26 Jan 12-1pm ET
Master's in Journalism Webinar  

Curriculum

To earn an MPS in Journalism, you must successfully complete 10 courses (30 credits total), including:

  • 2 core courses (6 credits total):
    • Ethics in Journalism
    • Capstone
  • 3 foundation courses (9 credits total):
    • Reporting and News Writing
    • Digital Essentials for Journalists
    • Photo and Video Storytelling
  • 5 elective courses (15 credits total):

Program Format

The program is offered in the on-campus format. Classes are held at the same times every week at our downtown D.C. campus

You’ll have the flexibility to earn your degree at a pace that suits your schedule. You can take up to 9 credits per semester and complete the degree in as little as 17 months, or you can take as little as one course per semester and complete it in five years. Here are what other students typically do:

  • Full-time students typically take 9 credits (3 courses) during the fall and spring semesters, and 6 credits (2 courses) during the summer semester.
  • Part-time students typically take 3 to 6 credits (1 to 2 courses) during the fall, spring, and summer semesters.

Internships & Fellowships

Georgetown’s Journalism program provides numerous opportunities to work with established journalists and media organizations in the Washington, D.C., area and around the world. Through coursework, internships, and fellowships, you'll be able to forge strong industry connections as you build your network both inside and outside the classroom.

Our students have worked with leading news and media organizations, including:

  • The Associated Press
  • The Baltimore Sun
  • BBC
  • CBS Radio
  • CNN
  • The Dallas Morning News
  • The Huffington Post
  • MSNBC
  • National Geographic
  • NBC4 in Washington
  • NPR
  • The Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press
  • Slate
  • The Washington City Paper
  • Washingtonian
  • The Washington Post
  • WUSA9
  • USA Today

Accreditation

All programs offered by Georgetown University are accredited by the Middle States Commission on Higher Education.