Course Schedule for Summer 2017


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BLHS-103-40   Canceled

Biblical Literature and the Ancient World

This course studies Biblical literature in the social, political, and religious context of the ancient Mediterranean world. It begins with a historical overview that is careful to map it onto the "Greeks and Romans" course so that students will be oriented historically and geographically and see the overlap. It traces the history (including prehistory) of ancient Hebrews, the emergence of Christianity, the early relationship between Judaism and Christianity, and the struggle for Christianity to define itself in the Roman Empire before it became for all practical purposes the official religion of the Roman Empire. Segment 1: Hebrew Scripture: Text and Context This segment introduces the student to the literature of ancient Judaism, which eventually was collected in the Hebrew Bible. The segment's chronological framework extends from the formation of ancient Israel in the land of Canaan down to the emergence of Hellenistic Judaism in the post-Exilic age. Within that framework, the segment will cover the pre-history of ancient Israel as a people developing among its neighbors in the ancient Near East. Likewise will it consider the pre-literary and literary history of biblical texts. Attention to genre, literary form, and the redaction of biblical texts will comprise the main part of the segment. Consideration of relevant archeological discoveries will show the relationship between material and literary culture in ancient Israel. Towards this end, various literary and historical methods of biblical study will help the student to apprehend the biblical texts themselves, set against the religious, social, and political history of ancient Israel. Segment 2: New Testament: Text and Context This segment introduces the student to the literature of early Christianity, which eventually was collected in the New Testament. Restricting itself to the time between 50-110 CE, the chronological framework of the course is co-terminus with the time of the production of New Testament texts. These writings will be examined according to their genre, literary forms, and historical context. To that end, the history of the earliest Christian communities will be recovered from these texts to the extent that that can be reasonably done. For example, the establishment, growth and maintenance of communities of Pauline Christians will be apprehended from a careful chronological examination of Paul's Letters. The Gospels will yield valuable information for understanding the earliest Jesus movement and the handing on of its tradition to the later communities for which those Gospels were composed. The relevant historical context of the Greco-Roman period, as that has affected the formation of earliest Christianity and its literature, will also be considered. Segment 3: Religions in the Roman Empire (ca. second through the fifth centuries CE) This segment studies the struggle of early Christians to define themselves and their religion in relation to the Roman Empire, Judaism, and pagan religions. The focus is on particular Christian communities, their differences and commonalities. Emphasis should be on practice, ritual, architecture as much as on texts and the creation of a canon. Credits: 4 Prerequisites: None Course syllabi The following syllabi may help you learn more about this course (login required): Spring '14: Jensen J, Karwowski M (file download) Fall '13: Jensen J, Karwowski M (file download) Fall '13: Lederman R (file download) Additional syllabi may be available in prior academic years.

Note: Core requirement

  • Course #: BLHS-103-40
  • CRN: 11638
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: TBD
  • Dates: May 22 – Aug 20, 2017
  • Class Meetings:
  • Syllabus: Download

BLHS-393-40

China and the Internet: Challenging America in Cyberspace

Note: This course fulfills the non-western requirement Additional 90 min distance learning required

  • Course #: BLHS-393-40
  • CRN: 15964
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Harrell, P.
  • Dates: May 22 – Aug 20, 2017
  • Class Meetings:
  • Syllabus: Download

BLHS-230-140

Church and Science: A Historical Perspective

The overwhelming majority of people today appreciate science and what it brought to mankind from both practical and intellectual points of view. The almost endless stream of amazing scientific discoveries during the last few centuries created the perception of an ongoing upward progression of scientific knowledge since the beginning of historical times. However, the science (as we know it today) is a recent development with historians pointing to the seventeenth century Scientific Revolution in Western Europe as the starting point. This raises a number of interesting questions: why did it happen at that time and place? What factors contributed to it? It turns out that theological and natural philosophy developments within the Catholic Church since the thirteen-century had a significant contribution. This course explores the history of sciences and the relationship with Church theology from the High Middle Ages through modern times. We will review historical developments, which are disproving the myth that Middle Ages were a period of stagnation and lack of scientific progress; quite the contrary it was a time of significant advances including the birth of the scientific methodology, which paved the way for the “Scientific Revolution” of the seventeenth century. Beginning with philosophical foundations and the development of new institutions like the universities and the scientific societies, we move on to study methods in practice across the different fields of mechanical philosophy, and the physical sciences. Students will be introduced first to the works of bishop Grossetese, Roger Bacon and Albertus Magnus who early on were the first ones to develop the basis of the scientific method, emphasizing experimental methods and the role of mathematics in natural philosophy thus starting the intellectual process which eventually lead to the remarkable achievements of Galileo Galilei, Kepler and Isaac Newton. Later on, in the successful march of science, we will analyse how key discoveries/developments of Albert Einstein (relativity theory and cosmology), Niels Bohr and Werner Heisenberg (Quantum Mechanics) will bring to question the limits of understanding, and how changing views of nature have delivered new perspectives on the relationship with church teachings and on what it means to be human. This course will help students grasp fundamental scientific concepts developed over more than eight hundred years; these concepts are essential in the understanding of our contemporary world. The students will also have an opportunity to understand how and when the so-called “conflict between science and religion” originated and its evolution through the Galileo conflict until present times. We will address the complex evolution of arguments at every step of discoveries of scientific concepts about our world and Church’s interpretation of them and in the process we will review and gain appreciation of one of the most exciting intellectual endeavors ever. This extraordinary display of substantive and original ideas which this debate generated for centuries continues today and allows us to enrich the understanding of our present universe from the smallest subatomic particle to the Big Bang expansion of the cosmos and challenges us to make our own judgment about the meaning of it all.

Note: This course meets online

  • Course #: BLHS-230-140
  • CRN: 15962
  • Format: Online
  • Instructor: Cautis, D.
  • Dates: May 22 – Aug 20, 2017
  • Syllabus: Download

BLHS-108-40

Enlightenment, Revolution and Democracy

This course examines the Enlightenment from the particular angle of its relationship to the cultivation of democratic ideals and the emergence of modern democracies. It thus examines issues such as toleration, the rights and responsibilities of the individual, the importance of reason, and the role of religion in society. Segment 1: The Enlightenment This segment naturally has a strong philosophical component, examining such thinkers as Benedict de Spinoza (and other 'free-thinkers'), John Locke on toleration, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Immanuel Kant, and Mary Wollstonecraft. This is something different, however, from a course on modern philosophy. It also explores how the Enlightenment motto "Dare to Know!" reverberated in many areas of society and in many different places and how it was expressed through a variety of genres. Segment 2: The American Revolution Through a variety of genres, this segment explores the revolutionary period in America: the revolutionary promise as experienced and articulated on many levels of society, the impact of the revolution on various levels of society, and the ideals laid out in the Constitution. Segment 3: The French Revolution This segment reflects on debates about the origin of the French Revolution; it follows the course of the revolution itself, including Revolutionary politics, the collapse of the monarchy, and the reign of terror; in considering the aftermath of the revolution, it also treats responses by those in other countries and so anticipates the nineteenth century.

Note: Core requirement. Please note additional 150 minute distance learning component required.

  • Course #: BLHS-108-40
  • CRN: 15546
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Krawczyk, S.
  • Dates: May 22 – Aug 20, 2017
  • Class Meetings:
  • Syllabus: Download

BLHS-105-40   Canceled

Faith and Reason in the Middle Ages

The relation between faith and reason is one of the perennial issues in Western thought. With the renaissance of the twelfth century and the founding of universities throughout Europe in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries, the question of faith and reason was dramatically recast. The rediscovery of Aristotle—and so, the use of Aristotelian logic, grammar, physics, and metaphysics—led to the development of new methods of inquiry, categories of thought, and modes of expression. This course begins with the twelfth-century renaissance; the cross-fertilization among Muslim, Jewish, and Christian scholars; the rise of the universities as important institutions; and the development of scholasticism. It focuses on particular on the development of the scholastic method, resistance to it, and, in particular, discussions and sometimes fierce debates about "faith and reason" in Christianity and Judaism. The course also looks at the issue of authority and alternative approaches to faith and reason (e.g., mystical texts and vernacular theologies), the category of "heresy" and its ramifications (social, political, religious). Segment 1: Scholasticism The focus of this segment is on the universities and scholastic philosophy and theology. It examines stages of development of the scholastic method, with special focus on the role of reason and its relation to faith. The rubric of "Faith and Reason" will be considered both narrowly (explicit discussions of faith and reason) and broadly (how it gets played out in ethics and in discussions of freedom and grace). Students will study particular conflicts in order to appreciate just what was at stake: tensions betweens monastic theology and scholastic theology (e.g., between Bernard of Clairvaux and Peter Abelard), bitter disagreements within the universities (e.g., among various faculties, and/or between Thomas Aquinas and Bonaventure), and struggles of authority between scholastics and their prelates. Segment 2: Vernacular Theology New systems of education in medieval Europe had many social effects, among them growing literacy among the laity. This led to another response to some of the methods and conclusions of scholasticism, especially regarding faith and reason. This segment begins with the "new mysticism" that emerged in the thirteenth century. The focus here is on the texts of male and female mystics whose authority comes not from their office but from "grace"—that is to say, from what is claimed to be a direct gift from God. How did they understand faith and reason? This segment also studies the proliferation of vernacular theologies in the late Middle Ages, their threat to secular and ecclesial authorities, and their role in social transformation. It also looks at the response to such mystics and lay theologians, especially the increased use of the label "heresy" and methods to counter and subdue the so-called "heretics." Segment 3: Judaism This segment of the course studies how Jewish scholars sought to reconcile the philosophic heritage of ancient Greece with Judaism's revealed tradition. The focus here is on the major contributions of the great philosopher-rabbis of the Islamic World (Saadya, Maimonides, Ibn Gabirol, etc.), contrasted with the concepts of piety and Talmudic exegesis developed among the Jews of Northern Europe, and also on the so-called Maimonidean Controversy of the thirteenth century and the burgeoning popularity of mystical thought.

Note: Core requirement

  • Course #: BLHS-105-40
  • CRN: 15567
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: TBD
  • Dates: May 22 – Aug 20, 2017
  • Class Meetings:

BLHS-102-140   Canceled

Greeks and Romans

This course introduces students to the literature and culture of the Greeks and Romans, with particular attention paid to texts whose influence will be seen in later parts of the curriculum. It includes a brief overview of the history and geography of the ancient Mediterranean world and includes some discussion of material culture, but its primary focus is textual. The course aims to introduce students to some of the major genres of writing to come out of the ancient Mediterranean, with special emphasis placed on epic, tragedy, comedy, historiographical prose, and philosophy. Although philosophical texts are taught as a separate segment, they will be read as part of a broader ancient discussion, played out in other genres as well, of questions of justice, freedom, and the like. Given the nature of the texts read, students will require grounding in the basics of ancient Greek and Roman religion and ritual practice. Since this will be one of the first literary courses taken by students, special focus will be placed on close reading and analysis.

Note: Core requirement. Please note this course meets online

  • Course #: BLHS-102-140
  • CRN: 14886
  • Format: Online
  • Instructor: TBD
  • Dates: May 22 – Aug 20, 2017

BLHS-102-40

Greeks and Romans

This course introduces students to the literature and culture of the Greeks and Romans, with particular attention paid to texts whose influence will be seen in later parts of the curriculum. It includes a brief overview of the history and geography of the ancient Mediterranean world and includes some discussion of material culture, but its primary focus is textual. The course aims to introduce students to some of the major genres of writing to come out of the ancient Mediterranean, with special emphasis placed on epic, tragedy, comedy, historiographical prose, and philosophy. Although philosophical texts are taught as a separate segment, they will be read as part of a broader ancient discussion, played out in other genres as well, of questions of justice, freedom, and the like. Given the nature of the texts read, students will require grounding in the basics of ancient Greek and Roman religion and ritual practice. Since this will be one of the first literary courses taken by students, special focus will be placed on close reading and analysis.

Note: Core requirement

  • Course #: BLHS-102-40
  • CRN: 12429
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructors: McNelis, C. , Sens, A.
  • Dates: May 22 – Aug 20, 2017
  • Class Meetings:
    • Tue 5:30 PM - 9:50 PM, Healy, Room 321

BLHV-244-140

International Human Rights Law

This course seeks to help students develop an understanding of the fundamentals of international human rights. It introduces students to the world of human rights generally, and provides students with a foundation upon which to understand the pressing human rights concerns of our time. It is an introduction to international human rights, and applicable hard and soft law instruments will be used to guide this overview. The course will provide a broad survey of the principles of human rights and the spectrum of international standards. It will examine the growth of international humanitarian concern, philosophical issues related to human rights, as well as mechanisms for the implementation of human rights. The Universal Declaration of Human Rights will serve as the primary instrument for the course, but various international conventions and mechanisms, such as the Genocide Convention and the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women will also be studied. Issues relating to women’s rights, racial discrimination, and indigenous peoples, among others, will be discussed, and the ongoing debate between universalism and cultural relativism will run throughout the course. With respect to the universalism/relativism debate, this course asks students to think critically about whether the universality of human rights is necessary or even possible, and whether and to what extent cultural differences should be taken into account. Finally, this course will ask students to look at practical aspects of implementing human rights law on the ground, and to understand both the achievements and limitations of the human rights discourse to date and its prospects for the future. This will include some discussion of international humanitarian law and the law of armed conflict, with respect to the effects of international terrorism on human rights.

Note: This course meets online - fulfills the non-western requirement


BLHS-101-40   Canceled

Introduction to the Social Sciences

What does it mean to be a member of a particular society? How is it that individuals both form and are formed by society? Who exercises power and in what ways? While all Core Courses address these questions in some way, it is especially the social sciences that are designed to explore them in depth. This course introduces students to the basic theories, methods, and particular contributions of anthropology, psychology, and sociology in attempting to answer such questions. It will provide students with a better understanding of the social and cultural worlds they inhabit and offer needed tools for analyzing the material covered in other Core Courses as well.

  • Course #: BLHS-101-40
  • CRN: 14885
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: TBD
  • Dates: May 22 – Aug 20, 2017
  • Class Meetings:
  • Syllabus: Download

BLHS-100-140

Introduction to Ethics

A signature piece of a Jesuit education is the study of Ethics. While all Core Courses explore human values and moral issues in particular historical contexts, in this course students (1) study and critique fundamental moral principles, categories, and terminology drawn from the Western philosophical and religious traditions; (2) examine basic approaches to and recurring debates about perplexing ethical issues; (3) explore through literature central moral quandaries and complexities of human life; and (4) elucidate what is normative in human experience and whence the norms are determined.

Note: Core requirement. Please note this course meets online


BLHS-100-40   Canceled

Introduction to Ethics

A signature piece of a Jesuit education is the study of Ethics. While all Core Courses explore human values and moral issues in particular historical contexts, in this course students (1) study and critique fundamental moral principles, categories, and terminology drawn from the Western philosophical and religious traditions; (2) examine basic approaches to and recurring debates about perplexing ethical issues; (3) explore through literature central moral quandaries and complexities of human life; and (4) elucidate what is normative in human experience and whence the norms are determined.

Note: Core requirement

  • Course #: BLHS-100-40
  • CRN: 14379
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: TBD
  • Dates: May 22 – Aug 20, 2017
  • Class Meetings:
  • Syllabus: Download

BLHV-201-40

Let Them Eat Culture: The History and Politics of Food

Oddly this class is not really about food directly (i.e., no recipes, no cooking, it won’t help you develop a nutrition plan or prepare you for a career in food services!). Yet, it is about how human culture, politics, and well-being have been dramatically affected by our food—how we grow it, sell it, distribute it, and eat it. Homo sapiens have existed for 250,000 years, yet civilization (and written history) emerges only 10,000 years ago. Why? For 240,000 years human beings existed as hunter gatherers chasing their food. It wasn’t until they made a transition to agriculture and domestication of animals for food that they created permanent settlements leading to a division of labor and written language. Throughout history what we eat and how we produce and distribute it has been central to trade, warfare, and the development of social class. Food has spurred political revolutions and has transformed our biological existence—in some cases for the worst and in others for the better. In the 21st century it is easy to take food for granted. Yet we spend 10 percent of each day, on average, consuming food and drink (…even more time earning enough to buy it). We’ve become disconnected from food production; this is the age of the Happy Meal, reheating rather than cooking, and celebrity chefs on multiple TV networks. We’ve forgotten how much time and energy it once took to produce and prepare food. We’ve lost our knowledge of even what is in our food. In this class you will learn about the food we consume now and what we ate in the past and the very real and important consequences of these choices.

Note: Class also meets on Saturday June 10 from 11 AM - 4 PM at Mount Vernon, VA

  • Course #: BLHV-201-40
  • CRN: 13725
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Gray, M.
  • Dates: May 22 – Aug 20, 2017
  • Class Meetings:
  • Syllabus: Download

BLHS-104-40

Medieval Thought and Culture

This course provides an overview of medieval history and the transformations of medieval society, from the waning of the Roman Empire through the fifteenth (and early sixteenth) centuries. The focus is on Western Europe, although attention will be paid to Europeans’ perception of forces, cultures and empires beyond their borders (e.g., the Vikings, the Byzantine Empire, the rise of Islam, etc.). Through a variety of genres (literary, religious, philosophical, and political texts—as well as art and music), this course explores the medieval imagination and the many textures of medieval life and thought.

Note: Core requirement

  • Course #: BLHS-104-40
  • CRN: 14888
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: McNelis, C.
  • Dates: May 22 – Aug 20, 2017
  • Class Meetings:
  • Syllabus: Download

BLHV-261-40   Canceled

Politics and World Religions

Even a cursory glance at world affairs will show that religion is at the heart of today’s ongoing struggle between nations and ideology. Religion may be a motivator and catalyst in rallying popular support for waging war, and in fact may play a significant role in nurturing communal strife among various faith groups in their struggle to achieve governmental control. This course is designed to acquaint students with the analytical study of religion and conflict on the world stage. By design, the course is interdisciplinary, covering areas in religion (theology/philosophy), sociology (ethno-religious & identity conflicts), ethics and politics. Students will have an opportunity to focus on one or more of these areas for their semester paper. This course will help students comprehend the global resurgence of religion in intra-state and international affairs, and will focus on specific areas in the world where religion is the primary issue. Class discussion will address the role religion plays in these conflicts, and offer possible resolutions.

  • Course #: BLHV-261-40
  • CRN: 16127
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: TBD
  • Dates: May 22 – Aug 20, 2017
  • Class Meetings:
  • Syllabus: Download

BLHV-274-140

Politics of Terrorism

How do bullets and ballots affect each other? This course explores the reality and interpretations of terrorism(s), Torture, Drones, and Humanitarian Interventions focusing on their role(s) in the forthcoming American national election by means of readings, lectures, media, research and focused discussions. Close examination of the political lessons learned from actual cases, yields different (and sometimes rival) interpretive frameworks. Weekly classroom practice in learning and applying these interpretive skills to our unfolding national elections enables students to gain new insights into the politics of terrorism, here and elsewhere.

Note: This course meets online - fulfills the non-western requirement


BLHV-278-40   Canceled

Pre-Law: An Introduction to Investing in a Legal Education

Individuals attend law school for a wide variety of reasons. Perhaps your desire to go to law school is a life-long dream or you’ve recently discovered a passion for the law or maybe it’s simply a back-up plan due to the competitive job market that awaits most college graduates. Regardless of why you’re contemplating a legal education, this pre-law course will lay the foundation for you to begin “thinking like a lawyer.” In the beginning of the semester, students will learn about several legal career paths (e.g., litigation, transactional, regulatory, judicial, policy/lobbying, academia, alternative) as well as discuss the pros and cons of becoming a generalist or a specialist while in law school. Students will also acquire a familiarity with and learn to distinguish different types of laws: the U.S. Constitution, federal & state law, case law, statutes, regulations, and treaties. In addition, students will develop the skills needed for a successful 1L year: perform basic legal research, write a legal memorandum, and brief a case using the IRAC method. Finally, students will conduct a self-assessment of their desire to go to law school and research their preferred law schools’ admissions statistics, employment opportunities, tuition costs, areas of specialty, etc. – culminating in an eight to ten page cost/ benefit analysis and reflective essay – to determine whether applying to law school is the most advantageous next step in their education and career path.

  • Course #: BLHV-278-40
  • CRN: 15550
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: TBD
  • Dates: May 22 – Aug 20, 2017
  • Class Meetings:
  • Syllabus: Download

BLHV-424-40   Canceled

Purpose and Personal Mission

Personal development is at the core of leadership development. This course will provide an introduction to cura personalis, the care for the person, as the central framework for understanding and meeting the challenges of personal development. As part of the personal development, the student will be introduced to the process of Examen, which can be useful in discerning one's unique human purpose. This unique human purpose will become the organizing principle for understanding and developing a personal mission statement and the application of that mission to leadership roles.

  • Course #: BLHV-424-40
  • CRN: 15967
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: TBD
  • Dates: May 22 – Aug 20, 2017
  • Class Meetings:
  • Syllabus: Download

BLHV-263-40   Canceled

Religions of India

The course offers an introduction to and an overview of two of the world’s oldest living major religious traditions, Hinduism and Buddhism. Both faiths had their origins on the Indian sub-continent. Hinduism’s roots are to be found among the beliefs and practices of the indigenous peoples of the Indus River valley which are believed to have blended and merged with the beliefs and practices of Aryan tribes migrating into the regions from central Asia during the second Millennium B.C.E. Buddhism arose out of the experiences and teachings of one Siddhartha Gautama, a prince from a Nepalese kingdom, who live c. 563-483 B.C.E. The course focuses on the ancient histories of the two religions and on the development of their doctrines and practices, especially as these are reflected in their sacred scriptures. The latter part of the course will also touch upon modern expressions and practices of the two religions, and their spread and influence outside India, especially in the Western World. There are no prerequisites for this course, and no prior knowledge of Hinduism or Buddhism is assumed.

Note: This course fulfills the non-western requirement

  • Course #: BLHV-263-40
  • CRN: 15485
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: TBD
  • Dates: May 22 – Aug 20, 2017
  • Class Meetings:
  • Syllabus: Download

BLHS-111-40

The New Millennium

This course must be taken as the student’s final course in the Core in that it draws on all the Core Courses. This is a course on late twentieth- and early twenty-first century America. Its time frame roughly corresponds to the life spans of most BALS students. Its purpose is to help apply the critical approaches they have learned elsewhere to the world in which they live.

Note: Core requirement, Please note class will be held at Berkley Center, 3307 M St. NW Suite. 200.

  • Course #: BLHS-111-40
  • CRN: 11637
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Kessler, M.
  • Dates: May 22 – Aug 20, 2017
  • Class Meetings:
  • Syllabus: Download

BLHS-109-40

The Nineteenth Century

This course begins with Romanticism—its critique of the Enlightenment, its insistence that there is more to being human than reason, and its new way of envisioning the relationship between the individual and nature as well as between the individual and society. Romanticism began in Germany at the very end of the 18th century, was brought to England via Coleridge and Wordsworth, and crossed the Atlantic to America.

Note: Core requirement

  • Course #: BLHS-109-40
  • CRN: 13731
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Wackerfuss, A.
  • Dates: May 22 – Aug 20, 2017
  • Class Meetings:
  • Syllabus: Download

BLHV-301-41

Independent Study


BLHV-301-44

Independent Study

  • Course #: BLHV-301-44
  • CRN: 16369
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Buckley, W.
  • Dates: May 22 – Aug 20, 2017
  • Class Meetings:

BLHV-301-20

Independent Study


BLHV-301-43

Independent Study

  • Course #: BLHV-301-43
  • CRN: 16368
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Gray, M.
  • Dates: May 22 – Aug 20, 2017
  • Class Meetings:

BLHV-301-42

Independent Study

  • Course #: BLHV-301-42
  • CRN: 16366
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Jensen, J.
  • Dates: May 22 – Aug 20, 2017
  • Class Meetings:

BLHS-110-40

War and Peace

In this course we analyze problems of war and peace from authoritarian, liberal, and realistic perspectives in the context of some national, ideological, and racial conflicts of the twentieth century. The course has two major components, one theoretical and the other humanist focused on novels, memoirs, historical narrations and films. We will study the views of the influential German jurist and political philosopher Carl Schmitt, a Nazi collaborator, who claims that the concept of enemy is the essence of the political and the ever present possibility of war is a reality humans can only deny hypocritically and are powerless to remove; the opposing view of American philosopher John Rawls who holds that a liberal conception of justice can be the basis for peace between peoples because even illiberal “decent” peoples may use it to solve international conflicts and avoid war; Samuel Huntington´s idea ( The Clash of Civilizations) that conflicts between civilizations will fuel the wars of the 21th century, and Francis Fukuyama´s theory ( The End of History and the Last Man) that the advance of democracy, capitalism, technological skills and science, in a word “globalization” will lead to a peaceful world society he identifies with the end of history.

Note: Core requirement

  • Course #: BLHS-110-40
  • CRN: 11766
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Neimeyer, C.
  • Dates: May 22 – Aug 20, 2017
  • Class Meetings:
  • Syllabus: Download

BLHV-264-40   Canceled

Women in the Bible

This course surveys women in the Bible through the lens of feminist biblical criticism. Using both literary and historical criticism, it will focus on women in the books of Judges, Judith, Miriam, women in the genealogy of Jesus, and named women in the Pauline epistles. It will also explore the reception history of women in the Bible, especially Eve and Mary the mother of Jesus.

Note: This course fulfills the non-western requirement Two additional 105 min. distance learning components.

  • Course #: BLHV-264-40
  • CRN: 16115
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: TBD
  • Dates: May 22 – Aug 20, 2017
  • Class Meetings:
  • Syllabus: Download

BLHS-120-40   Canceled

Writing in an Interdisciplinary Environment

This course is an introduction to writing in an academic context. Attention will be paid not only to mechanics but also to style and modes of argument. Students will read widely and work closely with the instructor on improving their analytical skills, developing and organizing their ideas, and writing clear, persuasive, and lively prose. This course should be taken during a B.A.L.S. student's first two semesters.

Note: Core requirement

  • Course #: BLHS-120-40
  • CRN: 11639
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: TBD
  • Dates: May 22 – Aug 20, 2017
  • Class Meetings:
  • Syllabus: Download

BLHS-120-140

Writing in an Interdisciplinary Environment

This course is an introduction to writing in an academic context. Attention will be paid not only to mechanics but also to style and modes of argument. Students will read widely and work closely with the instructor on improving their analytical skills, developing and organizing their ideas, and writing clear, persuasive, and lively prose. This course should be taken during a B.A.L.S. student's first two semesters.

Note: Core requirement. Please note this course meets online

  • Course #: BLHS-120-140
  • CRN: 16057
  • Format: Online
  • Instructor: Shinn, C.
  • Dates: May 22 – Aug 20, 2017
  • Syllabus: Download