Course Schedule for Spring 2019


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MPJO-723-01

Audio Storytelling

Audio storytelling is an art form that when mastered is one of the most effective methods of communicating to a mass audience. In the evolving world of multimedia presentations, the principles of storytelling through compelling characters and natural sound have remained unchanged - from human-interest stories and profiles to audio postcards and podcasts. It’s a craft mastered by journalists and communicators in public radio for decades. Content generators must consider audio production as part of their communication arsenal, as it may – at times – be a fairly inexpensive method of delivering messages to groups of people. In this course, journalists and communication specialists will learn the fundamental principles of how to put together audio pieces that tells an interesting story by using a strong narrative and recorded sounds. Students will develop interviewing skills, field recording techniques and the use of multi-track audio production software. They will learn the different stages of putting together sound-rich audio stories and how to publish their work on multimedia outlets.

Note: This class meets in the Mac Lab. Students must have the prerequisites of MPJO 508 and MPJO 501 Reporting and News Writing to enroll. This course is cross-listed with MPPR 723.

  • Course #: MPJO-723-01
  • CRN: 28826
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Arrieta, R.
  • Dates: Jan 09 – May 11, 2019
  • Class Meetings:

MPJO-506-01

Digital Analytics

This course examines the processes for gathering, interpreting, and presenting compelling digital data. Students will learn to use digital public opinion polling, specialized reports, social media platforms, digital analysis tools, and news aggregators to explain market research, audience trends, and social conversations. Students will also create data visualization tools to streamline data presentation into succinct, engaging formats.

Note: This course is cross-listed with MPPR-506 and MPMC-806. This course is housed in the Public Relations and Corporate Communications program. Students must have completed MPJO-501 Reporting and News Writing, MPJO 500 Ethics, MPJO 508 Photo and Video, MPJO 505 Digital Essentials to take this course.

  • Course #: MPJO-506-01
  • CRN: 36404
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Lukich, M.
  • Dates: Jan 09 – May 11, 2019
  • Class Meetings:

MPJO-505-01

Digital Essentials for Journalists

This course examines the essential digital skills needed in the field of journalism today. We will study the current media landscape to help students understand how digital skills and sensibilities are integrated with reporting, content creation, information dissemination and audience building efforts at news organizations of all sizes. The course involves a survey of key issues affecting the day-to-day work of modern journalists, as well as an examination of emerging technologies, platforms and ideas. Case studies, readings, media surveillance and guest lectures will help students learn the core skills needed to broaden their career opportunities; to add to their fundamental reporting background; and to think entrepreneurially about how to shape journalism. The final project will consist of a semester-long, team-created digital project that implements the full range of skills covered in the course. Students will: • learn practical, effective and applicable digital skills • create and distribute original content • investigate how individuals build traditional or unique journalism careers • develop and debate ideas using a collaborative, interactive team approach • display learning in class discussions, writing assignments and the final project This course is required for all MPS Journalism students. In order to satisfy graduation requirements, students must earn a B (3.00) or higher. Any student who fails to do so must repeat the course.

Note: Foundation course required for the Journalism program. This course requires a 'B' or better grade.

  • Course #: MPJO-505-01
  • CRN: 21031
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Scola, N.
  • Dates: Jan 09 – May 11, 2019
  • Class Meetings:

MPJO-761-01

Entertainment Reporting

From performances attended by presidents at the Kennedy Center, to go-go concerts at the 9:30 Club, to celebrity-filled red carpets at the National Portrait Gallery, Washington is increasingly becoming a go-to destination for all things entertainment. This course will teach students not only how to cover and critique the arts and pop culture, interview public figures, and produce entertainment news stories, but how to navigate the ever-changing media environment, confront the ethical issues facing the entertainment beat, and prepare for its future. COURSE OBJECTIVES Students will learn how to: ? Understand the history of entertainment journalism and its changing landscape. ? Label key entertainment publications, players, terms and current events. ? Navigate the tricky ethical landmines involving entertainment and gossip reporting. ? Develop a social media and personal brand as an entertainment journalist. ? Develop a portfolio of writing samples, including a feature story based on an interview with a celebrity/artist, a performing arts critique, and a mock red carpet article.

Note: Students must have completed MPJO-500 Ethics in Journalism, MPJO-501 Reporting and News Writing and MPJO-508 Photo & Video Storytelling to take this course.

  • Course #: MPJO-761-01
  • CRN: 36399
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Judy Kurtz Altscher
  • Dates: Jan 09 – May 11, 2019
  • Class Meetings:

MPJO-500-01

Ethics in Journalism

Ethics in journalism is not a list of DOs and DON’Ts tacked above your desk that you refer to when someone hands you stolen documents. Ethics in journalism is a series of decisions you make constantly, every day, in the routine exercise of you work. How many sources are enough for this story? What are the implications of referring to “campaign cash” instead of “campaign donations”? How much of the defendant’s quote should I use? This class is therefore intended to explore the myriad grey areas that dominate the way journalists work and live, the blurry lines that divide right from wrong, or, more accurately, divide “probably should” from “probably shouldn’t.” The goal of the class is to help you understand the ethical implications of the choices journalists make, to empower you to navigate the ethical minefield of attempting every day to explain to the world the activities of other people. This course is required for all MPS Journalism students, and must be completed by the second semester in the program. Students must earn a B (3.00) or higher in order to satisfy graduation requirements.

Note: This is a core class. Students must receive a grade of a "B" or better in this course. Additional 150 min. distance learning component required.

  • Course #: MPJO-500-01
  • CRN: 32190
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Smith-Barrow, D.
  • Dates: Jan 09 – May 11, 2019
  • Class Meetings:

MPJO-861-01

Journalism Internship II

Internships are a great way for students to gain real-world experiences and network with professionals in the field. Many employers require at least some internship experience to appear on a student’s resume. Taking on an internship while in the MPS Journalism program can help students integrate and enhance the skills they are learning in the classroom with professional, hands-on experiences. Students must participate in the internship according to the guidelines furnished by the employer, and they will be required to submit a weekly 500 word writing assignment reflecting on the successes and challenges of the internship. At the end of each semester, the student’s supervisor must complete an evaluation of the student’s performance, and submit it directly to the MPS Journalism program. ** Students must receive approval from the MPS Journalism program prior to enrolling in the Internship class. Note: Extensive, documented academic activity and experiential learning outside of classroom (min. 6-8 hours per week) is required.

Note: Cross-listed with MPPR-873 and MPMC-774. Prerequisite for this course is MPJO 860 internship one class.

  • Course #: MPJO-861-01
  • CRN: 36516
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Garcia, G.
  • Dates: Jan 09 – May 11, 2019
  • Class Meetings:

MPJO-900-01

MPS Journalism Capstone

The Master of Professional Studies Journalism degree program culminates in the Capstone. Each student produces a substantive and original reporting project on a timely issue that showcases his/her talents as a prospective journalist. It should be a major work of professional quality that requires extensive legwork, interviewing and research and will become the centerpiece of your portfolio. The Capstone experience is intended to provide students an opportunity to demonstrate that they have the journalistic skills, ethics and initiative necessary to be a professional journalist. The Capstone project is an independent reporting endeavor. Class sessions provide feedback and structure. Group instructors will give you guidance throughout the semester, and your small groups will serve as mini-newsrooms where you will be expected to give each other feedback and support. Successful completion of the MPSJ degree also requires submitting an ethics essay that reflects on your firsthand experience as a journalist. The essay will be graded as one of the assignments in the Capstone class. This is a core course of the MPS Journalism program, and students must earn a “B” (83) or higher to pass the course. Please see the Graduate Student Handbook for more details. Students with at least a 3.0 cumulative GPA who receive a final grade of a B- or below may receive one opportunity to retake the course, if approved by the dean.

Note: Core course requirement for the Journalism program. This course requires a "B" or better grade. Students must have completed MPJO-501 Reporting and News Writing, MPJO 500 Ethics, MPJO 508 Photo and Video, MPJO 505 Digital Essentials. This course must be taken in the student's final semester.

  • Course #: MPJO-900-01
  • CRN: 16613
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Feldman, C.
  • Dates: Jan 09 – May 11, 2019
  • Class Meetings:

MPJO-860-01

MPS Journalism Internship

Internships are a great way for students to gain real-world experiences and network with professionals in the field. Many employers require at least some internship experience to appear on a student’s resume. Taking on an internship while in the MPS Journalism program can help students integrate and enhance the skills they are learning in the classroom with professional, hands-on experiences. Students must participate in the internship according to the guidelines furnished by the employer, and they will be required to submit a weekly 500 word writing assignment reflecting on the successes and challenges of the internship. At the end of each semester, the student’s supervisor must complete an evaluation of the student’s performance, and submit it directly to the MPS Journalism program. ** Students must receive approval from the MPS Journalism program prior to enrolling in the Internship class.

Note: Requires approval of the MPS Journalism program.

  • Course #: MPJO-860-01
  • CRN: 19145
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Garcia, G.
  • Dates: Jan 09 – May 11, 2019
  • Class Meetings:

MPJO-891-01

Personal Branding (Cross-listed with MPPR 891)

ambiguous ingredients in a career strategy. This course will arm students with the resources to evaluate, improve, and employ personal branding strategies for themselves and for key members of their organizational team. The course will discuss personal branding strategies in both digital and event contexts – including social media platforms, presentations, and networking opportunities.

Note: Also listed as MPPR 891-01 and MPMC 891-01. Students must have completed MPJO-501 Reporting and News Writing, MPJO 500 Ethics, MPJO 508 Photo and Video, MPJO 505 Digital Essentials.

  • Course #: MPJO-891-01
  • CRN: 32578
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Blymire, C.
  • Dates: Jan 09 – May 11, 2019
  • Class Meetings:

MPJO-891-02

Personal Branding (Cross-listed with MPPR 891)

ambiguous ingredients in a career strategy. This course will arm students with the resources to evaluate, improve, and employ personal branding strategies for themselves and for key members of their organizational team. The course will discuss personal branding strategies in both digital and event contexts – including social media platforms, presentations, and networking opportunities.

Note: Also listed as MPPR 891-02 and MPMC 891-02. MPJO-501 Reporting and News Writing, MPJO 500 Ethics, MPJO 508 Photo and Video, MPJO 505 Digital Essentials.

  • Course #: MPJO-891-02
  • CRN: 28828
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Blymire, C.
  • Dates: Jan 09 – May 11, 2019
  • Class Meetings:

MPJO-508-01   Canceled

Photo and Video Storytelling

Foundation requirement for Journalism majors. This course requires a grade of "B" or better to pass. Additional 150 minute distance learning component required Course Description: This course is designed to give the student the ability to communicate in the Video Age--whether for television or the web. We call it storytelling to emphasize the communication of ideas, rather than simply the technical knowledge of shooting and editing video. Students will begin by learning how shots work together, how to write compelling scripts, and how to use audio for best effect. Then students will work with professional camera equipment to develop shooting, lighting, and audio skills. The class will also have hands-on instruction in editing techniques using Final Cut Pro. By the end of the course, students should be comfortable in the video storytelling process--from the flash of an idea, to the finished product on the screen, in the field, and in the studio. Students who entered the MPS Journalism program in Summer 2010 and thereafter must complete this class and receive a grade of solid "B" (3.00) or higher in order to graduate.

  • Course #: MPJO-508-01
  • CRN: 36406
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: TBD
  • Dates: Jan 09 – May 11, 2019
  • Class Meetings:

MPJO-501-01

Reporting and News Writing

Journalism begins with basic reporting. This class focuses on the basics of beat reporting, one of the building blocks of any newsroom and journalism career. The class will also take a closer look at the reporting and writing process, from finding an idea to researching it, pitching it and executing it into a publishable article. Students will strive to become experts on the neighborhood they cover through old-school shoe leather reporting and will keep abreast of spot news while learning how to identify and pursue longer-form enterprise stories. The class will also have a Twitter handle and Facebook page — DChoods — where students will publish routinely and practice writing for social media and cultivating sources and finding story ideas using these new tools. The updates on Twitter and Facebook will not just be news stories, but also tidbits collected during visits to the neighborhood, which should be visited weekly at minimum. This is a core course of the MPS Journalism program, and students must earn a “B” (83) or higher to pass the course. Please see the Graduate Student Handbook for more details.

Note: Foundation requirement for the Journalism Program. This course requires a grade of "B" or better.

  • Course #: MPJO-501-01
  • CRN: 30302
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Bjerga, A.
  • Dates: Jan 09 – May 11, 2019
  • Class Meetings:

MPJO-631-01

Sourcing & Interview Tech.

Journalists find sources ask questions for a living. But how do you network to find the people you need for a story? How do you figure out what questions to ask and how to pose them? How do you stay in control of the conversation? This class will explore both how to find sources and then how to interview them effectively. It will look at the art and the science of the interview, from tactics for securing your subjects' cooperation to strategies for getting the information you need from them. We will engage in hands-on exercises to hone these skills, hear tips from guest speakers and analyze interviews to figure out what works and what doesn’t.

Note: Students must have completed MPJO 501 Reporting and News Writing and MPJO 508 Photo & Video Storytelling. Requires 150 minutes of distance learning or one additional class meeting outside of the standard meeting dates.

  • Course #: MPJO-631-01
  • CRN: 33826
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Parker, L.
  • Dates: Jan 09 – May 11, 2019
  • Class Meetings:

MPJO-560-01

Strt Career Planning & Mgmt

Managing your career and continuing your professional development are cornerstones to success. Whether you are aspiring to your next promotion, searching for a new job, or changing industries, understanding the elements of strategic career planning and professional development will guide you toward your goals. In today’s world economy, learning and implementing these strategic are essential to both personal and professional well being and success. There are specific professional management strategies that will ensure preparedness, markateabability, and competitiveness for your next career move. Each week, we will focus key elements of strategic career development using the previous week’s readings and assignments, and by utilizing class activities that will demonstrate what you have learned. Individual participation and in-class assignments/presentations will be included to enhance the learning experience. This course will provide you with the knowledge and tools that can be customized and applied to your career and your vision for the future.

Note: Cross-listed with MPPR 560-01 and MPMC 560-01. This is a zero-credit, non-graded course. Students who miss more than two classes or more than one assignment will be administratively withdrawn from the course.

  • Course #: MPJO-560-01
  • CRN: 28677
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Sunny Levitt
  • Dates: Jan 09 – May 11, 2019
  • Class Meetings:

MPJO-779-01

Web Development for Media

Merely using the web and digital tools is no longer enough for today's media professionals. Journalists and communicators need to have a practical understanding of how websites and applications work. This class does not aim to make you a professional coder or require any previous web development experience. We want you to come away with enough coding skills that you can effectively collaborate with web developers and continue learning on your own. You will learn about web development by diving into Git, Python, HTML, CSS and JavaScript. There will be readings and guest speakers, but the major basis for instruction will be hands-on learning activities. You'll learn how web developers work by identifying a project, breaking that project down into features and then building those features. By the end of the class, you won't just have a functional website; you'll be comfortable with the best practices of good development teams.

Note: This course is cross-listed with MPPR-779.

  • Course #: MPJO-779-01
  • CRN: 36520
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Linch, G.
  • Dates: Jan 09 – May 11, 2019
  • Class Meetings: