Course Schedule for Spring 2018


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BLHS-103-101

Biblical Literature and the Ancient World

This course studies Biblical literature in the social, political, and religious context of the ancient Mediterranean world. It begins with a historical overview that is careful to map it onto the "Greeks and Romans" course so that students will be oriented historically and geographically and see the overlap. It traces the history (including prehistory) of ancient Hebrews, the emergence of Christianity, the early relationship between Judaism and Christianity, and the struggle for Christianity to define itself in the Roman Empire before it became for all practical purposes the official religion of the Roman Empire. Segment 1: Hebrew Scripture: Text and Context This segment introduces the student to the literature of ancient Judaism, which eventually was collected in the Hebrew Bible. The segment's chronological framework extends from the formation of ancient Israel in the land of Canaan down to the emergence of Hellenistic Judaism in the post-Exilic age. Within that framework, the segment will cover the pre-history of ancient Israel as a people developing among its neighbors in the ancient Near East. Likewise will it consider the pre-literary and literary history of biblical texts. Attention to genre, literary form, and the redaction of biblical texts will comprise the main part of the segment. Consideration of relevant archeological discoveries will show the relationship between material and literary culture in ancient Israel. Towards this end, various literary and historical methods of biblical study will help the student to apprehend the biblical texts themselves, set against the religious, social, and political history of ancient Israel. Segment 2: New Testament: Text and Context This segment introduces the student to the literature of early Christianity, which eventually was collected in the New Testament. Restricting itself to the time between 50-110 CE, the chronological framework of the course is co-terminus with the time of the production of New Testament texts. These writings will be examined according to their genre, literary forms, and historical context. To that end, the history of the earliest Christian communities will be recovered from these texts to the extent that that can be reasonably done. For example, the establishment, growth and maintenance of communities of Pauline Christians will be apprehended from a careful chronological examination of Paul's Letters. The Gospels will yield valuable information for understanding the earliest Jesus movement and the handing on of its tradition to the later communities for which those Gospels were composed. The relevant historical context of the Greco-Roman period, as that has affected the formation of earliest Christianity and its literature, will also be considered. Segment 3: Religions in the Roman Empire (ca. second through the fifth centuries CE) This segment studies the struggle of early Christians to define themselves and the

Note: This course counts as a core requirement and meets online with three mandatory in-class sessions on 1/17, 2/28, and 4/25. Online w/mandatory in-person sessions, on the following Wednesdays from 8:00pm-10:30 pm: 1/17, 2/28, 4/25


BLHS-415-101

China Rise to Econ Power

Will the 21st century be China’s century? Are we headed for a Chinese-led global order? We can’t be sure of that, but three things we know for certain: one, China is the leading economy in Asia, the world’s most dynamic region contributing over 60% of global growth; two, the U.S. and Chinese economies are huge, increasingly competitive, and highly interdependent; and, three, looking beyond conventional wisdom to understand this China with its ever-expanding clout makes obvious sense for Americans seeking next generation jobs in a range of fields from business, alternative energy, and law to cybersecurity, IT services, and cutting edge industries like AI and robotics. In short, China matters. Developing China expertise is essential for all of us. Taught by a longtime China specialist (see faculty bio), “China’s Rise to Economic Power” provides an overview of China’s economic track record over the past seventy years. To get students up to speed on the basics, the course starts with a series of briefings on China today, its geopolitical position, economic trends, and political system. We then examine two key inflection points in China’s economic trajectory: the experiment in central planning, 1949-1979, and the pivot to market socialism, 1980-present, asking in the first instance why China failed to grow and in the second how China grew so big so fast into the world’s second largest economy today. Back to the present, we now delve deeper into some of the topics briefly mentioned at the outset—the rural-urban gap, S&T; policies, the future of the Internet—while also addressing current U.S.-China tensions over trade, market access, cyber issues, North Korea sanctions, and island-building in the South China Sea. We conclude the course with a new look at China’s regional aspirations (Asia for the Asians 2.0), in particular, China’s recent One Belt, One Road initiative to build infrastructure in Central Asia, Southeast Asia, and Africa through investments by Chinese-led banks and regional organizations. Overall, “China’s Rise” aims to help students broaden their view of China’s 21st century economy and think imaginatively about possibilities for constructive U.S.-China engagement in the uncertain years ahead. Note: 1) “China’s Rise to Economic Power” is an online course; it may be taken entirely online. At the same time, six classes (see syllabus for dates) will also be available in-person with the instructor in a 640 Mass Ave classroom. 2) This course fulfills Georgetown’s “non-Western” requirement—or to put it in positive terms since China/Asia accounts for 60% of the world’s population—Georgetown’s Asia requirement.

  • Course #: BLHS-415-101
  • CRN: 33825
  • Format: Online
  • Instructor: Harrell, P.
  • Dates: Jan 10 – May 12, 2018

BLHV-298-101

Cities & Inclusion

This course explores inclusion in cities. It does this in a broad and inter-disciplinary manner, exploring varies concepts, perspectives, and locations, and with a focus on the non-Western world. More specifically, the course asks students to explore the notion of sustainable development and the commitments around the UN Sustainable Development Goals as they pertain to the urban environment, and challenges students to unpack both challenges and opportunities in this regard. The class canvasses issues related to housing, poverty, migration, and gentrification, and investigates the role and relevance of law, the private sector, and social movements.

Note: This course meets online - fulfills the non-western requirement.


BLHS-108-01

Enlightenment, Revolution and Democracy

This course examines the Enlightenment from the particular angle of its relationship to the cultivation of democratic ideals and the emergence of modern democracies. It thus examines issues such as toleration, the rights and responsibilities of the individual, the importance of reason, and the role of religion in society. Segment 1: The Enlightenment This segment naturally has a strong philosophical component, examining such thinkers as Benedict de Spinoza (and other 'free-thinkers'), John Locke on toleration, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Immanuel Kant, and Mary Wollstonecraft. This is something different, however, from a course on modern philosophy. It also explores how the Enlightenment motto "Dare to Know!" reverberated in many areas of society and in many different places and how it was expressed through a variety of genres. Segment 2: The American Revolution Through a variety of genres, this segment explores the revolutionary period in America: the revolutionary promise as experienced and articulated on many levels of society, the impact of the revolution on various levels of society, and the ideals laid out in the Constitution. Segment 3: The French Revolution This segment reflects on debates about the origin of the French Revolution; it follows the course of the revolution itself, including Revolutionary politics, the collapse of the monarchy, and the reign of terror; in considering the aftermath of the revolution, it also treats responses by those in other countries and so anticipates the nineteenth century.

Note: This course counts as a core requirement. This course examines the Enlightenment from the particular angle of its relationship to the cultivation of democratic ideals and the emergence of modern democracies. It thus examines issues such as toleration, the rights and responsibilities of the individual, the importance of reason, and the role of religion in society. Segment 1: The Enlightenment This segment naturally has a strong philosophical component, examining such thinkers as Benedict de Spinoza (and other 'free-thinkers'), John Locke on toleration, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Immanuel Kant, and Mary Wollstonecraft. This is something different, however, from a course on modern philosophy. It also explores how the Enlightenment motto "Dare to Know!" reverberated in many areas of society and in many different places and how it was expressed through a variety of genres. Segment 2: The American Revolution Through a variety of genres, this segment explores the revolutionary period in America: the revolutionary promise as experienced and articulated on many levels of society, the impact of the revolution on various levels of society, and the ideals laid out in the Constitution. Segment 3: The French Revolution This segment reflects on debates about the origin of the French Revolution; it follows the course of the revolution itself, including Revolutionary politics, the collapse of the monarchy, and the reign of terror; in considering the aftermath of the revolution, it also treats responses by those in other countries and so anticipates the nineteenth century.

  • Course #: BLHS-108-01
  • CRN: 28510
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: McKenna, C.
  • Dates: Jan 10 – May 12, 2018
  • Class Meetings:

BLHS-105-01

Faith and Reason in the Middle Ages

The relation between faith and reason is one of the perennial issues in Western thought. With the renaissance of the twelfth century and the founding of universities throughout Europe in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries, the question of faith and reason was dramatically recast. The rediscovery of Aristotle—and so, the use of Aristotelian logic, grammar, physics, and metaphysics—led to the development of new methods of inquiry, categories of thought, and modes of expression. This course begins with the twelfth-century renaissance; the cross-fertilization among Muslim, Jewish, and Christian scholars; the rise of the universities as important institutions; and the development of scholasticism. It focuses on particular on the development of the scholastic method, resistance to it, and, in particular, discussions and sometimes fierce debates about "faith and reason" in Christianity and Judaism. The course also looks at the issue of authority and alternative approaches to faith and reason (e.g., mystical texts and vernacular theologies), the category of "heresy" and its ramifications (social, political, religious). Segment 1: Scholasticism The focus of this segment is on the universities and scholastic philosophy and theology. It examines stages of development of the scholastic method, with special focus on the role of reason and its relation to faith. The rubric of "Faith and Reason" will be considered both narrowly (explicit discussions of faith and reason) and broadly (how it gets played out in ethics and in discussions of freedom and grace). Students will study particular conflicts in order to appreciate just what was at stake: tensions betweens monastic theology and scholastic theology (e.g., between Bernard of Clairvaux and Peter Abelard), bitter disagreements within the universities (e.g., among various faculties, and/or between Thomas Aquinas and Bonaventure), and struggles of authority between scholastics and their prelates. Segment 2: Vernacular Theology New systems of education in medieval Europe had many social effects, among them growing literacy among the laity. This led to another response to some of the methods and conclusions of scholasticism, especially regarding faith and reason. This segment begins with the "new mysticism" that emerged in the thirteenth century. The focus here is on the texts of male and female mystics whose authority comes not from their office but from "grace"—that is to say, from what is claimed to be a direct gift from God. How did they understand faith and reason? This segment also studies the proliferation of vernacular theologies in the late Middle Ages, their threat to secular and ecclesial authorities, and their role in social transformation. It also looks at the response to such mystics and lay theologians, especially the increased use of the label "heresy" and methods to counter and subdue the so-called "heretics." Segment 3: Judaism This segment of

Note: This course counts as a core requirement. The relation between faith and reason is one of the perennial issues in Western thought. With the renaissance of the twelfth century and the founding of universities throughout Europe in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries, the question of faith and reason was dramatically recast. The rediscovery of Aristotle—and so, the use of Aristotelian logic, grammar, physics, and metaphysics—led to the development of new methods of inquiry, categories of thought, and modes of expression. This course begins with the twelfth-century renaissance; the cross-fertilization among Muslim, Jewish, and Christian scholars; the rise of the universities as important institutions; and the development of scholasticism. It focuses on particular on the development of the scholastic method, resistance to it, and, in particular, discussions and sometimes fierce debates about "faith and reason" in Christianity and Judaism. The course also looks at the issue of authority and alternative approaches to faith and reason (e.g., mystical texts and vernacular theologies), the category of "heresy" and its ramifications (social, political, religious). Segment 1: Scholasticism The focus of this segment is on the universities and scholastic philosophy and theology. It examines stages of development of the scholastic method, with special focus on the role of reason and its relation to faith. The rubric of "Faith and Reason" will be considered both narrowly (explicit discussions of faith and reason) and broadly (how it gets played out in ethics and in discussions of freedom and grace). Students will study particular conflicts in order to appreciate just what was at stake: tensions betweens monastic theology and scholastic theology (e.g., between Bernard of Clairvaux and Peter Abelard), bitter disagreements within the universities (e.g., among various faculties, and/or between Thomas Aquinas and Bonaventure), and struggles of authority between scholastics and their prelates. Segment 2: Vernacular Theology New systems of education in medieval Europe had many social effects, among them growing literacy among the laity. This led to another response to some of the methods and conclusions of scholasticism, especially regarding faith and reason. This segment begins with the "new mysticism" that emerged in the thirteenth century. The focus here is on the texts of male and female mystics whose authority comes not from their office but from "grace"—that is to say, from what is claimed to be a direct gift from God. How did they understand faith and reason? This segment also studies the proliferation of vernacular theologies in the late Middle Ages, their threat to secular and ecclesial authorities, and their role in social transformation. It also looks at the response to such mystics and lay theologians, especially the increased use of the label "heresy" and methods to counter and subdue the so-called "heretics." Segment 3: Judaism This segment of

  • Course #: BLHS-105-01
  • CRN: 18328
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Linford, R.
  • Dates: Jan 10 – May 12, 2018
  • Class Meetings:

BLHS-102-01

Greeks and Romans

This course introduces students to the literature and culture of the Greeks and Romans, with particular attention paid to texts whose influence will be seen in later parts of the curriculum. It includes a brief overview of the history and geography of the ancient Mediterranean world and includes some discussion of material culture, but its primary focus is textual. The course aims to introduce students to some of the major genres of writing to come out of the ancient Mediterranean, with special emphasis placed on epic, tragedy, comedy, historiographical prose, and philosophy. Although philosophical texts are taught as a separate segment, they will be read as part of a broader ancient discussion, played out in other genres as well, of questions of justice, freedom, and the like. Given the nature of the texts read, students will require grounding in the basics of ancient Greek and Roman religion and ritual practice. Since this will be one of the first literary courses taken by students, special focus will be placed on close reading and analysis.

Note: This course counts as a core requirement. This course introduces students to the literature and culture of the Greeks and Romans, with particular attention paid to texts whose influence will be seen in later parts of the curriculum. It includes a brief overview of the history and geography of the ancient Mediterranean world and includes some discussion of material culture, but its primary focus is textual. The course aims to introduce students to some of the major genres of writing to come out of the ancient Mediterranean, with special emphasis placed on epic, tragedy, comedy, historiographical prose, and philosophy. Although philosophical texts are taught as a separate segment, they will be read as part of a broader ancient discussion, played out in other genres as well, of questions of justice, freedom, and the like. Given the nature of the texts read, students will require grounding in the basics of ancient Greek and Roman religion and ritual practice. Since this will be one of the first literary courses taken by students, special focus will be placed on close reading and analysis.

  • Course #: BLHS-102-01
  • CRN: 16330
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructors: McNelis, C. , Sens, A.
  • Dates: Jan 10 – May 12, 2018
  • Class Meetings:
    • Tue 6:00 PM - 9:35 PM, Healy, Room 321
  • Syllabus: Download

BLHV-240-01

International Relations for the 21st Century

A Danish newspaper publishes a series of religious cartoons and sparks riots resulting in fatalities in Afghanistan. Live reports from an Arab satellite news service stall a U.S. Marine offensive in Iraq. A Chinese government thriving in a global economy empowered by satellite communications successfully tests an anti-satellite missile and destroys a satellite in orbit. Across Western Europe and the United States, waves of immigration stand to challenge traditional perceptions of national identity, culture and religion in those states. In a world characterized by increasing turbulence and unintended effects, is international behavior simply the sum of random interactions between powers and interests, or can traditional theories of international relations continue to describe, explain and predict events? Confronted with the challenges of nuclear proliferation, persistent global poverty, and environmental degradation, does international relations theory provide any intellectual space for a discussion of ethics in global behavior? This course is designed to provide students with a basic framework for understanding the nature of contemporary international relations. The first part covers the classical theories used for examining the international system (realism, liberalism, idealism, behavioralism). The second part looks at the enduring problems of global security, the problem of war, globalization, and the emerging crises of environmental change and natural resource depletion. Throughout the course, we will take time to discuss the ethical dilemmas we confront when theory meets value-driven national policy. Upon completion, students should be able to identify key concepts, actors, and issues in the modern interstate system and be prepared for advanced coursework in the field of international relations. (Not open to students who have completed BLHV 205.)

Note: This course fulfills the non-western requirement. A Danish newspaper publishes a series of religious cartoons and sparks riots resulting in fatalities in Afghanistan. Live reports from an Arab satellite news service stall a U.S. Marine offensive in Iraq. A Chinese government thriving in a global economy empowered by satellite communications successfully tests an anti-satellite missile and destroys a satellite in orbit. Across Western Europe and the United States, waves of immigration stand to challenge traditional perceptions of national identity, culture and religion in those states. In a world characterized by increasing turbulence and unintended effects, is international behavior simply the sum of random interactions between powers and interests, or can traditional theories of international relations continue to describe, explain and predict events? Confronted with the challenges of nuclear proliferation, persistent global poverty, and environmental degradation, does international relations theory provide any intellectual space for a discussion of ethics in global behavior? This course is designed to provide students with a basic framework for understanding the nature of contemporary international relations. The first part covers the classical theories used for examining the international system (realism, liberalism, idealism, behavioralism). The second part looks at the enduring problems of global security, the problem of war, globalization, and the emerging crises of environmental change and natural resource depletion. Throughout the course, we will take time to discuss the ethical dilemmas we confront when theory meets value-driven national policy. Upon completion, students should be able to identify key concepts, actors, and issues in the modern interstate system and be prepared for advanced coursework in the field of international relations. (Not open to students who have completed BLHV 205.)

  • Course #: BLHV-240-01
  • CRN: 31497
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: McMahon, M.
  • Dates: Jan 10 – May 12, 2018
  • Class Meetings:
  • Syllabus: Download

BLHS-101-01

Introduction to the Social Sciences

What does it mean to be a member of a particular society? How is it that individuals both form and are formed by society? Who exercises power and in what ways? While all Core Courses address these questions in some way, it is especially the social sciences that are designed to explore them in depth. This course introduces students to the basic theories, methods, and particular contributions of anthropology, psychology, and sociology in attempting to answer such questions. It will provide students with a better understanding of the social and cultural worlds they inhabit and offer needed tools for analyzing the material covered in other Core Courses as well.

Note: This course counts as a core requirement. What does it mean to be a member of a particular society? How is it that individuals both form and are formed by society? Who exercises power and in what ways? While all Core Courses address these questions in some way, it is especially the social sciences that are designed to explore them in depth. This course introduces students to the basic theories, methods, and particular contributions of anthropology, psychology, and sociology in attempting to answer such questions. It will provide students with a better understanding of the social and cultural worlds they inhabit and offer needed tools for analyzing the material covered in other Core Courses as well.

  • Course #: BLHS-101-01
  • CRN: 31905
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructors: Gray, M. , Wiggins, J.
  • Dates: Jan 10 – May 12, 2018
  • Class Meetings:
  • Syllabus: Download

BLHS-100-101

Introduction to Ethics

A signature piece of a Jesuit education is the study of Ethics. While all Core Courses explore human values and moral issues in particular historical contexts, in this course students (1) study and critique fundamental moral principles, categories, and terminology drawn from the Western philosophical and religious traditions; (2) examine basic approaches to and recurring debates about perplexing ethical issues; (3) explore through literature central moral quandaries and complexities of human life; and (4) elucidate what is normative in human experience and whence the norms are determined.

Note: This course counts as a core requirement and meets online. Online


BLHS-104-01

Medieval Thought and Culture

This course provides an overview of medieval history and the transformations of medieval society, from the waning of the Roman Empire through the fifteenth (and early sixteenth) centuries. The focus is on Western Europe, although attention will be paid to Europeans’ perception of forces, cultures and empires beyond their borders (e.g., the Vikings, the Byzantine Empire, the rise of Islam, etc.). Through a variety of genres (literary, religious, philosophical, and political texts—as well as art and music), this course explores the medieval imagination and the many textures of medieval life and thought.

Note: This course counts as a core requirement. 150 minute distance learning component required

  • Course #: BLHS-104-01
  • CRN: 25016
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: McNelis, C.
  • Dates: Jan 10 – May 12, 2018
  • Class Meetings:
  • Syllabus: Download

BLHV-274-101

Politics of Terrorism

How do bullets and ballots affect each other? This course explores the reality and interpretations of terrorism(s), Torture, Drones, and Humanitarian Interventions focusing on their role(s) in the forthcoming American national election by means of readings, lectures, media, research and focused discussions. Close examination of the political lessons learned from actual cases, yields different (and sometimes rival) interpretive frameworks. Weekly classroom practice in learning and applying these interpretive skills to our unfolding national elections enables students to gain new insights into the politics of terrorism, here and elsewhere.

Note: This course meets online - fulfills the non-western requirement.


BLHS-107-01

The Early Modern World

This course examines the shift from the medieval to the modern, comparing various theories of chronological demarcation and discovering the difficulty of assessing social, political, religious, and literary phenomena. Course focuses on the Reformation, William Shakespeare, and modern science.

Note: This course counts as a core requirement. This course examines the shift from the medieval to the modern, comparing various theories of chronological demarcation and discovering the difficulty of assessing social, political, religious, and literary phenomena. Course focuses on the Reformation, William Shakespeare, and modern science.

  • Course #: BLHS-107-01
  • CRN: 16333
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Bradford, A.
  • Dates: Jan 10 – May 12, 2018
  • Class Meetings:
  • Syllabus: Download

BLHS-111-01

The New Millennium

This course must be taken as the student’s final course in the Core in that it draws on all the Core Courses. This is a course on late twentieth- and early twenty-first century America. Its time frame roughly corresponds to the life spans of most BALS students. Its purpose is to help apply the critical approaches they have learned elsewhere to the world in which they live.

Note: This course counts as a core requirement. Class will be held at Berkley Center, 3307 M. St. NW, Suite 200.

  • Course #: BLHS-111-01
  • CRN: 16305
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Kessler, M.
  • Dates: Jan 10 – May 12, 2018
  • Class Meetings:
  • Syllabus: Download

BLHS-106-01

The Renaissance

This course focuses on the concerns and practices of Renaissance thinkers, writers, and artists, with particular attention paid to the ways in which they defined their own intellectual and artistic projects and how they situated them vis à vis the antecedent traditions to which they were reacting.

Note: This course counts as a core requirement. Saturdays, Feb 10 & Apr 7, 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM at National Gallery of Art


BLHV-348-01

Thesis Research

Students who are approved for a BALS thesis will take this 0 credit course in preparation for thesis writing.

Note: Students who are approved for a BALS thesis will take this 0 credit course in preparation for thesis writing.


BLHV-349-01

Thesis Writing

Students work with the thesis advisor to begin constructing the framework for the proposed thesis.

  • Course #: BLHV-349-01
  • CRN: 30870
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: TBD
  • Dates: Jan 10 – May 12, 2018
  • Class Meetings:

BLHV-301-06

Independent Study

  • Course #: BLHV-301-06
  • CRN: 35061
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Paasch, J.
  • Dates: Jan 10 – May 12, 2018
  • Class Meetings:

BLHV-301-03

Independent Study

  • Course #: BLHV-301-03
  • CRN: 35058
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Jensen, J.
  • Dates: Jan 10 – May 12, 2018
  • Class Meetings:

BLHV-301-01

Independent Study


BLHV-301-02

Independent Study

  • Course #: BLHV-301-02
  • CRN: 35057
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Bradford, A.
  • Dates: Jan 10 – May 12, 2018
  • Class Meetings:

BLHV-301-05

Independent Study

  • Course #: BLHV-301-05
  • CRN: 35060
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Kelley, H.
  • Dates: Jan 10 – May 12, 2018
  • Class Meetings:

BLHV-301-04

Independent Study

  • Course #: BLHV-301-04
  • CRN: 35059
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Gray, M.
  • Dates: Jan 10 – May 12, 2018
  • Class Meetings:

BLHV-301-10

Independent Study

  • Course #: BLHV-301-10
  • CRN: 35094
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Wackerfuss, A.
  • Dates: Jan 10 – May 12, 2018
  • Class Meetings:

BLHV-301-07

Independent Study

  • Course #: BLHV-301-07
  • CRN: 35090
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: McKenna, C.
  • Dates: Jan 10 – May 12, 2018
  • Class Meetings:

BLHV-301-09

Independent Study

  • Course #: BLHV-301-09
  • CRN: 35093
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Neimeyer, C.
  • Dates: Jan 10 – May 12, 2018
  • Class Meetings:

BLHV-301-08

Independent Study

  • Course #: BLHV-301-08
  • CRN: 35092
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Kessler, M.
  • Dates: Jan 10 – May 12, 2018
  • Class Meetings:

BLHV-301-11

Independent Study

  • Course #: BLHV-301-11
  • CRN: 35095
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Martinez, K.
  • Dates: Jan 10 – May 12, 2018
  • Class Meetings:

BLHS-110-01

War and Peace

In this course we analyze problems of war and peace from authoritarian, liberal, and realistic perspectives in the context of some national, ideological, and racial conflicts of the twentieth century. The course has two major components, one theoretical and the other humanist focused on novels, memoirs, historical narrations and films. We will study the views of the influential German jurist and political philosopher Carl Schmitt, a Nazi collaborator, who claims that the concept of enemy is the essence of the political and the ever present possibility of war is a reality humans can only deny hypocritically and are powerless to remove; the opposing view of American philosopher John Rawls who holds that a liberal conception of justice can be the basis for peace between peoples because even illiberal “decent” peoples may use it to solve international conflicts and avoid war; Samuel Huntington´s idea ( The Clash of Civilizations) that conflicts between civilizations will fuel the wars of the 21th century, and Francis Fukuyama´s theory ( The End of History and the Last Man) that the advance of democracy, capitalism, technological skills and science, in a word “globalization” will lead to a peaceful world society he identifies with the end of history.

Note: This course counts as a core requirement.

  • Course #: BLHS-110-01
  • CRN: 16334
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Neimeyer, C.
  • Dates: Jan 10 – May 12, 2018
  • Class Meetings:

BLHS-120-101

Writing in an Interdisciplinary Environment

This course is an introduction to writing in an academic context. Attention will be paid not only to mechanics but also to style and modes of argument. Students will read widely and work closely with the instructor on improving their analytical skills, developing and organizing their ideas, and writing clear, persuasive, and lively prose. This course should be taken during a B.A.L.S. student's first two semesters.

Note: This course counts as a core requirement and meets online.

  • Course #: BLHS-120-101
  • CRN: 33824
  • Format: Online
  • Instructor: Shinn, C.
  • Dates: Jan 10 – May 12, 2018