Course Schedule for Spring 2020


Show

BLHS-011-01   NEW!

Ancient Mediterranean: Cultural Interactions

This course will look at the ancient Mediterranean from the angle of literature that focuses upon the interaction of various communities (including Greeks, Romans, Egyptians, Persians) in that region. The course will provide a historical framework, but the primary goal of the course is to develop a nuanced way of analyzing and thinking about ways in which communities define the “other” and use other groups as a way to define themselves. Though the content of the class focuses on the ancient world, the methods and content of analysis will contribute to a deeper understanding of the modern world.

Note: This course will satisfy either the culture or humanities core requirement. It is a concentration core required class for the humanities concentration.

  • Course #: BLHS-011-01
  • CRN: 38180
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructors: McNelis, C. , Sens, A.
  • Dates: Jan 08 – May 09, 2020
  • Class Meetings:
  • Syllabus: Download

BLHS-032-101

BioTech and Global Health

Following abuses such as World War II Nazi medical experiments on prisoners, and four decades of not treating men of color for syphilis at Tuskegee (1932-1972), in the early 1970’s, a government commission established guidelines for human subject research (Belmont, 1974-1979). This “bedside model” emphasizing autonomous (self-directed) patient consent became a quest for public agreement about procedures of sound clinical decision-making in the face of discrete uses or withholding/withdrawals of technology. These helped decisions about organ donation and neonatal intensive care (exploring rules such as justice, benefice and nonmalficence or “do no harm”). This pursuit energized a new discipline of “Bioethics” for nearly half a century, pioneered by distinguished colleagues at Georgetown University’s Kennedy Center of Bioethics. Such guidelines are now being enhanced by bigger social issues in biotechnology and global health such as the role of social and environmental contexts in enhancing the negative effects of disease interactions (“syndemics” such as diabetes-depression and poverty). These are now under investigation by nationally renowned Georgetown scholars in Global Health (colleague Prof. Mendenhall). In addition, this course explores benefits in patient care and public health that come from information engineering applied to the field of health care (health informatics) that have helped promote a century of improvements in sanitation and wellness (e.g. reproductive, maternal and children’s health) and technological gains in diagnosis and treatment of diseases; sanitation halted typhoid, cholera, and dysentery. Vaccinations stopped smallpox and polio. Prevention and intervention have helped with diabetes, cancers, heart disease, neurogenerative diseases such as depression, HIV/AIDS and Opioid dependencies. Such knowledge reduces premature mortality (years of life lost), disability (YLD), summarized as disability adjusted life years (DALY, According to the World Health Organization, WHO). This course surveys these issues and enables understanding intersections among “Biotechnology” and “Global Health”. Related resources for our course include materials from GU’s School of Nursing, Medical School and Science, Technology, and International Affairs (STIA) Program in the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service.

Note: This course will count as a non-western requirement for the old curriculum This course meets the Natural Sciences Core Area requirement or an International Relations concentration elective.


BLHS-227-101   NEW!

Business Statistics

This course will introduce students to elementary statistics for business. Students will learn the foundational concepts of probability, descriptive statistics, and inferential statistics, and they will learn the standard techniques that are used to analyze statistical data in a business environment.

Note: This is a required course for the business and entrepreneurship concentration This course meets a Business and Entrepreneurship requirement.

  • Course #: BLHS-227-101
  • CRN: 38179
  • Format: Online
  • Instructor: Paasch, J.
  • Dates: Jan 08 – May 09, 2020
  • Syllabus: Download

BLHS-108-101

Enlightenment, Revolution and Democracy

This course examines the Enlightenment from the particular angle of its relationship to the cultivation of democratic ideals and the emergence of modern democracies. It thus examines issues such as toleration, the rights and responsibilities of the individual, the importance of reason, and the role of religion in society. Segment 1: The Enlightenment This segment naturally has a strong philosophical component, examining such thinkers as Benedict de Spinoza (and other 'free-thinkers'), John Locke on toleration, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Immanuel Kant, and Mary Wollstonecraft. This is something different, however, from a course on modern philosophy. It also explores how the Enlightenment motto "Dare to Know!" reverberated in many areas of society and in many different places and how it was expressed through a variety of genres. Segment 2: The American Revolution Through a variety of genres, this segment explores the revolutionary period in America: the revolutionary promise as experienced and articulated on many levels of society, the impact of the revolution on various levels of society, and the ideals laid out in the Constitution. Segment 3: The French Revolution This segment reflects on debates about the origin of the French Revolution; it follows the course of the revolution itself, including Revolutionary politics, the collapse of the monarchy, and the reign of terror; in considering the aftermath of the revolution, it also treats responses by those in other countries and so anticipates the nineteenth century.

Note: This course is required for students pursuing the old curriculum.

  • Course #: BLHS-108-101
  • CRN: 39092
  • Format: Online
  • Instructor: Golden, C.
  • Dates: Jan 08 – May 09, 2020

BLHS-105-01

Faith and Reason in the Middle Ages

The relation between faith and reason is one of the perennial issues in Western thought. With the renaissance of the twelfth century and the founding of universities throughout Europe in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries, the question of faith and reason was dramatically recast. The rediscovery of Aristotle—and so, the use of Aristotelian logic, grammar, physics, and metaphysics—led to the development of new methods of inquiry, categories of thought, and modes of expression. This course begins with the twelfth-century renaissance; the cross-fertilization among Muslim, Jewish, and Christian scholars; the rise of the universities as important institutions; and the development of scholasticism. It focuses on the development of the scholastic method, resistance to it, and, in particular, discussions and sometimes fierce debates about "faith and reason" in Christianity and Judaism. The course also looks at the issue of authority and alternative approaches to faith and reason (e.g., mystical texts and vernacular theologies), the category of "heresy" and its ramifications (social, political, religious).

Note: Please be aware that this course will meet at the Main Campus This course is required for students pursuing the old curriculum.

  • Course #: BLHS-105-01
  • CRN: 39063
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Ray, J.
  • Dates: Jan 08 – May 09, 2020
  • Class Meetings:

BLHS-228-101   NEW!

Financial Management

This course introduces the theory and practice of corporate financial management and the application of financial management techniques to business decision-making. Topics include financial statement analysis, financial ratio analysis, the time value of money, risk and return, capital budgeting, cost of capital, sources and uses of financing, and international markets. Students will learn about data security standards, the importance of data anonymization and methods to identify and prevent insider threats.

Note: This is a required course for the business and entrepreneurship concentration This course is a Business and Entrepreneurship Concentration core.


BLHV-281-01

Hist of the International Syst

Note: This course fulfills an International Relations Core requirement.

  • Course #: BLHV-281-01
  • CRN: 39527
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Szarejko, A.
  • Dates: Jan 08 – May 09, 2020
  • Class Meetings:

BLHS-350-01   NEW!

History of Medicine

A survey of the development of medical knowledge and practice from ancient time down through modern times. Special attention is given to understanding these developments and advances in the context of the cultures and the historical and societal circumstances in which they occurred. This course requires no previous knowledge of medicine.

Note: This course will satisfy either the humanities or natural science core requirement. Additionally it could count for an elective in either the humanities or international relations concentration. This course will count as a non-western requirement for the old curriculum. This course meets the Natural Sciences Core requirement and an International Relations elective.

  • Course #: BLHS-350-01
  • CRN: 38182
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Jensen, J.
  • Dates: Jan 08 – May 09, 2020
  • Class Meetings:
  • Syllabus: Download

BLHV-273-01

International Organizations

Note: This course fulfills a International Relations Core requirement.

  • Course #: BLHV-273-01
  • CRN: 39526
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Kimou, S.
  • Dates: Jan 08 – May 09, 2020
  • Class Meetings:

BLHV-239-01

Introduction to International Relations

This course provides students with a basic framework for understanding the nature of contemporary international relations. The first part covers the intellectual traditions and classical theories used for examining the international system (realism, liberalism, radicalism, behavioralism). The second part looks at enduring issues in global security; great power competition, globalization, the problem of war, terrorism, and the emerging crises of environmental change and natural resource depletion. Throughout the course, we will take time to discuss the ethical dilemmas we confront when theory meets real world developments. Upon completion, students should be able to identify key concepts, actors, and issues in the modern interstate system and be prepared for advanced coursework in the field of international relations.

Note: This course will count as a non-western requirement for the old curriculum This course fulfills an International Relations concentration requirement.

  • Course #: BLHV-239-01
  • CRN: 38187
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: McMahon, M.
  • Dates: Jan 08 – May 09, 2020
  • Class Meetings:
  • Syllabus: Download

BLHV-301-03

Independent Study

  • Course #: BLHV-301-03
  • CRN: 39618
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Neimeyer, C.
  • Dates: Jan 08 – May 09, 2020
  • Class Meetings:

BLHV-225-101

Media Theory and Criticism

Media can be investigated through a variety of theories and methodologies. Our focus will be on several of the dominant critical perspectives that have contributed to our understanding of media texts. This course will provide students with the basic vocabulary and concepts used in the criticism of different types of media. Students will identify and describe basic concepts from different schools of media theory e.g. semiotics, ideological analysis, and gender criticism and apply these concepts to the analysis and interpretation of a range of media texts (e.g. print ads, TV commercials, films) in order to see how meanings are constructed within media texts. Students will also analyze the relation between the representations found in media texts and larger social structures such as class, gender and race. The course will also identify and describe significant concepts relating to media audiences and their role in the reception of media texts.

Note: This course will satisfy the social sciences core area. This is a required course of the professional media and communications concentration.

  • Course #: BLHV-225-101
  • CRN: 38188
  • Format: Online
  • Instructor: Pieto, R.
  • Dates: Jan 08 – May 09, 2020
  • Syllabus: Download

BLHS-104-01

Medieval Thought and Culture

This course provides an overview of medieval history and the transformations of medieval society, from the waning of the Roman Empire through the fifteenth (and early sixteenth) centuries. The focus is on Western Europe, although attention will be paid to Europeans’ perception of forces, cultures and empires beyond their borders (e.g., the Vikings, the Byzantine Empire, the rise of Islam, etc.). Through a variety of genres (literary, religious, philosophical, and political texts—as well as art and music), this course explores the medieval imagination and the many textures of medieval life and thought.

  • Course #: BLHS-104-01
  • CRN: 39591
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Jensen, J.
  • Dates: Jan 08 – May 09, 2020
  • Class Meetings:

BLHS-046-101   NEW!

Philosophy of Gender, Love, Sex

The poet and short story writer Raymond Carver once wrote: “It ought to make us feel ashamed when we talk like we know what we’re talking about when we talk about love.” This may seem like an odd admonition. After all, it is often said that love is one of the things that make life worthwhile. How can we really fail to understand something most of us assume to be so important and to which we devote so much time and effort? But a little reflection suggests that love is perplexing. Sexuality is a battleground in our culture. It is often seen as the terrain where love can become perverse or unethical. Do celibates sacrifice something important? Can one love multiple romantic partners simultaneously? Is it wrong to? Should marriage be restricted to opposite-sex couples? Should it be restricted to couples at all, rather than extended to groups of three or more people? In this course, we will explore such questions in order to clarify and deepen our engagement with contemporary problems surrounding love and sexuality. Some authors whose work we will examine include Thomas Aquinas, Judith Butler, Irving Singer, Martha Nussbaum and Audre Lorde. The goal of the course is to help us become more thoughtful about the problems and possibilities of love and sexuality in our lives and our society.

Note: This course satisfies the core humanities requirement. It also counts as an elective in the humanities concentration. This course fulfills a Philosophy Core requirement.

  • Course #: BLHS-046-101
  • CRN: 38189
  • Format: Online
  • Instructor: Golden, C.
  • Dates: Jan 08 – May 09, 2020
  • Syllabus: Download

BLHV-301-01

Independent Study

  • Course #: BLHV-301-01
  • CRN: 39587
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Jensen, J.
  • Dates: Jan 08 – May 09, 2020
  • Class Meetings:

BLHS-062-01   NEW!

Social Psychology of Economic Behavior

Economics has developed as a highly deductive social science. It begins with rather rigid assumptions about how human beings should behave to be “rational.” These were developed in the late-18th Century. Yet, inductive approaches, such as psychology and sociology understand human behavior with much a more inductive lens. How do people actually act economically and socially in feudal, capitalist, socialist, or communist economic systems? How do they react to the “rules of the game” and what are the consequences? This course examines and compares the economic systems humans have used historically to define the social psychology of economic behavior. It also addresses the future of economic systems given new technologies like automation and artificial intelligence and the rapid expansion of globalization and online commerce.

Note: This course meets a Social Sciences Core class and a Business Concentration elective.

  • Course #: BLHS-062-01
  • CRN: 38181
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Gray, M.
  • Dates: Jan 08 – May 09, 2020
  • Class Meetings:
  • Syllabus: Download

BLHV-222-101   NEW!

Storytelling for Influence

History has shown that stories are inextricably linked to what it means to be human. Before we had formal communication, storytelling was the method through which we made sense of the world and that core function of the phenomenon has never changed. We dream in stories, buy products and support charitable causes because of stories, understand who we are in part by thinking in the format of stories, and, yes, even close our office doors and gossip thanks to the help of stories! This course will provide you with an opportunity to think critically about the endless ways in which storytelling is—and can be—utilized in our modern world. Specifically, you will focus on analyzing the process of storytelling as a tool for influence and to do so duly through ethical and strategic ways within the four categories of personal, professional, societal and self-applications. This course will expand your mindset, appreciation and practice of storytelling as a crucial component of the human tradition.

Note: This course fulfills a Professional Media and Communication Concentration Digital Media Track requirement or the Writing Core Area requirement.

  • Course #: BLHV-222-101
  • CRN: 38902
  • Format: Online
  • Instructor: Trybus, J.
  • Dates: Mar 04 – May 04, 2020
  • Syllabus: Download

BLHS-422-101

Strategy and the Strategic Mindset

Note: Independent study format.

  • Course #: BLHS-422-101
  • CRN: 39360
  • Format: Online
  • Instructor: Paasch, J.
  • Dates: Jan 08 – May 09, 2020

BLHS-061-101   NEW!

The Human Condition

What makes us human? How much of this is a part of our “nature” (e.g., biological hardware, chemistry, and physiological changes) and how much of it is due to how we are nurtured (our socialization, cultures, and social interactions)? This course explores some of the most central aspects of the human condition and asks, “What makes us tick?” The class explores competing paradigms derived from a combination of studies and research from biology, medicine, psychology, sociology, economics, anthropology, archaeology, and historical observation. The structure of the course is inspired by the concept of a “hierarchy of needs”—beginning with essential “lower order” aspects of the human condition moving up toward the problems and issues that are more often the focus of life once the essentials of life have been obtained. The course challenges the notion that 21st century human beings are all that different from those that existed in 100, 1,000, or even 10,000 years ago. It also seeks to understand how human behavior can vary so much across cultures now. Reading material for the course also includes a combination of original source excerpts from the world’s religious and legal texts, and philosophers and scientists such as John Locke, René Descartes, B.F. Skinner, John Watson, Sigmund Freud, Karl Marx, Charles Darwin, Adam Smith, Sun Tzu, Niccolò Machiavelli, Edward O. Wilson. Lecture and the course readings are supplemented with suggested journal articles including current research as well as multimedia excerpts on each week’s topics.

Note: This course will count as a non-western requirement for the old curriculum This course meets the Social Sciences or Culture Core Area requirement or a Humanities Concentration Elective requirement.

  • Course #: BLHS-061-101
  • CRN: 39046
  • Format: Online
  • Instructor: Gray, M.
  • Dates: Jan 08 – May 09, 2020
  • Syllabus: Download

BLHS-111-01

The New Millennium

This course must be taken as the student’s final course in the Core in that it draws on all the Core Courses. This is a course on late twentieth- and early twenty-first century America. Its time frame roughly corresponds to the life spans of most BALS students. Its purpose is to help apply the critical approaches they have learned elsewhere to the world in which they live.

Note: please contact ls-advising@georgetown.edu for registration for this course. Class will be held at Berkley Center, 3307 M. St. NW, Suite 200.

  • Course #: BLHS-111-01
  • CRN: 16305
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Kessler, M.
  • Dates: Jan 08 – May 09, 2020
  • Class Meetings:
  • Syllabus: Download

BLHS-106-01

The Renaissance

This course focuses on the concerns and practices of Renaissance thinkers, writers, and artists, with particular attention paid to the ways in which they defined their own intellectual and artistic projects and how they situated them vis à vis the antecedent traditions to which they were reacting.

Note: This course is required for students pursuing the old curriculum.

  • Course #: BLHS-106-01
  • CRN: 39069
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Francomano, E.
  • Dates: Jan 08 – May 09, 2020
  • Class Meetings:
  • Syllabus: Download

BLHV-301-02

Independent Study

  • Course #: BLHV-301-02
  • CRN: 39588
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Klein, R.
  • Dates: Jan 08 – May 09, 2020
  • Class Meetings:

BLHS-110-01

War and Peace

In this course we analyze problems of war and peace from authoritarian, liberal, and realistic perspectives in the context of some national, ideological, and racial conflicts of the twentieth century. The course has two major components, one theoretical and the other humanist focused on novels, memoirs, historical narrations and films. We will study the views of the influential German jurist and political philosopher Carl Schmitt, a Nazi collaborator, who claims that the concept of enemy is the essence of the political and the ever present possibility of war is a reality humans can only deny hypocritically and are powerless to remove; the opposing view of American philosopher John Rawls who holds that a liberal conception of justice can be the basis for peace between peoples because even illiberal “decent” peoples may use it to solve international conflicts and avoid war; Samuel Huntington´s idea ( The Clash of Civilizations) that conflicts between civilizations will fuel the wars of the 21th century, and Francis Fukuyama´s theory ( The End of History and the Last Man) that the advance of democracy, capitalism, technological skills and science, in a word “globalization” will lead to a peaceful world society he identifies with the end of history.

Note: One of the more unfortunate constants of the human condition is the regularity of outbreaks of violence related to warfare. War is not just battles and who won, who lost. It is the all-important relationship between a people, a state, and its military and their trust and faith in their government and its decisions. This relationship has formed the basis of national security and foreign policy and has remained fairly consistent until now. However, a newer crop of strategists has risen to challenge the former ideas of war and ask whether those concepts of war can be applied in this age of technological revolution and to the current non-nation state actors that have taken a place on the stage of conflict. So what has changed? Will future war be as different to modern practitioners as it must have seemed to the Aztecs when they confronted the technologically advanced Conquistadors? Has technology finally offered the modern-day strategist an ability to achieve near total “battlefield awareness?” Are we moving in the direction of director James Cameron’s vision of future war that he espoused in “Terminator” where warfare is robots and drones and the human element gone? Can the argument be taken a step further and stated that technology has fundamentally changed how we should view “art of war” in the 21st century? Indeed, the concept of peace has been especially changed by the modern-day phenomenon of technologically savvy and largely stateless terror organizations. Today, terrorists with an apocalyptic worldview now wage a new form of near constant warfare. Does the growth and proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and the possibility of such weapons falling into the hands of those willing to use them guarantee that true peace will remain as elusive as ever in the 21st century? This course will explore the moral underpinnings of war as expressed by St. Thomas Aquinas. We will focus on the phenomenon of warfare and discuss what defines “just” or “unjust” use of violence by a people or entire nations. Because nations have engaged in activity such as genocide we will also study what type of behavior remains clearly beyond the pale of “legalized” violence and has crossed over into the realm of “crimes against humanity” and how terroristic acts fits into our former concepts of warfare. Accordingly, we will start with an examination of the Thirty Years War and the transformation of war from regional disputes to large nation states vying for power that transcend cultural relationships. Progressing quickly through wars of the 19th century, we will discuss how the two World Wars changed the scope of war and its global consequences. Perhaps the most important aspect we will look at is why did countries go to war and at the end, did they achieve what they wanted? We will see that all too often that answer is no. We will also study the phenomenon of extended periods of peace. What factors have coalesced in a positive way f

  • Course #: BLHS-110-01
  • CRN: 39359
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Neimeyer, C.
  • Dates: Jan 08 – May 09, 2020
  • Class Meetings: