to define themselves and the

Note: This course is required in the old curriculum but is open to all students.

  • Course #: BLHS-103-40
  • CRN: 17818
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Jensen, J.
  • Dates: May 18 – Aug 16, 2020
  • Class Meetings:
    • Thu 5:30 PM - 9:50 PM

BLHS-415-40

China's Rise to Global Power

Will the 21st century be China’s century? Are we headed for a Chinese-led global order? Conflicting opinions abound on what the future holds for China, but key elements of the present picture are not in doubt: one, China is the leading economy in Asia, the world’s most dynamic region, accounting for about 60% of global growth; two, China is following a clear strategy to promote innovative technologies at home and extend its business, trade, and investment interests abroad both regionally and globally; and, three, understanding China with its unique development path, rapid transformation, and expanding presence worldwide is essential for all Americans, particularly next-generation job seekers in a range of fields from cybersecurity to law, business, IT services and emerging technologies such as AI and robotics. “China’s Rise” helps explain China beyond the headlines: how its economy grew so big so fast, what is distinctive about its policies, practices, and institutions today, and whether China can sustain economic momentum in the face of increased pressure from the United States in the years ahead.

Note: This course meets one regional requirement in the International Relations concentration, a Social Sciences Core Area requirement or a Business and Entrepreneurship concentration elective requirement in the new curriculum and a Non-Western requirement in the old curriculum.

  • Course #: BLHS-415-40
  • CRN: 17645
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Harrell, P.
  • Dates: May 18 – Aug 16, 2020
  • Class Meetings:
  • Syllabus: Download

BLHS-316-140

Cosmos and Consciousness

Note: This course is closed to PJI students.

  • Course #: BLHS-316-140
  • CRN: 18042
  • Format: Online
  • Instructor: TBA, S.
  • Dates: May 18 – Aug 16, 2020

BLHS-315-140

Global Political Systems

Note: This course is closed to PJI students.

  • Course #: BLHS-315-140
  • CRN: 18041
  • Format: Online
  • Instructor: Binev, B.
  • Dates: May 18 – Aug 16, 2020

BLHS-221-40

The History of Mass Media in America

This course provides an historical overview of American mass media beginning with the advent of the colonial newspaper, and then surveying the rise of radio, television and film through the 20th century. There will be an emphasis on the early roots of journalism, and technological and social developments of communications systems and their impact on American culture. Students will also consider contemporary trends and conflicts, particularly those that concern the press.

Note: This course is a core requirement in the Professional Media and Communication concentration.

  • Course #: BLHS-221-40
  • CRN: 17642
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Pieto, R.
  • Dates: May 18 – Aug 16, 2020
  • Class Meetings:
  • Syllabus: Download

BLHS-226-141

Intro to Entrepreneurship

This course will examine the phenomenon of innovation in the business setting. How do business leaders get new ideas and implement them? What are the hurdles to innovation and how do successful entrepreneurs overcome them? Through case studies and discussion of the theory of entrepreneurship, students will assess and develop their own abilities to be entrepreneurs.Required course for Entrepreneurship concentration.

Note: This is a closed study opportunity and is not avaiable for individual registration.

  • Course #: BLHS-226-141
  • CRN: 17965
  • Format: Online
  • Instructor: JABARA, J.
  • Dates: May 18 – Aug 16, 2020

BLHS-226-140

Intro to Entrepreneurship

This course will examine the phenomenon of innovation in the business setting. How do business leaders get new ideas and implement them? What are the hurdles to innovation and how do successful entrepreneurs overcome them? Through case studies and discussion of the theory of entrepreneurship, students will assess and develop their own abilities to be entrepreneurs.Required course for Entrepreneurship concentration.

Note: This course meets a Business and Entrepreneurship Concentration requirement.

  • Course #: BLHS-226-140
  • CRN: 17643
  • Format: Online
  • Instructor: JABARA, J.
  • Dates: May 18 – Aug 16, 2020
  • Syllabus: Download

BLHV-274-140

Politics of Terrorism

How do bullets and ballots affect each other? This course explores the reality and interpretations of terrorism(s), Torture, Drones, and Humanitarian Interventions focusing on their role(s) in the forthcoming American national election by means of readings, lectures, media, research and focused discussions. Close examination of the political lessons learned from actual cases, yields different (and sometimes rival) interpretive frameworks. Weekly classroom practice in learning and applying these interpretive skills to our unfolding national elections enables students to gain new insights into the politics of terrorism, here and elsewhere.

Note: This course meets a non-western requirement in the old curriculum and an International Relations elective requirement OR the Writing Core Area requirement in the new curriculum.


BLHS-229-140

Principles of Accounting

Note: This course meets a Business and Entrepreneurship Concentration requirement.


BLHS-313-140

Psychology and Morality

Note: This course is closed to PJI students.

  • Course #: BLHS-313-140
  • CRN: 17984
  • Format: Online
  • Instructor: Miller, J.
  • Dates: May 18 – Aug 16, 2020

BLHS-168-40

Renaissance and Enlightenment

Note: This course meets either BLHS 106 or BLHS 108 in the old curriculum. It does not count for both. In the new curriculum, this course meets the Philosophy or Humanities Core Area or a Humanities Concentration elective. This is a 4 credit course. For students in the new curriculum, the remaining credit can be used as a Humanities concentration credit or a general elective credit.

  • Course #: BLHS-168-40
  • CRN: 17671
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Golden, C.
  • Dates: May 18 – Aug 16, 2020
  • Class Meetings:
  • Syllabus: Download

BLHV-456-40

Sci, Nature & Human Nature

Note: This course meets the Natural Science or Social Sciences Core Area requirement.

  • Course #: BLHV-456-40
  • CRN: 17647
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Shook, J.
  • Dates: May 18 – Aug 16, 2020
  • Class Meetings:
  • Syllabus: Download

BLHS-422-140

Strategy and the Strategic Mindset

Note: This course meets a Philosophy Core Area requirement or a Business and Entrepreneurship Concentration requirement in the new curriculum.

  • Course #: BLHS-422-140
  • CRN: 17646
  • Format: Online
  • Instructor: Paasch, J.
  • Dates: May 18 – Aug 16, 2020
  • Syllabus: Download

BLHS-107-140

The Early Modern World

This course examines the shift from the medieval to the modern, comparing various theories of chronological demarcation and discovering the difficulty of assessing social, political, religious, and literary phenomena. Course focuses on the Reformation, William Shakespeare, and modern science.

Note: This course examines the shift from the medieval to the modern, comparing various theories of chronological demarcation and discovering the difficulty of assessing social, political, religious, and literary phenomena. Course focuses on the Reformation, William Shakespeare, and modern science.

  • Course #: BLHS-107-140
  • CRN: 17857
  • Format: Online
  • Instructor: Golden, C.
  • Dates: May 18 – Aug 16, 2020

BLHS-111-140

The New Millennium

This course must be taken as the student’s final course in the Core in that it draws on all the Core Courses. This is a course on late twentieth- and early twenty-first century America. Its time frame roughly corresponds to the life spans of most BALS students. Its purpose is to help apply the critical approaches they have learned elsewhere to the world in which they live.

Note: For BALS students only.

  • Course #: BLHS-111-140
  • CRN: 17852
  • Format: Online
  • Instructor: Kessler, M.
  • Dates: May 18 – Aug 16, 2020

BLHS-109-40

The Nineteenth Century

This course begins with Romanticism—its critique of the Enlightenment, its insistence that there is more to being human than reason, and its new way of envisioning the relationship between the individual and nature as well as between the individual and society. Romanticism began in Germany at the very end of the 18th century, was brought to England via Coleridge and Wordsworth, and crossed the Atlantic to America.

  • Course #: BLHS-109-40
  • CRN: 17921
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Neimeyer, C.
  • Dates: May 18 – Aug 16, 2020
  • Class Meetings:
    • Mon 5:30 PM - 9:50 PM