Course Schedule for Fall 2019


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BLHS-032-101   NEW!

BioTech and Global Health

Following abuses such as World War II Nazi medical experiments on prisoners, and four decades of not treating men of color for syphilis at Tuskegee (1932-1972), in the early 1970’s, a government commission established guidelines for human subject research (Belmont, 1974-1979). This “bedside model” emphasizing autonomous (self-directed) patient consent became a quest for public agreement about procedures of sound clinical decision-making in the face of discrete uses or withholding/withdrawals of technology. These helped decisions about organ donation and neonatal intensive care (exploring rules such as justice, benefice and nonmalficence or “do no harm”). This pursuit energized a new discipline of “Bioethics” for nearly half a century, pioneered by distinguished colleagues at Georgetown University’s Kennedy Center of Bioethics. Such guidelines are now being enhanced by bigger social issues in biotechnology and global health such as the role of social and environmental contexts in enhancing the negative effects of disease interactions (“syndemics” such as diabetes-depression and poverty). These are now under investigation by nationally renowned Georgetown scholars in Global Health (colleague Prof. Mendenhall). In addition, this course explores benefits in patient care and public health that come from information engineering applied to the field of health care (health informatics) that have helped promote a century of improvements in sanitation and wellness (e.g. reproductive, maternal and children’s health) and technological gains in diagnosis and treatment of diseases; sanitation halted typhoid, cholera, and dysentery. Vaccinations stopped smallpox and polio. Prevention and intervention have helped with diabetes, cancers, heart disease, neurogenerative diseases such as depression, HIV/AIDS and Opioid dependencies. Such knowledge reduces premature mortality (years of life lost), disability (YLD), summarized as disability adjusted life years (DALY, According to the World Health Organization, WHO). This course surveys these issues and enables understanding intersections among “Biotechnology” and “Global Health”. Related resources for our course include materials from GU’s School of Nursing, Medical School and Science, Technology, and International Affairs (STIA) Program in the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service.

Note: This course meets the Natural Science Core Area requirement and an International Relations Concentration Elective requirement. This course also meets the Non-Western requirement under the old curriculum.


BLHS-414-01

Cyber Ops and Global Politics

Networks around the world are under constant assault and threatened by hackers who want to steal information or cause harm. By looking at cyber intelligence and the domestic and international goals of governments, policymakers can develop better policies, make improved resource investment decisions, and make more complete risk management decisions. This course will focus on building an understanding of how cyber operations are used by governments to achieve domestic or international goals. We will investigate the use of cyber operations as a tool of statecraft and the options it provides leaders in achieving foreign and domestic goals. Unclear norms of behavior about the use of cyber operations and uncertainty over acceptable responses mean governments should be prepared for uncertainty and a complication of traditional international relations. We will examine the cyber operations of various countries to see the context, drivers, and goals for their actions. Students will learn how using cyber intelligence can drive global politics, international policies, and cyber security decisions. Coursework will focus on looking at cyber operations through the lens of international relations. Throughout the course we will compare the use of cyber operations with traditional foreign policy tools and examine the emerging use of cyber technologies to achieve national goals. The course will emphasize how strategic cyber intelligence can improve risk management decisions and assist policymakers in setting effective policies.

Note: This course meets the International Relations concentration, Individual Study concentration general elective requirements and a non-western requirement.

  • Course #: BLHS-414-01
  • CRN: 36883
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Klein, R.
  • Dates: Aug 28 – Dec 20, 2019
  • Class Meetings:
  • Syllabus: Download

BLHS-108-101

Enlightenment, Revolution and Democracy

This course examines the Enlightenment from the particular angle of its relationship to the cultivation of democratic ideals and the emergence of modern democracies. It thus examines issues such as toleration, the rights and responsibilities of the individual, the importance of reason, and the role of religion in society. Segment 1: The Enlightenment This segment naturally has a strong philosophical component, examining such thinkers as Benedict de Spinoza (and other 'free-thinkers'), John Locke on toleration, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Immanuel Kant, and Mary Wollstonecraft. This is something different, however, from a course on modern philosophy. It also explores how the Enlightenment motto "Dare to Know!" reverberated in many areas of society and in many different places and how it was expressed through a variety of genres. Segment 2: The American Revolution Through a variety of genres, this segment explores the revolutionary period in America: the revolutionary promise as experienced and articulated on many levels of society, the impact of the revolution on various levels of society, and the ideals laid out in the Constitution. Segment 3: The French Revolution This segment reflects on debates about the origin of the French Revolution; it follows the course of the revolution itself, including Revolutionary politics, the collapse of the monarchy, and the reign of terror; in considering the aftermath of the revolution, it also treats responses by those in other countries and so anticipates the nineteenth century.

Note: Wednesday evening online sessions

  • Course #: BLHS-108-101
  • CRN: 14926
  • Format: Online
  • Instructor: Golden, C.
  • Dates: Aug 28 – Dec 20, 2019

BLHV-231-01   NEW!

Ethical Leadership

This course offers a selective introduction to the study of philosophy through the critical examination of ethical issues arising within situations calling for responsible leadership. We will apply theoretical principles to selected case studies from professional life, carrying out careful analysis of problems concerning right and wrong surrounding finance, accounting, and investment, marketing and advertising, corporate governance, international human rights, data science, global business, distributive and social justice, environmental policy, and national and global democratic citizenship.

Note: This is a required Business and Entrepreneurship concentration course.

  • Course #: BLHV-231-01
  • CRN: 36935
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Golden, C.
  • Dates: Aug 28 – Dec 20, 2019
  • Class Meetings:
  • Syllabus: Download

BLHS-031-101   NEW!

Fundamental Concepts of Modern Science

This course will help students grasp fundamental scientific concepts developed over more than eight hundred years; these concepts are essential in the understanding of our contemporary world. The students will also have an opportunity to understand how and when the so-called “conflict between science and religion” originated and its evolution through the Galileo conflict until present. Through classroom lectures and discussions, reading assignments, student presentations and issues debates, we will address the complex evolution of arguments at every step of discoveries of scientific concepts about our world and Church’s interpretation of them and in the process we will review and gain appreciation of one of the most exciting intellectual endeavors ever. This extraordinary display of substantive and original ideas which this debate generated for centuries continues today and allows us to enrich the understanding of our present universe from the smallest subatomic particle to the Big Bang expansion of the cosmos and challenges us to make our own judgment about the meaning of it all.

Note: This course meets the Natural Sciences core area requirement.

  • Course #: BLHS-031-101
  • CRN: 36881
  • Format: Online
  • Instructor: Cautis, D.
  • Dates: Aug 28 – Dec 20, 2019
  • Syllabus: Download

BLHS-076-01   NEW!

Interdisciplinary Writing

Note: This course meets the Writing Core Area requirement and is a Humanities Concentration elective. For students who elect to remain under the old curricular requirements, this course meets the BLHS 120 (Writing in an Interdisciplinary Environment) requirement.

  • Course #: BLHS-076-01
  • CRN: 36986
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Foster, G.
  • Dates: Aug 28 – Dec 20, 2019
  • Class Meetings:
  • Syllabus: Download

BLHV-280-101   NEW!

International Law

This course is designed to provide students with their first exposure to International Law. It will provide a comprehensive overview of the subject, focusing on history, theory, and the structure of international legal obligation and legal operation, as well as on specialized regimes and contemporary challenges. Where relevant and as much as possible, the course will draw on current events to offer and provoke critical analysis of complex international issues. This course will be of particular interest to those students interested in global affairs and international relations, and in pursuing further studies in law.

Note: This is a required International Relations concentration course.


BLHV-232-01   NEW!

Intro to Business

This course will provide a comprehensive introduction to business from a practical and “real-world” perspective, and explore the major areas of business to include product and service innovation and development; marketing and strategy; management and operations; and, finance. Importantly this course will explore the opportunities and challenges presenting by international business, technology, and the use of data and data analytics.

Note: This is a required Business and Entrepreneurship concentration course.

  • Course #: BLHV-232-01
  • CRN: 36936
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: O'Connor, C.
  • Dates: Aug 28 – Dec 20, 2019
  • Class Meetings:
  • Syllabus: Download

BLHS-299-01   NEW!

Introduction to Marketing

This course will cover those activities for creating and communicating the message of an organization regarding the goods or services it wishes to offer to customers, clients or members, and will include the concepts of advertising and selling. The course will consider both theoretical and practical aspects of how businesses engage in marketing efforts. Required course for Entrepreneurship and Organizational Leadership concentrations.

Note: This course meets the Business/Entrepreneurship Concentration Core and a Professional Media/Comm Concentration elective.

  • Course #: BLHS-299-01
  • CRN: 36932
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Fiddler, R.
  • Dates: Aug 28 – Dec 20, 2019
  • Class Meetings:
  • Syllabus: Download

BLHS-104-01

Medieval Thought and Culture

This course provides an overview of medieval history and the transformations of medieval society, from the waning of the Roman Empire through the fifteenth (and early sixteenth) centuries. The focus is on Western Europe, although attention will be paid to Europeans’ perception of forces, cultures and empires beyond their borders (e.g., the Vikings, the Byzantine Empire, the rise of Islam, etc.). Through a variety of genres (literary, religious, philosophical, and political texts—as well as art and music), this course explores the medieval imagination and the many textures of medieval life and thought.

Note: This course meets on the main campus (37th and O Streets NW).

  • Course #: BLHS-104-01
  • CRN: 37549
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Ray, J.
  • Dates: Aug 28 – Dec 20, 2019
  • Class Meetings:
    • Wed 6:00 PM - 9:30 PM, Healy, Room 321

BLHS-308-01

Personal Finance

Note: For students in the Georgetown Prison Scholars Program at the DC Jail.

  • Course #: BLHS-308-01
  • CRN: 37735
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Ryan, M.
  • Dates: Aug 28 – Dec 20, 2019
  • Class Meetings:

BLHS-307-01

Philosophy of Law

Note: For students in the Georgetown Prison Scholars Program at the DC Jail.

  • Course #: BLHS-307-01
  • CRN: 37734
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Lichtenberg, J.
  • Dates: Aug 28 – Dec 20, 2019
  • Class Meetings:

BLHS-309-01

Prisons and Punishment

Note: For students in the Georgetown Prison Scholars Program at the DC Jail.

  • Course #: BLHS-309-01
  • CRN: 37736
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Howard, M.
  • Dates: Aug 28 – Dec 20, 2019
  • Class Meetings:

BLHS-010-01

Religion and the Word

Note: This course meets the Culture or Humanities Core Area requirement (not both) and a Humanities Concentration Core requirement. For students who elect to remain under the old curriculum, this course meets the BLHS 103 (Biblical Literature and the Ancient World) core requirement.

  • Course #: BLHS-010-01
  • CRN: 37324
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Jensen, J.
  • Dates: Aug 28 – Dec 20, 2019
  • Class Meetings:
  • Syllabus: Download

BLHS-107-02

The Early Modern World

This course examines the shift from the medieval to the modern, comparing various theories of chronological demarcation and discovering the difficulty of assessing social, political, religious, and literary phenomena. Course focuses on the Reformation, William Shakespeare, and modern science.

  • Course #: BLHS-107-02
  • CRN: 36931
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Walkden, M.
  • Dates: Aug 28 – Dec 20, 2019
  • Class Meetings:
  • Syllabus: Download

BLHS-061-01   NEW!

The Human Condition

What makes us human? How much of this is a part of our “nature” (e.g., biological hardware, chemistry, and physiological changes) and how much of it is due to how we are nurtured (our socialization, cultures, and social interactions)? This course explores some of the most central aspects of the human condition and asks, “What makes us tick?” The class explores competing paradigms derived from a combination of studies and research from biology, medicine, psychology, sociology, economics, anthropology, archaeology, and historical observation. The structure of the course is inspired by the concept of a “hierarchy of needs”—beginning with essential “lower order” aspects of the human condition moving up toward the problems and issues that are more often the focus of life once the essentials of life have been obtained. The course challenges the notion that 21st century human beings are all that different from those that existed in 100, 1,000, or even 10,000 years ago. It also seeks to understand how human behavior can vary so much across cultures now. Reading material for the course also includes a combination of original source excerpts from the world’s religious and legal texts, and philosophers and scientists such as John Locke, René Descartes, B.F. Skinner, John Watson, Sigmund Freud, Karl Marx, Charles Darwin, Adam Smith, Sun Tzu, Niccolò Machiavelli, Edward O. Wilson. Lecture and the course readings are supplemented with suggested journal articles including current research as well as multimedia excerpts on each week’s topics.

Note: This course meets the Culture and Social Sciences Core Area requirements and a Humanities Concentration Elective requirement.

  • Course #: BLHS-061-01
  • CRN: 36922
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Gray, M.
  • Dates: Aug 28 – Dec 20, 2019
  • Class Meetings:
  • Syllabus: Download

BLHS-111-01

The New Millennium

This course must be taken as the student’s final course in the Core in that it draws on all the Core Courses. This is a course on late twentieth- and early twenty-first century America. Its time frame roughly corresponds to the life spans of most BALS students. Its purpose is to help apply the critical approaches they have learned elsewhere to the world in which they live.

Note: Class will be held at the Berkley Center, 3307 M Street, Second Floor, Suite 200.

  • Course #: BLHS-111-01
  • CRN: 18282
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Kessler, M.
  • Dates: Aug 28 – Dec 20, 2019
  • Class Meetings:
  • Syllabus: Download

BLHS-109-101

The Nineteenth Century

This course begins with Romanticism—its critique of the Enlightenment, its insistence that there is more to being human than reason, and its new way of envisioning the relationship between the individual and nature as well as between the individual and society. Romanticism began in Germany at the very end of the 18th century, was brought to England via Coleridge and Wordsworth, and crossed the Atlantic to America.


BLHS-106-101

The Renaissance

This course focuses on the concerns and practices of Renaissance thinkers, writers, and artists, with particular attention paid to the ways in which they defined their own intellectual and artistic projects and how they situated them vis à vis the antecedent traditions to which they were reacting.

Note: Day/time TBA

  • Course #: BLHS-106-101
  • CRN: 37550
  • Format: Online
  • Instructor: Golden, C.
  • Dates: Aug 28 – Dec 20, 2019

BLHV-497-01

Thesis Proposal Workshop

Students who complete Thesis Research (BLHV 348-01) and Thesis Writing (BLHV 349-01) will take the Thesis Proposal Workshop as a foundation for completing the proposed thesis.

  • Course #: BLHV-497-01
  • CRN: 15110
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: TBD
  • Dates: Aug 28 – Dec 20, 2019
  • Class Meetings:

BLHV-348-01

Thesis Research

Students who are approved for a BALS thesis will take this 0 credit course in preparation for thesis writing.

  • Course #: BLHV-348-01
  • CRN: 19099
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: TBD
  • Dates: Aug 28 – Dec 20, 2019
  • Class Meetings:

BLHV-349-01

Thesis Writing

Students work with the thesis advisor to begin constructing the framework for the proposed thesis.

  • Course #: BLHV-349-01
  • CRN: 19063
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: TBD
  • Dates: Aug 28 – Dec 20, 2019
  • Class Meetings:

BLHV-301-05

Independent Study

  • Course #: BLHV-301-05
  • CRN: 37712
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Gray, M.
  • Dates: Aug 28 – Dec 20, 2019
  • Class Meetings:

BLHS-110-01

War and Peace

In this course we analyze problems of war and peace from authoritarian, liberal, and realistic perspectives in the context of some national, ideological, and racial conflicts of the twentieth century. The course has two major components, one theoretical and the other humanist focused on novels, memoirs, historical narrations and films. We will study the views of the influential German jurist and political philosopher Carl Schmitt, a Nazi collaborator, who claims that the concept of enemy is the essence of the political and the ever present possibility of war is a reality humans can only deny hypocritically and are powerless to remove; the opposing view of American philosopher John Rawls who holds that a liberal conception of justice can be the basis for peace between peoples because even illiberal “decent” peoples may use it to solve international conflicts and avoid war; Samuel Huntington´s idea ( The Clash of Civilizations) that conflicts between civilizations will fuel the wars of the 21th century, and Francis Fukuyama´s theory ( The End of History and the Last Man) that the advance of democracy, capitalism, technological skills and science, in a word “globalization” will lead to a peaceful world society he identifies with the end of history.

  • Course #: BLHS-110-01
  • CRN: 18280
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Neimeyer, C.
  • Dates: Aug 28 – Dec 20, 2019
  • Class Meetings:
  • Syllabus: Download