Course Schedule for Spring 2020


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LSHV-427-01

Cities on Celluloid

Cinema and cities both offer built environments of seductive experiential richness. There is also a given historical connection between them as products of the same industrial and social transformations. The 21st century has seen the rise of megacities, migrant fragmented communities and global mediascapes. Can existing theoretical frameworks contain new formations from across the globe? What remains of the twentieth century's ideas of the city and its corresponding cinematic visions in films in the 21st century? How does the modern European and North American city correspond to the new megacities of Latin America, Africa and Asia?

  • Course #: LSHV-427-01
  • CRN: 38178
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Tiwari, B.
  • Dates: Jan 08 – May 09, 2020
  • Class Meetings:
    • Wed 6:00 PM - 8:30 PM, Car Barn, Room 303
  • Syllabus: Download

LSHV-911-03

DLS Directed Reading/Research

The Directed Reading course requires that a professor determine with the student the nature and number of reading materials and research required to satisfy the goal of that particular course. Students may further strengthen their reading and their pending thesis through the creation of no more than three Directed Reading courses, and no more than two of these courses with the same professor, after consultation with and approval by the DLS Director. The Directed Reading course professor must hold an advanced degree beyond the master’s level. Upon completion and approval of the Directed Reading course proposal by the professor and the DLS Director, the student forwards the form with approvals to the GLSP Assistant Dean who sets up the course with the Registrar and requests enrollment of the student.

  • Course #: LSHV-911-03
  • CRN: 39529
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Soltes, O.
  • Dates: Jan 08 – May 09, 2020
  • Class Meetings:

LSHV-911-04

DLS Directed Reading/Research

The Directed Reading course requires that a professor determine with the student the nature and number of reading materials and research required to satisfy the goal of that particular course. Students may further strengthen their reading and their pending thesis through the creation of no more than three Directed Reading courses, and no more than two of these courses with the same professor, after consultation with and approval by the DLS Director. The Directed Reading course professor must hold an advanced degree beyond the master’s level. Upon completion and approval of the Directed Reading course proposal by the professor and the DLS Director, the student forwards the form with approvals to the GLSP Assistant Dean who sets up the course with the Registrar and requests enrollment of the student.

  • Course #: LSHV-911-04
  • CRN: 39535
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Giordano, J.
  • Dates: Jan 08 – May 09, 2020
  • Class Meetings:

LSHV-911-05

DLS Directed Reading/Research

The Directed Reading course requires that a professor determine with the student the nature and number of reading materials and research required to satisfy the goal of that particular course. Students may further strengthen their reading and their pending thesis through the creation of no more than three Directed Reading courses, and no more than two of these courses with the same professor, after consultation with and approval by the DLS Director. The Directed Reading course professor must hold an advanced degree beyond the master’s level. Upon completion and approval of the Directed Reading course proposal by the professor and the DLS Director, the student forwards the form with approvals to the GLSP Assistant Dean who sets up the course with the Registrar and requests enrollment of the student.

  • Course #: LSHV-911-05
  • CRN: 39576
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Ruf, F.
  • Dates: Jan 08 – May 09, 2020
  • Class Meetings:

LSHV-911-06

DLS Directed Reading/Research

The Directed Reading course requires that a professor determine with the student the nature and number of reading materials and research required to satisfy the goal of that particular course. Students may further strengthen their reading and their pending thesis through the creation of no more than three Directed Reading courses, and no more than two of these courses with the same professor, after consultation with and approval by the DLS Director. The Directed Reading course professor must hold an advanced degree beyond the master’s level. Upon completion and approval of the Directed Reading course proposal by the professor and the DLS Director, the student forwards the form with approvals to the GLSP Assistant Dean who sets up the course with the Registrar and requests enrollment of the student.

  • Course #: LSHV-911-06
  • CRN: 39748
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Giordano, J.
  • Dates: Jan 08 – May 09, 2020
  • Class Meetings:

LSHV-911-02

DLS Directed Reading/Research

The Directed Reading course requires that a professor determine with the student the nature and number of reading materials and research required to satisfy the goal of that particular course. Students may further strengthen their reading and their pending thesis through the creation of no more than three Directed Reading courses, and no more than two of these courses with the same professor, after consultation with and approval by the DLS Director. The Directed Reading course professor must hold an advanced degree beyond the master’s level. Upon completion and approval of the Directed Reading course proposal by the professor and the DLS Director, the student forwards the form with approvals to the GLSP Assistant Dean who sets up the course with the Registrar and requests enrollment of the student.

  • Course #: LSHV-911-02
  • CRN: 39260
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Phan, P.
  • Dates: Jan 08 – May 09, 2020
  • Class Meetings:

LSHV-911-01

DLS Directed Reading/Research

The Directed Reading course requires that a professor determine with the student the nature and number of reading materials and research required to satisfy the goal of that particular course. Students may further strengthen their reading and their pending thesis through the creation of no more than three Directed Reading courses, and no more than two of these courses with the same professor, after consultation with and approval by the DLS Director. The Directed Reading course professor must hold an advanced degree beyond the master’s level. Upon completion and approval of the Directed Reading course proposal by the professor and the DLS Director, the student forwards the form with approvals to the GLSP Assistant Dean who sets up the course with the Registrar and requests enrollment of the student.

  • Course #: LSHV-911-01
  • CRN: 39259
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Looney, K.
  • Dates: Jan 08 – May 09, 2020
  • Class Meetings:

LSHV-602-01

DLS Foundational 2

In this course, we start from theological reasoning on basic human experience (suffering, pleasure, friendship, anger, etc.) with a focus on the perspective that such reasoning offers for critical issues in society (drug addiction, extreme social inequality, climate change, prison crisis, etc.). How does thinking theologically align with and even enhance other kinds of thinking about the establishment of civil society and the advancement of human prosperity? We first consider what we mean by theology. Is it even religious, strictly speaking? Then, in our pursuit of insight into the workings of the good society, we consider a range of readings, some overtly religious, others ostensibly scientific (in the broad sense of credible knowledge), all of which are meant to help us think more expansively and more creatively about problem-solving today.

Note: DLS Seminar 2, must take in sequence. Attendance at first class strongly advised. DLS students only.

  • Course #: LSHV-602-01
  • CRN: 23028
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Heck, P.
  • Dates: Jan 08 – May 09, 2020
  • Class Meetings:
  • Syllabus: Download

LSHV-604-01

DLS Foundational 4

Understanding the philosophical basis and ethical responsibilities of research are critical to developing an appreciation for the tenor, methods and conduct of scholarly investigation. What is a hypothesis? What is a thesis? What is a theory, and how do we know that theories are valid? What evidence can we bring to bear to support or refute them? What are possible alternate explanations for the phenomena we observe? And fundamentally how is research engaged in ways that are technically right and morally “good”? This course will introduce students to the basic philosophy of research as a scientific endeavor, and will ground the methods and conduct of such enterprise to an understanding of its apt effort as a human “good”. Concepts of inquiry, investigation and formal analyses will be discussed. Constructs of validity, reliability and value will be addressed. Obligate elements of responsible conduct of research will be detailed, and key ethico-legal issues and problems – and their avoidance and resolution will be provided.

Note: DLS Seminar 4, must take in sequence. Attendance at first class strongly advised.

  • Course #: LSHV-604-01
  • CRN: 24909
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Giordano, J.
  • Dates: Jan 08 – May 09, 2020
  • Class Meetings:
  • Syllabus: Download

LSHV-990-01

DLS Qualifying Exam

This section of DLS Qualifying Exam Prep is intended for students who have enrolled in the program primarily on a part-time basis (3-6 credits per semester) and who intend to complete their DLS Qualifying Exam at a similar pace. This section counts as Half-Time Status. Notes: DLS students only. 36 hrs completed. Student provides exam checklist to Asst. Dean by Sept. 15th. Course certifies half-time status Repeatable course Fall and Spring terms with DLS Director approval

Note: Halftime status. Repeatable in fall and spring terms. DLS students must have 36 earned credit hours prior to the Spring 2018 semester.

  • Course #: LSHV-990-01
  • CRN: 26557
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Glucklich, A.
  • Dates: Jan 08 – May 09, 2020
  • Class Meetings:

LSHV-995-01

DLS Thesis Proposal/Thesis Writing

After successful completion of the Qualifying Examination, the DLS student reviews carefully the The Graduate Liberal Studies Guidelines for Thesis Writers, liberalstudies.georgetown.edu/DLS students/resources/thesis, downloads the DLS Thesis Proposal Form and registers for DLS Thesis Proposal Preparation/Thesis Writing in either the fall or spring term following the successful completion of the DLS Qualifying Examinations. During or prior to that semester the student, with the assistance of the DLS Director as needed, determines the tentative thesis topic and the three faculty members representing research areas appropriate to the topic. These faculty constitute the student’s Doctoral Thesis Committee, a Chair and two Readers. In general the Thesis Proposal includes an explanation and an outline of the topic of study, a preliminary bibliography, a suggested table of contents, and any special methodologies. Upon determining the topic and Thesis Committee and by mid-semester, the student must set a date for the “oral defense” of the completed Thesis Proposal by an examining board whose members are the student’s Thesis Committee and the members of the DLS Executive committee. Upon final approval of the Thesis Proposal the student proceeds with the research and writing of the Doctoral Thesis. Students registered for DLS Thesis Proposal Prep./Thesis Writing are encouraged during that semester to participate in the two session (Saturday and one evening) DLS Thesis Proposal Workshop which is offered once each Fall and Spring semester

Note: Half-time status Repeatable course, Fall and Spring terms.

  • Course #: LSHV-995-01
  • CRN: 20578
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Glucklich, A.
  • Dates: Jan 08 – May 09, 2020
  • Class Meetings:

LSHV-996-01

DLS Thesis Writing

The Doctor of Liberal Studies thesis is expected to demonstrate a level of competence and academic rigor in the field of interdisciplinary studies comparable to, though distinct from, the equivalent level of competence and rigor expected in a Ph.D. thesis in a disciplinary field. Topics are limited to the liberal arts and social sciences and must be approved by the DLS Director. The Doctoral Thesis represents the creative synthesis of primary sources and secondary materials. Students must follow the Graduate Liberal Studies Guidelines for Thesis Writers provided each student upon successful completion of the Qualifying Examination for steps and procedures in the preparation and defense of the Thesis Proposal as well as the submission, defense, and approval of the DLS thesis. The Guidelines are also online, liberalstudies.georgetown.edu/DLS students/resources/thesis. Additionally, the student must follow the “rules” of manuscript preparation according to the methods provided in A Manual for Writers, 8th edition, Kate Turabian, in particular, the choice of one of the two suggested styles for citations.

Note: Half-time status Repeatable course, Fall and Spring terms. Final online Proquest approval is April 15, 2018. following successful Thesis Defense. Must have successfully defended Thesis Proposal on file from previous Fall or Spring semester.

  • Course #: LSHV-996-01
  • CRN: 20579
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Glucklich, A.
  • Dates: Jan 08 – May 09, 2020
  • Class Meetings:

LSHV-513-01   NEW!

Environmental Ethics and Climate Justice

Environmental ethics explores human-nature relationships to question the ecological impact and long-term sustainability of human activities on the planet. Historical, philosophical, sociological, theological, political, and scientific aspects of environmentalism are discussed. Topics include the Anthropocene epoch and human alterations to ecology and climate; environmental matters from economic perspectives; pollution regulation; conservation and wilderness restoration; access to scarce natural resources; poor nations suffering from climate disasters; environmental activism and green movements; animal rights; and genetically modified organisms.

  • Course #: LSHV-513-01
  • CRN: 38920
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Shook, J.
  • Dates: Jan 08 – May 09, 2020
  • Class Meetings:
  • Syllabus: Download

LSHV-988-01

MALS Continuous Reg. (HT)

Note: Must be taken by MALS candidates who have an "Incomplete" in Thesis Writing. No scheduled classes. Do not sign up for this as a substitute for a leave of absence.

  • Course #: LSHV-988-01
  • CRN: 33080
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Sullivan, R.
  • Dates: Jan 08 – May 09, 2020
  • Class Meetings:

LSHV-401-01   NEW!

MALS FND: Norms and Ethics

“Norms and Ethics,” as an MALS foundational course, is intended to “examine basic methods and issues around moral and ethical concerns and enduring challenges of the human pursuit of the good life across cultures” (as defined on the “Curriculum” webpage). The course aims to equip students with intellectual and critical skills utilized across the curriculum. This course examines ethics, human inquiry that investigates the nature of the moral life, norms of right and wrong individual behavior and institutional structures, and the nature of human goods. Most fundamentally, ethics is a way of life—disciplined inquiry into some of the most basic modes of thought and action. Ethics is not mere puritanical counting up “dos” and “don’ts” but about how we shape our actions and behaviors in light of our most basic values, hopes, and goods. We will focus on these issues through a historical and theoretical examination of the major developments in ethics in the Western tradition and by thinking about norms and ethics framed by various concepts (e.g. justice) and areas of application (e.g. political institutions). We will consider comparative analysis, both its possibilities and limits. Religious and philosophical sources will be explored. Coupled with our historical examination of the core ethical traditions, we will explore their application in contemporary situations—personal relationships and individual lives, the workplace, professional settings, healthcare and bio-ethics, the environment, the military, politics, and business.

Note: This course is required for all MALS students.

  • Course #: LSHV-401-01
  • CRN: 38174
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Kessler, M.
  • Dates: Jan 08 – May 09, 2020
  • Class Meetings:
  • Syllabus: Download

LSHV-402-01   NEW!

MALS FND: Social Sciences

This is one of four required foundational courses (humanities, social sciences, science & society, and norms & ethics) offered by the LSP to facilitate graduate-level interdisciplinary study and research throughout the MALS curriculum. They aim to improve your analytical, research, and writing skills so you can realize the full potential of your learning experience throughout the program. They provide a solid intellectual foundation for your elective courses; enhance your ability to conduct research on important issues treated in your other courses; and prepare you for success in your capstone thesis project. This Social Sciences course will first, through assigned and self-selected readings and projects, provide a solid understanding of, and practical experience in, interdisciplinary studies and research methodologies, including qualitative and quantitative. It will examine the relationships between and among the humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences, with regard to both their subject matter and underlying theories. Focusing directly on anthropology, history, economics, psychology, sociology, and political science/international relations, it will explore their distinctive concepts and theories, and how their scholarly practitioners advance interdisciplinary theory and research. Finally, throughout the course we will reflect on how the humanities/social sciences/natural sciences implicate and engage issues of values, norms and ethics.

Note: For MALS students only. This is the third MALS required foundational course.


LSHV-981-01

MALS Thesis Prop. Wksp. (HT)

Effective Fall 2013, (a) this course will carry an automatic program fee of $500, (b) may only be taken once after receiving an "Incomplete" in Thesis Writing, and (c) has been re-numbered from 991/992. If students do not complete Thesis Writing, s/he must register in the next semester in "MALS Thesis Continuous Registration I" which carries a $500 fee charge, is 0-credits and is part-time status. Students may take "MALS Thesis Continuous Reg. I" only once. If the student decides to withdraw from Thesis Writing before the deadline, s/he can pursue the 36-cr./Coursework degree plan. No exceptions will be considered.

Note: This course certifies half-time status. Final thesis proposal approval is May 1, 2020. Repeatable in Fall and Spring terms only. "Course meets 1/23, 2/20, 3/26, and 4/23. Must have completed seven courses (21 credits); must have 3.0 GPA

  • Course #: LSHV-981-01
  • CRN: 26810
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Duke, E.
  • Dates: Jan 08 – May 09, 2020
  • Class Meetings:

LSHV-982-01

MALS Thesis Writing (HT)

Note: Pre-req 27 earned credits and Satisfactory in MALS Thesis Proposal Workshop. Course certifies half-time status.

  • Course #: LSHV-982-01
  • CRN: 33079
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Sullivan, R.
  • Dates: Jan 08 – May 09, 2020
  • Class Meetings:

LSHV-525-01

Religious Freedom & Supreme Court

This course examines the intersection/symbiosis/clash of law and religion in the United States from Colonial times through the present, to include the most recent Supreme Court decisions. We begin with an examination of the historical antecedents of the two Religion Clauses of the First Amendment -- the anti-establishment clause, which prohibits government action respecting "establishment" of religion (yet expressly avoids definition of that term); and the free exercise clause, which proscribes governmental prohibition of the “free exercise” thereof (while expressly avoiding definition of that term as well). How can we square these two freedoms? And what exactly constitutes "religion"? The Constitution is silent. We must look elsewhere for guidance – elsewhere is the United States Supreme Court.

  • Course #: LSHV-525-01
  • CRN: 38770
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Quirk, R.
  • Dates: Jan 08 – May 09, 2020
  • Class Meetings:
    • Thu 6:30 PM - 9:00 PM, Car Barn, Room 172
  • Syllabus: Download

LSHV-377-01

U.S. Cults: Religious Extremism and the Search for Meaning

Religious extremism is a reaction to the perceived chaos and loneliness of modern life, and un-derstanding why people join and how people leave is crucial. This course will take a socio-psychological approach to understanding how cults in America originate, who is attracted to join-ing, and the legal issues cults generate. We will explore such issues as: -Are cults protected under ‘religious liberty’ laws? -What defines a religion? -Why are some cults prone to violence? -Is ‘brainwashing’ an actual phenomenon? -Are cults always ‘bad’?

Note: Religious extremism is a reaction to the perceived chaos and loneliness of modern life, and un-derstanding why people join and how people leave is crucial. This course will take a socio-psychological approach to understanding how cults in America originate, who is attracted to join-ing, and the legal issues cults generate. We will explore such issues as: -Are cults protected under ‘religious liberty’ laws? -What defines a religion? -Why are some cults prone to violence? -Is ‘brainwashing’ an actual phenomenon? -Are cults always ‘bad’?

  • Course #: LSHV-377-01
  • CRN: 38176
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Steenhuisen, L.
  • Dates: Jan 08 – May 09, 2020
  • Class Meetings:
  • Syllabus: Download

LSHV-486-01

Untangling the Middle East

All too often the problematic of the Middle East is considered from too narrow a viewpoint. Many are the experts and authorities who understand the ins and outs of Arab culture or of Islam or of the Israelis or the Iraqis or the Egyptians. Rarely if ever does one encounter a discussion that encompasses the extraordinary array of complications that interweave each other to yield an answer to the question as to why this is such a difficult region of the world. The intention of this course is to do that: to make accessible to an intelligent reader and auditor that array of complications. As such my intention is to offer a primer: each of the areas encompassed can be studied in greater detail through further discussion or reading. My goal is not to propose a given solution, in fact, but to explore and explain the problem as a starting point for thinking about solutions. My hope is also to present different issues evenhandedly, from different perspectives, which is a second flaw I find in most presentations of the region: that they are two one-sided, whether obviously or subtly.

  • Course #: LSHV-486-01
  • CRN: 38177
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Soltes, O.
  • Dates: Jan 08 – May 09, 2020
  • Class Meetings:
  • Syllabus: Download