Doctor of Liberal Studies

On-Campus Course Schedule for Fall 2021

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LSHV-367-01

Foundation: Alienation and Self-Identity

In the last two hundred years, Europeans and Americans have frequently used the notion of alienation in conceiving of themselves. In fact, we might characterize these two centuries as a time in which, paradoxically enough, humans’ identity has been integrally linked with being, in some sense, ‘strange.’ The course will attempt to make sense of the many links and tensions between alienation and self-identity -- or strangeness and the self -- by examining strong voices in the development of the contemporary identity. While we will discuss all of the works in class, primary responsibility for composing a theory of the complex relationship between alienation and identity will rest upon the participants in the course. All written assignments will offer opportunities to articulate and develop those theories, as will class discussion and class presentations. The course will culminate in an examination of the artist Lucas Samaras for his modeling of the strange self.

  • Course #: LSHV-367-01
  • CRN: 40272
  • Instructor: Ruf, F.
  • Dates: Aug 25 – Dec 17, 2021
  • Class Meetings:
    • Wed 6:30 PM - 9:00 PM

LSHV-911-04

DLS Directed Reading/Research

  • Course #: LSHV-911-04
  • CRN: 41140
  • Instructor: Steenhuisen, L.
  • Dates: Aug 25 – Dec 17, 2021
  • Class Meetings:

LSHV-911-03

DLS Directed Reading/Research

  • Course #: LSHV-911-03
  • CRN: 41139
  • Instructor: Giordano, J.
  • Dates: Aug 25 – Dec 17, 2021
  • Class Meetings:

LSHV-911-05

DLS Directed Reading/Research

  • Course #: LSHV-911-05
  • CRN: 41158
  • Instructor: Ferris, E.
  • Dates: Aug 25 – Dec 17, 2021
  • Class Meetings:

LSHV-911-06

DLS Directed Reading/Research

  • Course #: LSHV-911-06
  • CRN: 41207
  • Instructor: Giordano, J.
  • Dates: Aug 25 – Dec 17, 2021
  • Class Meetings:

LSHV-911-01

DLS Directed Reading/Research

  • Course #: LSHV-911-01
  • CRN: 40869
  • Instructor: Shook, J.
  • Dates: Aug 25 – Dec 17, 2021
  • Class Meetings:

LSHV-911-02

DLS Directed Reading/Research

  • Course #: LSHV-911-02
  • CRN: 41130
  • Instructor: Steenhuisen, L.
  • Dates: Aug 25 – Dec 17, 2021
  • Class Meetings:

LSHV-601-01

DLS Foundational 1

This course introduces the student to the history, rationale, and focus of graduate Liberal Studies as a doctoral field. It provides a framework for the entering doctoral student in terms of establishing the foundations and interdisciplinary focus of graduate work in the field. There are three stages to the course. (1) It begins with a broad overview of the pre-modern Western tradition, with guest lectures and readings from the classical to the early modern eras, designed to provide historical context for the emergence of modernity in the Western tradition. (2) In the second part, the emphasis shifts to methodology and research as a way of preparing the entering doctoral student for graduate Liberal Studies at Georgetown University. Readings and additional guest lectures help the student develop a fuller sense of how particular disciplines function within the context of interdisciplinary analysis. (3) The final section of the course involves an in-class workshop on research methods and then a final set of round table student presentations on their research topics for the term paper. The research topic will be chosen, in consultation with the professor, so the student can explore some aspect of his/her stated area of interest for the D.L.S

Note: DLS students only.

  • Course #: LSHV-601-01
  • CRN: 35165
  • Instructor: Soltes, O.
  • Dates: Aug 25 – Dec 17, 2021
  • Class Meetings:
    • Mon 6:30 PM - 9:00 PM

LSHV-603-01

DLS Foundational 3

Students in the DLS program are joining a centuries-long series of conversations and heated debates concerning the deceptively simple questions that lie at the heart of Liberal Studies, philosophical inquiry, and human values: How do we know? How do we make meaning out of the world and experience? How do we represent reality? How do we interpret reality? How do we form and rewrite traditions of knowledge, language, and power? What does it mean to live a good life? In the third DLS core course, students will continue to explore how these questions have been posed and answers have been attempted in the modern and postmodern critical contexts (19th through early 21st century), centuries that have seen striking changes from positivist, humanist outlooks upon the world shift to deconstruction and “posthuman” perspectives. We will explore these questions through a series of paired readings in fiction and critical theory, divided into interrelated thematic units of signs, gender theory, ecocriticism and critical race theory. Our readings will focus on works that question and rewrite master narratives, explore the nature of subjectivity, the limits of self and other, and history and fiction. At the end of the semester, students will be familiar with some of the major currents in critical theory.

Note: DLS students only. This course is held via Zoom and requires attendance at all weekly Zoom class meetings. This course does not meet in person on campus.

  • Course #: LSHV-603-01
  • CRN: 35167
  • Instructor: Francomano, E.
  • Dates: Aug 25 – Dec 17, 2021
  • Class Meetings:
    • Tue 6:30 PM - 9:00 PM

LSHV-990-01

DLS Qualifying Exam

This section of DLS Qualifying Exam Prep is intended for students who have enrolled in the program primarily on a part-time basis (3-6 credits per semester) and who intend to complete their DLS Qualifying Exam at a similar pace. This section counts as Half-Time Status. Notes: DLS students only. 36 hrs completed. Student provides exam checklist to Asst. Dean by Sept. 15th. Course certifies half-time status Repeatable course Fall and Spring terms with DLS Director approval

Note: DLS students register for this course after completing all 36 credits of coursework. This course must be successfully completed before students can progress to DLS Thesis Proposal and DLS Thesis Writing.

  • Course #: LSHV-990-01
  • CRN: 26239
  • Instructor: McNelis, C.
  • Dates: Aug 25 – Dec 17, 2021
  • Class Meetings:

LSHV-995-01

DLS Thesis Proposal/Thesis Writing

After completing the DLS Qualifying Exams (LSHV 990), students are required to register for DLS Thesis Proposal (LSHV 995) before moving on to DLS Thesis Writing (LSHV 996) the following semester.

Note: DLS students must complete this course before progressing to DLS Thesis Writing.

  • Course #: LSHV-995-01
  • CRN: 20361
  • Instructor: McNelis, C.
  • Dates: Aug 25 – Dec 17, 2021
  • Class Meetings:

LSHV-996-01

DLS Thesis Writing

The Doctor of Liberal Studies thesis is expected to demonstrate a level of competence and academic rigor in the field of interdisciplinary studies comparable to, though distinct from, the equivalent level of competence and rigor expected in a Ph.D. thesis in a disciplinary field. Topics are limited to the liberal arts and social sciences and must be approved by the DLS Director. The Doctoral Thesis represents the creative synthesis of primary sources and secondary materials. Students must follow the Graduate Liberal Studies Guidelines for Thesis Writers provided each student upon successful completion of the Qualifying Examination for steps and procedures in the preparation and defense of the Thesis Proposal as well as the submission, defense, and approval of the DLS thesis. The Guidelines are also online, liberalstudies.georgetown.edu/DLS students/resources/thesis. Additionally, the student must follow the “rules” of manuscript preparation according to the methods provided in A Manual for Writers, 8th edition, Kate Turabian, in particular, the choice of one of the two suggested styles for citations.

Note: This is the final step in the DLS thesis process. Students must register for this course in both fall and spring to remain active while writing the doctoral thesis.

  • Course #: LSHV-996-01
  • CRN: 20362
  • Instructor: McNelis, C.
  • Dates: Aug 25 – Dec 17, 2021
  • Class Meetings:

LSHV-514-01

Forbidden Texts

Note: This course is a seminar exploration of forbidden texts, defined broadly, through in-depth examination of texts which were banned at some point, somewhere, in some fashion. The class will analyze each text’s social context, authorship, reasons for censorship or scandal, and historical legacy. Concurrently, we will examine how the scholarly literature has evaluated the works in question; fit them into a historical framework; and constructed various theories as to what constitutes a text worth forbidding. Following analysis of such cases, students should be able to construct a typology of factors which might render a work controversial, and test that typology against an outlined creation of their own.

  • Course #: LSHV-514-01
  • CRN: 40275
  • Instructor: Al-Tikriti, N.
  • Dates: Aug 25 – Dec 17, 2021
  • Class Meetings:
    • Thu 6:30 PM - 9:00 PM

LSHV-988-01

MALS Continuous Reg. (HT)

Note: Continuous Registration must be taken by MALS candidates who have an Incomplete in Thesis Writing. No scheduled classes. Final Thesis approval due date is Nov. 1, 2017. Course certifies 1/2 time status.

  • Course #: LSHV-988-01
  • CRN: 32505
  • Instructor: Sullivan, R.
  • Dates: Aug 25 – Dec 17, 2021
  • Class Meetings:

LSHV-400-01

MALS FND: Science and Society

The history of science and its ongoing discoveries are surveyed, to track methods of empirical inquiry and examine major impacts of scientific theories on the understanding of humans, our capabilities, and our interactions with each other and the world. Scientific and humanistic perspectives upon being human, and on trying to be more human, are often deeply divergent. Yet the methods of scientific inquiry are as cognitively and creatively human as any endeavor we undertake, for better comprehending our humanity and our place in the world. Through the standpoint of science, and innovations in technosciences, it is possible to reimagine and reinterpret how we experience life and engage with the social world. Scientific advances powerfully interact with the cultural context of moral norms, social institutions, political forces, and legal regulations, which in turn shape the utilization of emerging technosciences. This course examines these engagements from the 1940s to the present day and into the perceivable near-future. The course emphasizes the public understanding of science and technology, ethical viewpoints on important technosciences, and broader social impacts due to technoscience on global scales.

Note: For MALS students only. This is the first MALS required foundational course.

  • Course #: LSHV-400-01
  • CRN: 36655
  • Instructor: Shook, J.
  • Dates: Aug 25 – Dec 17, 2021
  • Class Meetings:
    • Tue 6:30 PM - 9:00 PM

LSHV-402-01

MALS FND: Social Sciences

This is one of four required foundational courses (humanities, social sciences, science & society, and norms & ethics) offered by the LSP to facilitate graduate-level interdisciplinary study and research throughout the MALS curriculum. They aim to improve your analytical, research, and writing skills so you can realize the full potential of your learning experience throughout the program. They provide a solid intellectual foundation for your elective courses; enhance your ability to conduct research on important issues treated in your other courses; and prepare you for success in your capstone thesis project. This Social Sciences course will first, through assigned and self-selected readings and projects, provide a solid understanding of, and practical experience in, interdisciplinary studies and research methodologies, including qualitative and quantitative. It will examine the relationships between and among the humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences, with regard to both their subject matter and underlying theories. Focusing directly on anthropology, history, economics, psychology, sociology, and political science/international relations, it will explore their distinctive concepts and theories, and how their scholarly practitioners advance interdisciplinary theory and research. Finally, throughout the course we will reflect on how the humanities/social sciences/natural sciences implicate and engage issues of values, norms and ethics.

Note: This course is required for MALS students.

  • Course #: LSHV-402-01
  • CRN: 40857
  • Instructor: Gray, M.
  • Dates: Aug 25 – Dec 17, 2021
  • Class Meetings:
    • Wed 6:30 PM - 9:00 PM
  • Syllabus: Download

LSHV-800-01

MALS Thesis Proposal

During the MALS Thesis Proposal course, students work directly with the Master of Arts in Liberal Studies faculty director to produce an annotated bibliography (including the state of the question and the 20 most important works on the topic) and thesis statement, which prepare students for thesis writing in the subsequent semester. Students are expected to attend all class sessions, meetings with the University librarians for research consultations and any additional meetings determined by the faculty director.

Note: This is the first required course in the MALS thesis process for students who matriculated during or after fall 2019. Students must successfully complete this course before advancing to the final required course, MALS Thesis Writing (LSHV 801).

  • Course #: LSHV-800-01
  • CRN: 39352
  • Instructor: Francomano, E.
  • Dates: Aug 25 – Dec 17, 2021
  • Class Meetings:

LSHV-801-01

MALS Thesis Writing

The MALS Thesis Writing course must be taken upon completion of the MALS Thesis Proposal course (LSHV 800) in the subsequent fall or spring semester and is the final curricular requirement for the Master of Arts in Liberal Studies degree. In the MALS Thesis Writing course, students will work directly with their appointed thesis mentor to produce a master’s thesis and participate in a thesis defense. Students are expected to work directly with their thesis mentor and library representatives to actively write and produce the thesis argument. At the commencement of the thesis writing semester, students will develop milestones in consultation with the thesis mentor to ensure consistent progress.

Note: This course is required for all MALS students and can only be taken after all coursework is complete.

  • Course #: LSHV-801-01
  • CRN: 40276
  • Instructor: Francomano, E.
  • Dates: Aug 25 – Dec 17, 2021
  • Class Meetings:

LSHV-415-01

Responsibility, Ethics, Life

The notion of responsibility is a core moral category and cuts across a wide range of practical moral problems. This course will investigate the nature of responsibility in ethics, with attention to its historical meaning in philosophy and theology and the major role it plays in a few key modern figures like Kant, particularly the idea of moral agency and imputation. Relatedly we will explore the role of responsibility in modern theological ethics (Schweiker, Jonas, etc.) and the connections to technology. Then we will explore responsibility in a few key moral areas, including: a) the notion of "professional responsibility" in the professions, b) the notion of "corporate responsibility," c) "responsibility to protect" in human rights and international affairs, d) responsibility for others in the idea of global solidarity, e) responsibility for the environment/climate, and f) responsibility toward integrity in craft and work. Attention will be paid to cross-cultural conceptualizations of responsibility.

Note: This course can be applied to MALS Foundational: Norms and Ethics (LSHV 401). Please email your advisor if you have any questions about your curricular requirements (ls-advising@georgetown.edu).

  • Course #: LSHV-415-01
  • CRN: 40568
  • Instructor: Kessler, M.
  • Dates: Aug 25 – Dec 17, 2021
  • Class Meetings:
    • Mon 6:30 PM - 9:00 PM

LSHV-476-01

The GlobalSouth:Pltcs,Lit,Film

Note: This course looks at the geographical, cultural, and political notion of a "Global South" through the lens of literature and film. The term "Global South" is a geographical reference to regions that have large inequalities in living standards, life expectancy, and access to resources. However, should the Global South just be reduced to a metaphor for underdevelopment and poverty? To answer this question, we will explore the ways in which the Global South, especially its politics, is represented and described in literature and film from regions as diverse as the Caribbean, Africa, South Asia, and Oceania. We will examine whether literary and cinematic representations reinforce, transform, or disrupt notions of a developing Global South. In doing so, we will also consider and interrogate the idea of a “developed” Global North.

  • Course #: LSHV-476-01
  • CRN: 36552
  • Instructor: Goswami, S.
  • Dates: Aug 25 – Dec 17, 2021
  • Class Meetings:
    • Wed 6:30 PM - 9:00 PM

LSHV-480-01

The Reflective Professional

The mission of the School of Continuing Studies at Georgetown University is to “deliver a world-class, values-based education to a diverse array of communities and individuals throughout their academic and professional careers” guided by a value of “exemplifying Georgetown’s shared Jesuit values.” But what are these Jesuit values? Why do they matter in your education at Georgetown SCS? And how do you put them into action in your professional lives? These questions feel more urgent today as reflective professional are being called upon in every sector of professional practice to address longstanding barriers to economic and social justice. The pandemic continues to shed a light on these challenges and invites a more generous response from our graduates rooted in our University mission and values. This popular course, offered annually since 2016 as “Jesuit Values in Professional Practice,” is an interdisciplinary journey into mission-driven leadership and explores the concepts, application, and implications of leadership theory grounded in Jesuit spirituality. The course is open to any degree-seeking SCS student as an open elective and embraces a “whole person” approach to education by including regular personal and communal reflection, presentations by mission-driven leaders at Georgetown and beyond, and direct community service opportunities facilitated by Georgetown’s Center for Social Justice, Research, Teaching & Service. Questions? Reach out to course faculty and SCS Associate Director for Mission Integration, Jamie Kralovec (pjk34@georgetown.edu).

Note: This course is open to all SCS students.

  • Course #: LSHV-480-01
  • CRN: 40526
  • Instructor: Kralovec, P.
  • Dates: Aug 25 – Dec 17, 2021
  • Class Meetings:
    • Thu 5:20 PM - 7:50 PM