Mikail Mamedov

Mikail Mamedov is Affiliate Adjunct Professor at History Department and Liberal Studies Program of the School of Continuing Education.

Mikail Mamedov


Mikail Mamedov was born in the city of Baku, Azerbaijan, where he started his academic career, studying history at the (then) Azerbaijan State University. After the outbreak of the Karabakh conflict and anti-Armenian violence in Azerbaijan on January 20, 1990, his multi-ethnic family had to flee to Moscow in the wake of the Baku pogroms (January 13-19). He graduated from the Department of History of the Moscow Lomonosov State University, MGU, (cum laude) in June 1994 and was briefly enrolled in the MGU's Ph.D. program (aspirantura). In September 1996 his family immigrated to the USA as refugees, and shortly thereafter he assumed a one-year position as a Lecturer in Russian with the Department of Languages and Literature at Southern Utah University in Cedar City, Utah. Later, he received his MA from George Washington University in History (2001) and PhD. in History from Georgetown University (2010) where he worked under guidance of renowned historians Richard Stites and Catherine Evtuhov. His PhD. dissertation was entitled “Imagining the Caucasus in Russian Imperial Consciousness, 1801-1864.” His dissertation research in Russia and Georgia were sponsored by Fulbright Hays and SSRC dissertational fellowships. He also taught at Northern Virginia Community College at Alexandria, Georgetown University, and George Mason University. He frequently presents papers at American Association of Eurasian and Eastern European Studies (formerly AAASS), the Southern Slavic Studies Association and the Association for Study of Nationalities. His works and articles have been published in Tsentral’naya Aziia i Kavkaz (journal), Russian Review, Russian History, Caucasus Survey, Nationality Papers, Journal of Levant Studies (Israel), Analitykon (journal -Karabakh) and online at Politcom.ru and Russia-Direct.org

He is interested in Russian Imperial history, the history and politics of the Caucasus, problems of nationalism and ethnic conflicts in the former-Soviet Union.

He is currently working on a book, The Caucasus in the Russian Mind: Imagining the Caucasus in Russian Imperial Consciousness, 1801-1864, which is based on his dissertation.