Course Schedule for Spring 2018


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LSHV-457-01

60's: Decade of Transformation

Note: Graduate Liberal Studies students, only. Attendance at first class session is strongly advised. Follow Mon/Wed rule. First class session is Wed., Jan. 10. The 2nd class session meets Mon., Jan. 22.


LSHV-911-05

DLS Directed Reading/Research

The Directed Reading course requires that a professor determine with the student the nature and number of reading materials and research required to satisfy the goal of that particular course. Students may further strengthen their reading and their pending thesis through the creation of no more than three Directed Reading courses, and no more than two of these courses with the same professor, after consultation with and approval by the DLS Director. The Directed Reading course professor must hold an advanced degree beyond the master’s level. Upon completion and approval of the Directed Reading course proposal by the professor and the DLS Director, the student forwards the form with approvals to the GLSP Assistant Dean who sets up the course with the Registrar and requests enrollment of the student.

  • Course #: LSHV-911-05
  • CRN: 34924
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: TBD
  • Dates: Jan 10 – May 12, 2018
  • Class Meetings:

LSHV-911-02

DLS Directed Reading/Research

The Directed Reading course requires that a professor determine with the student the nature and number of reading materials and research required to satisfy the goal of that particular course. Students may further strengthen their reading and their pending thesis through the creation of no more than three Directed Reading courses, and no more than two of these courses with the same professor, after consultation with and approval by the DLS Director. The Directed Reading course professor must hold an advanced degree beyond the master’s level. Upon completion and approval of the Directed Reading course proposal by the professor and the DLS Director, the student forwards the form with approvals to the GLSP Assistant Dean who sets up the course with the Registrar and requests enrollment of the student.

  • Course #: LSHV-911-02
  • CRN: 34918
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Giordano, J.
  • Dates: Jan 10 – May 12, 2018
  • Class Meetings:

LSHV-911-03

DLS Directed Reading/Research

The Directed Reading course requires that a professor determine with the student the nature and number of reading materials and research required to satisfy the goal of that particular course. Students may further strengthen their reading and their pending thesis through the creation of no more than three Directed Reading courses, and no more than two of these courses with the same professor, after consultation with and approval by the DLS Director. The Directed Reading course professor must hold an advanced degree beyond the master’s level. Upon completion and approval of the Directed Reading course proposal by the professor and the DLS Director, the student forwards the form with approvals to the GLSP Assistant Dean who sets up the course with the Registrar and requests enrollment of the student.

  • Course #: LSHV-911-03
  • CRN: 34919
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: North, P.
  • Dates: Jan 10 – May 12, 2018
  • Class Meetings:

LSHV-911-01

DLS Directed Reading/Research

The Directed Reading course requires that a professor determine with the student the nature and number of reading materials and research required to satisfy the goal of that particular course. Students may further strengthen their reading and their pending thesis through the creation of no more than three Directed Reading courses, and no more than two of these courses with the same professor, after consultation with and approval by the DLS Director. The Directed Reading course professor must hold an advanced degree beyond the master’s level. Upon completion and approval of the Directed Reading course proposal by the professor and the DLS Director, the student forwards the form with approvals to the GLSP Assistant Dean who sets up the course with the Registrar and requests enrollment of the student.

  • Course #: LSHV-911-01
  • CRN: 34917
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Reynolds, T.
  • Dates: Jan 10 – May 12, 2018
  • Class Meetings:

LSHV-911-04

DLS Directed Reading/Research

The Directed Reading course requires that a professor determine with the student the nature and number of reading materials and research required to satisfy the goal of that particular course. Students may further strengthen their reading and their pending thesis through the creation of no more than three Directed Reading courses, and no more than two of these courses with the same professor, after consultation with and approval by the DLS Director. The Directed Reading course professor must hold an advanced degree beyond the master’s level. Upon completion and approval of the Directed Reading course proposal by the professor and the DLS Director, the student forwards the form with approvals to the GLSP Assistant Dean who sets up the course with the Registrar and requests enrollment of the student.

  • Course #: LSHV-911-04
  • CRN: 34920
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: TBD
  • Dates: Jan 10 – May 12, 2018
  • Class Meetings:

LSHV-602-01

DLS Foundational Love, Death, and God: From the Bible through the Renaissance

“The approach taken in the Foundational courses is primarily historical….their goal is to make the student aware of the complex historical dynamics of cultural evolution by careful analysis of selected episodes of important cultural conflict, continuity, and change, so as to identify the multiple interactions of the subject matters of traditional academic disciplines in such episodes…Such interdisciplinary inquiry is designed to produce a style of questioning that more realistically corresponds to the actual dynamics of human cultural development throughout history.” Handbook, p. 9 In this course we will focus on the relationship between text and context in Europe within a global framework. The discipline of history investigates the ways in which human society experiences change and continuity. It provides, through generations of historians, working, for the most part, in a collegial fashion, an increasingly complex context for understanding the human story. The thematic focus of the course will be on the interaction of rulers and religion, what is today called the relationship between church and state. The organization of the course is around texts and contexts between the time of the Roman Empire to the early modern period in European history as we approach the rise of religious toleration and the Enlightenment.

Note: DLS Seminar 2, must take in sequence. Attendance at first class strongly advised. DLS students only.

  • Course #: LSHV-602-01
  • CRN: 23028
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Moran Cruz, J.
  • Dates: Jan 10 – May 12, 2018
  • Class Meetings:

LSHV-990-02

DLS Qualifying Exam

This section of DLS Qualifying Exam Prep is intended for students who have enrolled in the program primarily on a part-time basis (3-6 credits per semester) and who intend to complete their DLS Qualifying Exam at a similar pace. This section counts as Half-Time Status. Notes: DLS students only. 36 hrs completed. Student provides exam checklist to Asst. Dean by Sept. 15th. Course certifies half-time status Repeatable course Fall and Spring terms with DLS Director approval

Note: Course certifies Full-Time status. Repeatable in Fall and Spring terms with DLS director approval. DLS students must have 36 earned credit hours prior to the Spring 2018 semester. Full-time status carries an automatic Health Insurance Fee. Contact Student Health Services if requesting a waiver.


LSHV-990-01

DLS Qualifying Exam

This section of DLS Qualifying Exam Prep is intended for students who have enrolled in the program primarily on a part-time basis (3-6 credits per semester) and who intend to complete their DLS Qualifying Exam at a similar pace. This section counts as Half-Time Status. Notes: DLS students only. 36 hrs completed. Student provides exam checklist to Asst. Dean by Sept. 15th. Course certifies half-time status Repeatable course Fall and Spring terms with DLS Director approval

Note: Halftime status. Repeatable in fall and spring terms. DLS students must have 36 earned credit hours prior to the Spring 2018 semester.


LSHV-604-01

DLS Foundational The Challenge of Postmodernism

The fourth and final required foundational course focuses on the period from roughly 1850 to the present, loosely characterized as “postmodern.” This course covers issues from an interdisciplinary perspective because the realities of cultural evolution and conflict demonstrate the interaction of economic, political, religious, moral, scientific and aesthetic forces, as well as other factors peculiar to particular societies and time periods. Specific topics, texts, thematic emphases, and approaches to these periods may vary. Course may not be repeated for credit. Pre-Requisites: LSHV 601; LSHV 602; LSHV 603

Note: DLS Seminar 4, must take in sequence. Attendance at first class strongly advised.


LSHV-995-01

DLS Thesis Proposal/Thesis Writing

After successful completion of the Qualifying Examination, the DLS student reviews carefully the The Graduate Liberal Studies Guidelines for Thesis Writers, liberalstudies.georgetown.edu/DLS students/resources/thesis, downloads the DLS Thesis Proposal Form and registers for DLS Thesis Proposal Preparation/Thesis Writing in either the fall or spring term following the successful completion of the DLS Qualifying Examinations. During or prior to that semester the student, with the assistance of the DLS Director as needed, determines the tentative thesis topic and the three faculty members representing research areas appropriate to the topic. These faculty constitute the student’s Doctoral Thesis Committee, a Chair and two Readers. In general the Thesis Proposal includes an explanation and an outline of the topic of study, a preliminary bibliography, a suggested table of contents, and any special methodologies. Upon determining the topic and Thesis Committee and by mid-semester, the student must set a date for the “oral defense” of the completed Thesis Proposal by an examining board whose members are the student’s Thesis Committee and the members of the DLS Executive committee. Upon final approval of the Thesis Proposal the student proceeds with the research and writing of the Doctoral Thesis. Students registered for DLS Thesis Proposal Prep./Thesis Writing are encouraged during that semester to participate in the two session (Saturday and one evening) DLS Thesis Proposal Workshop which is offered once each Fall and Spring semester

Note: Half-time status Repeatable course, Fall and Spring terms.

  • Course #: LSHV-995-01
  • CRN: 20578
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Glucklich, A.
  • Dates: Jan 10 – May 12, 2018
  • Class Meetings:

LSHV-996-01

DLS Thesis Writing

The Doctor of Liberal Studies thesis is expected to demonstrate a level of competence and academic rigor in the field of interdisciplinary studies comparable to, though distinct from, the equivalent level of competence and rigor expected in a Ph.D. thesis in a disciplinary field. Topics are limited to the liberal arts and social sciences and must be approved by the DLS Director. The Doctoral Thesis represents the creative synthesis of primary sources and secondary materials. Students must follow the Graduate Liberal Studies Guidelines for Thesis Writers provided each student upon successful completion of the Qualifying Examination for steps and procedures in the preparation and defense of the Thesis Proposal as well as the submission, defense, and approval of the DLS thesis. The Guidelines are also online, liberalstudies.georgetown.edu/DLS students/resources/thesis. Additionally, the student must follow the “rules” of manuscript preparation according to the methods provided in A Manual for Writers, 8th edition, Kate Turabian, in particular, the choice of one of the two suggested styles for citations.

Note: Half-time status Repeatable course, Fall and Spring terms. Final online Proquest approval is April 15, 2018. following successful Thesis Defense. Must have successfully defended Thesis Proposal on file from previous Fall or Spring semester.

  • Course #: LSHV-996-01
  • CRN: 20579
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Glucklich, A.
  • Dates: Jan 10 – May 12, 2018
  • Class Meetings:

LSHV-996-02

DLS Thesis Writing

The Doctor of Liberal Studies thesis is expected to demonstrate a level of competence and academic rigor in the field of interdisciplinary studies comparable to, though distinct from, the equivalent level of competence and rigor expected in a Ph.D. thesis in a disciplinary field. Topics are limited to the liberal arts and social sciences and must be approved by the DLS Director. The Doctoral Thesis represents the creative synthesis of primary sources and secondary materials. Students must follow the Graduate Liberal Studies Guidelines for Thesis Writers provided each student upon successful completion of the Qualifying Examination for steps and procedures in the preparation and defense of the Thesis Proposal as well as the submission, defense, and approval of the DLS thesis. The Guidelines are also online, liberalstudies.georgetown.edu/DLS students/resources/thesis. Additionally, the student must follow the “rules” of manuscript preparation according to the methods provided in A Manual for Writers, 8th edition, Kate Turabian, in particular, the choice of one of the two suggested styles for citations.

Note: Course certifies Full-Time status. Repeatable in Fall and Spring terms. Final online Proquest approval is April 15, 2018 following successful Thesis defense. Full-time status carries an automatic Health Insurance Fee. Contact Student Health Services if requesting a waiver. Must have successfully defended Thesis Proposal in previous semester.

  • Course #: LSHV-996-02
  • CRN: 30211
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Glucklich, A.
  • Dates: Jan 10 – May 12, 2018
  • Class Meetings:

LSHV-450-01

Cyberethics

The wide range of human activities now taking place in cyberspace raises classic as well as novel ethical, legal and social issues. Social media such as Facebook and Twitter and many issues related to the active presence of the internet in general, have outstripped the bounds of any moral consensus or U.S. case law related to property, privacy and confidentiality for example. In addition, there is a growing body of information about harms and abuses that take place in cyberspace. Cybercrime and the possibility of cyber attack have galvanized both governments and citizens of the world. This course approaches these issues as areas of inquiry within philosophical ethics. It begins with basic information about ethical theories and principles and then proceeds to an examination of the various cyber modalities, one by one. Careful analysis of the relevant ethical issues including the development of ethical arguments will shed light on the question of how should we respond to the opportunities and challenges presented in cyberspace? In addition, legal cases that do exist will be considered. The course will have a strong values component, a global orientation and also provide ample opportunity for creative thought and active participation on the part of students.

Note: Graduate Liberal Studies students only. Attendance at first class session strongly advised.

  • Course #: LSHV-450-01
  • CRN: 33780
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: White, G.
  • Dates: Jan 10 – May 12, 2018
  • Class Meetings:
  • Syllabus: Download

LSHV-378-01

Path to the Future: The U.S. in the 21st Century World

In 1941, the publisher Henry Luce predicted the coming of what he called the “American Century.” According to Luce, the time had arrived for Americans “to accept wholeheartedly our duty and our opportunity as the most powerful and vital nation of the world and in consequence to assert upon the world the full impact of our influence, for such means as we see fit.” In the decades that followed, many Americans enthusiastically accepted this challenge and the remaining decades of the 20th century bore witness to their efforts. But what have been the consequences for the United States, and the world, in the “present”? Although much of the attention directed toward US foreign policy in the last several years has been focused the “War on Terrorism,” a vast number of other significant issues also present the United States with challenges and opportunities in the 21st century. While not ignoring the “War on Terrorism,” this course also will examine some of the other areas of policy as a means of assessing the current global status of the United States and providing insight regarding its “path to the future.”

Note: Attendance at first class strongly advised. Follow Mon/Wed rule. First class session is Wed, Jan. 17. Graduate Liberal Studies students only.

  • Course #: LSHV-378-01
  • CRN: 31900
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Wall, M.
  • Dates: Jan 10 – May 12, 2018
  • Class Meetings:
  • Syllabus: Download

LSHV-431-01

The Politics of Gender in World Religions

In what ways is gender socially constructed? How does religion provide the theological matrix for conceptions of gender norms? This course will explore such questions by analyzing the theological context for the construction of gender in world religions. We will analyze, for example, issues of ritual impurity and Torah fulfillment in Judaism, what Buddhism looks like ‘after patriarchy’, and Qur’anic egalitarianism. The dynamic force of “fundamentalism” in contemporary world religions will be examined, and we will answer the question: Why do women choose more restrictive religious paths when more open paths are available? We will also examine how religion serves as a cultural system, offering its own political aims, both liberalizing and conservatizing, with regard to gender.

Note: Graduate Liberal Studies students only. Attendance at first class session strongly advised.


LSHV-464-01

Gandhi's India

This course will survey the philosophical and cultural foundations of Gandhi's work and political action. It will salute Gandhi in the explosive context of the national upheaval and social unrest that characterized the middle years of the twentieth century in India. Students will then look at the way Hindu philosophy and religion has treated conflict and the possibility of peaceful political action in the course of three millennia. The class will read some of the sacred texts that influenced the thought of Gandhi and explore Hindu ethics in some detail. Through texts, films, lectures, and discussion, students will develop an appreciation for Gandhi's unique intellectual synthesis and creativity, and will learn to look at contemporary South Asian issues through the lens of Gandhian ethics.

Note: Graduate Liberal Studies students only. Attendance at first class session strongly advised.

  • Course #: LSHV-464-01
  • CRN: 33782
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Glucklich, A.
  • Dates: Jan 10 – May 12, 2018
  • Class Meetings:

LSHV-988-01

MALS Continuous Reg. (HT)

Note: Must be taken by MALS candidates who have an "Incomplete" in Thesis Writing. No scheduled classes. Final thesis approval date is 4/1/18.

  • Course #: LSHV-988-01
  • CRN: 33080
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Dolan, J.
  • Dates: Jan 10 – May 12, 2018
  • Class Meetings:

LSHV-983-01

MALS Thesis Prop. Wksp. (FT)

Note: This course certifies full-time credit. Full-time status carries an automatic Health Ins. Fee. Contact Student Health Services if requesting a waiver. Needs Department Approval

  • Course #: LSHV-983-01
  • CRN: 33081
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Duke, E.
  • Dates: Jan 10 – May 12, 2018
  • Class Meetings:

LSHV-981-01

MALS Thesis Prop. Wksp. (HT)

Effective Fall 2013, (a) this course will carry an automatic program fee of $500, (b) may only be taken once after receiving an "Incomplete" in Thesis Writing, and (c) has been re-numbered from 991/992. If students do not complete Thesis Writing, s/he must register in the next semester in "MALS Thesis Continuous Registration I" which carries a $500 fee charge, is 0-credits and is part-time status. Students may take "MALS Thesis Continuous Reg. I" only once. If the student decides to withdraw from Thesis Writing before the deadline, s/he can pursue the 36-cr./Coursework degree plan. No exceptions will be considered.

Note: This course certifies half-time status. Final thesis proposal approval is May 1st, 2018. Repeatable in Fall and Spring terms only. "Course meets 1/25, 2/22, 3/29, and 4/26. Must have completed seven courses (21 credits); must have 3.0 GPA.


LSHV-984-01

MALS Thesis Writing (FT)

Note: Course certifies full-time status. Needs Department Approval

  • Course #: LSHV-984-01
  • CRN: 33082
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Dolan, J.
  • Dates: Jan 10 – May 12, 2018
  • Class Meetings:

LSHV-982-01

MALS Thesis Writing (HT)

Note: Pre-req 27 earned credits and Satisfactory in MALS Thesis Proposal Workshop. Course certifies half-time status.

  • Course #: LSHV-982-01
  • CRN: 33079
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Dolan, J.
  • Dates: Jan 10 – May 12, 2018
  • Class Meetings:

LSHV-406-01

Postcolonial Fiction and Film

In a broad sense, postcolonialism deals with the (after)effects of European colonization on cultures and societies. In this course, we will consider the historical, political, moral, and cultural context of European colonialism and its immense impact on fiction and film from around the world. Although not ‘postcolonial,’ we will begin by reading Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness, a fictional narrative written in the heydays of colonialism, as a means to understand the profound and inescapable effects of colonization. We will then read fiction from Africa and South Asia in order to explore how such historical and political fissures as the Partition of India in 1947, the policy of Apartheid in South Africa, the Mau Mau uprising in Kenya, and the birth of postcolonial nations such as Botswana and Pakistan, among others, have played a significant role in shaping the ethics and values of fictional narratives which have emerged from these diverse locations. In addition, we will also watch films from and about Africa and South Asia as a means to further facilitate our discussions about postcolonialism.

Note: Graduate Liberal Studies students, only. Attendance at first class session is strongly advised.

  • Course #: LSHV-406-01
  • CRN: 33778
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Goswami, S.
  • Dates: Jan 10 – May 12, 2018
  • Class Meetings:
  • Syllabus: Download