Course Schedule for Summer 2019


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BLHV-402-140

Discovery: The History, Politics, and Future of Human Exploration

This course uses an interdisciplinary approach, incorporating the sciences and the humanities, to explore the history and future of human exploration and discovery. It begins with the most distant story we can tell of early Homo sapiens venturing out of Africa some 60,000 years ago and ends with our reach into space—speculating on the future of human discovery. What are the catalysts for human beings to leave one place for another into the unknown? Often this has come as a response to climate changes, disasters, disease, and/or changes in food sources. In other cases the movement is caused by human conflict, seeking out new wealth and trade, or the development of a new technology that reduces the risks of travel. On some occasions the impetus has been simple human curiosity. In most cases these movements have had lasting effects on human politics and culture. This course takes a global approach—in some cases literally out of this world—to study the causes and effects of these human journeys. It also looks to the future to all that has not yet been explored to answer where we might go next and what impacts this may have. Texts include scientific studies, historical narratives, and primary source documents.

Note: This course is online and non-western.

  • Course #: BLHV-402-140
  • CRN: 17037
  • Format: Online
  • Instructor: Gray, M.
  • Dates: May 20 – Aug 18, 2019

BLHS-105-40

Faith and Reason in the Middle Ages

The relation between faith and reason is one of the perennial issues in Western thought. With the renaissance of the twelfth century and the founding of universities throughout Europe in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries, the question of faith and reason was dramatically recast. The rediscovery of Aristotle—and so, the use of Aristotelian logic, grammar, physics, and metaphysics—led to the development of new methods of inquiry, categories of thought, and modes of expression. This course begins with the twelfth-century renaissance; the cross-fertilization among Muslim, Jewish, and Christian scholars; the rise of the universities as important institutions; and the development of scholasticism. It focuses on the development of the scholastic method, resistance to it, and, in particular, discussions and sometimes fierce debates about "faith and reason" in Christianity and Judaism. The course also looks at the issue of authority and alternative approaches to faith and reason (e.g., mystical texts and vernacular theologies), the category of "heresy" and its ramifications (social, political, religious).

Note: This course counts as a core required course

  • Course #: BLHS-105-40
  • CRN: 15567
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Ray, J.
  • Dates: May 20 – Aug 18, 2019
  • Class Meetings:

BLHS-102-140

Greeks and Romans

This course introduces students to the literature and culture of the Greeks and Romans, with particular attention paid to texts whose influence will be seen in later parts of the curriculum. It includes a brief overview of the history and geography of the ancient Mediterranean world and includes some discussion of material culture, but its primary focus is textual. The course aims to introduce students to some of the major genres of writing to come out of the ancient Mediterranean, with special emphasis placed on epic, tragedy, comedy, historiographical prose, and philosophy. Although philosophical texts are taught as a separate segment, they will be read as part of a broader ancient discussion, played out in other genres as well, of questions of justice, freedom, and the like. Given the nature of the texts read, students will require grounding in the basics of ancient Greek and Roman religion and ritual practice. Since this will be one of the first literary courses taken by students, special focus will be placed on close reading and analysis.

Note: This course counts as a core required course and meets online


BLHS-101-40

Introduction to the Social Sciences

What does it mean to be a member of a particular society? How is it that individuals both form and are formed by society? Who exercises power and in what ways? While all Core Courses address these questions in some way, it is especially the social sciences that are designed to explore them in depth. This course introduces students to the basic theories, methods, and particular contributions of anthropology, psychology, and sociology in attempting to answer such questions. It will provide students with a better understanding of the social and cultural worlds they inhabit and offer needed tools for analyzing the material covered in other Core Courses as well.

Note: This course counts as a core required course

  • Course #: BLHS-101-40
  • CRN: 17020
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructors: Gray, M. , Wiggins, J.
  • Dates: May 20 – Aug 18, 2019
  • Class Meetings:

BLHS-100-40

Introduction to Ethics

A signature piece of a Jesuit education is the study of Ethics. While all Core Courses explore human values and moral issues in particular historical contexts, in this course students (1) study and critique fundamental moral principles, categories, and terminology drawn from the Western philosophical and religious traditions; (2) examine basic approaches to and recurring debates about perplexing ethical issues; (3) explore through literature central moral quandaries and complexities of human life; and (4) elucidate what is normative in human experience and whence the norms are determined.

Note: This course counts as a core required course

  • Course #: BLHS-100-40
  • CRN: 17019
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructors: Buckley, W. , Lewis, P.
  • Dates: May 20 – Aug 18, 2019
  • Class Meetings:

BLHS-104-40

Medieval Thought and Culture

This course provides an overview of medieval history and the transformations of medieval society, from the waning of the Roman Empire through the fifteenth (and early sixteenth) centuries. The focus is on Western Europe, although attention will be paid to Europeans’ perception of forces, cultures and empires beyond their borders (e.g., the Vikings, the Byzantine Empire, the rise of Islam, etc.). Through a variety of genres (literary, religious, philosophical, and political texts—as well as art and music), this course explores the medieval imagination and the many textures of medieval life and thought.

Note: This course counts as a core required course This course provides an overview of medieval history and the transformations of medieval society, from the waning of the Roman Empire through the fifteenth (and early sixteenth) centuries. The focus is on Western Europe, although attention will be paid to Europeans’ perception of forces, cultures and empires beyond their borders (e.g., the Vikings, the Byzantine Empire, the rise of Islam, etc.). Through a variety of genres (literary, religious, philosophical, and political texts—as well as art and music), this course explores the medieval imagination and the many textures of medieval life and thought.

  • Course #: BLHS-104-40
  • CRN: 14888
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: McNelis, C.
  • Dates: May 20 – Aug 18, 2019
  • Class Meetings:

BLHS-111-40

The New Millennium

This course must be taken as the student’s final course in the Core in that it draws on all the Core Courses. This is a course on late twentieth- and early twenty-first century America. Its time frame roughly corresponds to the life spans of most BALS students. Its purpose is to help apply the critical approaches they have learned elsewhere to the world in which they live.

Note: This course counts as a core required course Class will be held at Berkley Center, 3307 M St. NW Suite. 200.

  • Course #: BLHS-111-40
  • CRN: 11637
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Kessler, M.
  • Dates: May 20 – Aug 18, 2019
  • Class Meetings:

BLHS-109-140

The Nineteenth Century

This course begins with Romanticism—its critique of the Enlightenment, its insistence that there is more to being human than reason, and its new way of envisioning the relationship between the individual and nature as well as between the individual and society. Romanticism began in Germany at the very end of the 18th century, was brought to England via Coleridge and Wordsworth, and crossed the Atlantic to America.

Note: This course begins with Romanticism—its critique of the Enlightenment, its insistence that there is more to being human than reason, and its new way of envisioning the relationship between the individual and nature as well as between the individual and society. Romanticism began in Germany at the very end of the 18th century, was brought to England via Coleridge and Wordsworth, and crossed the Atlantic to America.

  • Course #: BLHS-109-140
  • CRN: 13731
  • Format: Online
  • Instructor: Wackerfuss, A.
  • Dates: May 20 – Aug 18, 2019

BLHV-301-45

Independent Study

  • Course #: BLHV-301-45
  • CRN: 17379
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Martinez, K.
  • Dates: May 20 – Aug 18, 2019
  • Class Meetings:

BLHV-301-42

Independent Study

  • Course #: BLHV-301-42
  • CRN: 17376
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: O'Connor, C.
  • Dates: May 20 – Aug 18, 2019
  • Class Meetings:

BLHV-301-44

Independent Study

  • Course #: BLHV-301-44
  • CRN: 17378
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Kelley, H.
  • Dates: May 20 – Aug 18, 2019
  • Class Meetings:

BLHV-301-46

Independent Study

  • Course #: BLHV-301-46
  • CRN: 17380
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Buckley, W.
  • Dates: May 20 – Aug 18, 2019
  • Class Meetings:

BLHV-301-41

Independent Study

  • Course #: BLHV-301-41
  • CRN: 17375
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Gray, M.
  • Dates: May 20 – Aug 18, 2019
  • Class Meetings:

BLHV-301-40

Independent Study

  • Course #: BLHV-301-40
  • CRN: 17374
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Krawczyk, S.
  • Dates: May 20 – Aug 18, 2019
  • Class Meetings:

BLHV-301-43

Independent Study

  • Course #: BLHV-301-43
  • CRN: 17377
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Nan Ellen Nelson
  • Dates: May 20 – Aug 18, 2019
  • Class Meetings:

BLHS-110-40

War and Peace

In this course we analyze problems of war and peace from authoritarian, liberal, and realistic perspectives in the context of some national, ideological, and racial conflicts of the twentieth century. The course has two major components, one theoretical and the other humanist focused on novels, memoirs, historical narrations and films. We will study the views of the influential German jurist and political philosopher Carl Schmitt, a Nazi collaborator, who claims that the concept of enemy is the essence of the political and the ever present possibility of war is a reality humans can only deny hypocritically and are powerless to remove; the opposing view of American philosopher John Rawls who holds that a liberal conception of justice can be the basis for peace between peoples because even illiberal “decent” peoples may use it to solve international conflicts and avoid war; Samuel Huntington´s idea ( The Clash of Civilizations) that conflicts between civilizations will fuel the wars of the 21th century, and Francis Fukuyama´s theory ( The End of History and the Last Man) that the advance of democracy, capitalism, technological skills and science, in a word “globalization” will lead to a peaceful world society he identifies with the end of history.

Note: This course counts as a core required course

  • Course #: BLHS-110-40
  • CRN: 11766
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Neimeyer, C.
  • Dates: May 20 – Aug 18, 2019
  • Class Meetings: