Course Schedule for Fall 2017


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MPHR-503-01   Canceled

Assessing,Dev & Facilita Teams

Note: Additional 150 min distance learning required

  • Course #: MPHR-503-01
  • CRN: 32197
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: TBD
  • Dates: Aug 30 – Dec 20, 2017
  • Class Meetings:

MPHR-809-01

MPS HR Capstone

This three-credit course will be the culmination of the student’s academic and professional experience in the MPS program. Over the course of the semester, students will work with an organization to help address a real life problem in the organization. The problems will be based on the concentrations of International Human Resources Management, Diversity and Inclusion or Strategic Human Capital Management. Working with their advisor, students will present the resolution to an issue to the sponsoring organization in a reasoned, systemic way. In an effort to ensure a high quality project, the capstone will also include research methods which will provide a foundation in research methods for students for their capstone. Students will learn how to design a research proposal, how to define with specificity and particularity, objectives of research, how to conduct literature reviews and how to assess and implement appropriate research methods based on the needs of the project. The course covers both qualitative methods such as case studies, questionnaires, surveys and interview techniques and an introduction to quantitative methods and data analysis. The faculty advisor will work closely with the student and the sponsoring organization to ensure that the project comprehensively addresses the issue and demonstrates the depth of competency the student gained through the Master of Professional Studies program. In addition to other requirements, students must earn a grade of "B" or higher in the Capstone course to qualify for graduation.

Note: Core requirement for MPS degree. Minimun grade of "B" needed to pass. This course is intended to teach students how to conduct and carry out research in order to develop the final requirement of their degree – the Capstone (Thesis) paper. There are five (5) major components of this course: (1) becoming a researcher, (2) identifying a researchable topic, (3) developing a Literature Review, (4) developing a Research Proposal and, (5) applying the research to a problem that you will address and/or solve in your paper (The Capstone). This means that you will learn to conduct research based on a problem that you have identified, and you will write a paper demonstrating the ability to conduct research and develop a paper using the research methods you have learned. The final outcome will be your Capstone paper to complete your Master of Professional Studies in Human Resources Management. While this is not a research methods course, the research – and the resultant Literature Review – is a critical element to successfully complete the Capstone course. Another key component of the course is qualitative methods (data collection, analysis and synthesis), which will be a critical part of your Literature Review. Students will learn the basics of qualitative methods in order to support development of a methodology for their papers.

  • Course #: MPHR-809-01
  • CRN: 20569
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Babicz, M.
  • Dates: Aug 30 – Dec 20, 2017
  • Class Meetings:

MPHR-805-01

Consulting Skills in Human Capital

As internal Human Resource professionals learn to attain the balance between tactics and strategy, they will increasingly be called on to serve as consultants. External Human Capital Consulting is one of the fastest growing segments of the Professional Services Industry. This course provides students interested in either career with a blend of concepts and practice needed to build solid consulting skills. Emphasis is placed on understanding the nature of consulting, while also scoping and delivering consulting. In addition, students will be taught how to understand the dynamics of organizational culture, relationships and organizational life. Through a series of case studies, students will learn the practical skills needed in designing, facilitating and developing practical skills in consulting. To demonstrate their understanding of consulting skills concepts and their practical application, students will be required to participate in a project simulation involving the development of a client engagement and recommending Human Capital (HC) consulting services for that client. Its purpose is to improve your consulting skills through the simulated performance of a consulting assignment.

Note: As internal Human Resource professionals learn to attain the balance between tactics and strategy, they will increasingly be called on to serve as consultants. External Human Capital Consulting is one of the fastest growing segments of the Professional Services Industry. This course provides students interested in either career with a blend of concepts and practice needed to build solid consulting skills. Emphasis is placed on understanding the nature of consulting, while also scoping and delivering consulting. In addition, students will be taught how to understand the dynamics of organizational culture, relationships and organizational life. Through a series of case studies, students will learn the practical skills needed in designing, facilitating and developing practical skills in consulting. To demonstrate their understanding of consulting skills concepts and their practical application, students will be required to participate in a project simulation involving the development of a client engagement and recommending Human Capital (HC) consulting services for that client. Its purpose is to improve your consulting skills through the simulated performance of a consulting assignment.

  • Course #: MPHR-805-01
  • CRN: 31044
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Forsythe, J.
  • Dates: Aug 30 – Dec 20, 2017
  • Class Meetings:

MPHR-707-01   Canceled

Creating and Sustaining a Climate of Inclusion

Many organizations with existing diversity initiatives have been unable to effectively use them to change the way that the organization behaves. In an effort to do so, organizations must develop a plan to move its efforts from tactical to strategic. This course examines the diversity field from an organizational perspective. Participants explore organization development theory and change models and interview, survey, feedback, data collection and analysis methods.This course includes an organization action-research practicum designed to identify and implement the cornerstones of an inclusive organization, to determine whether an organization has significant political and other barriers to becoming inclusive and to design and implement an inclusion template for organizations. Using a case study methodology, students will critique existing paradigms of inclusion and determine how to create new ones. Students will use powerful tools that are designed to address diversity as organizational change thus leading to inclusive policies, practices and procedures in all dimensions of organization life. Students will be required to present an inclusion strategy at course end.

Note: Diversity and inclusion are terms that have become ubiquitous in societies across the globe. The importance of a commitment to diversity and inclusion has been readily articulated in response to emerging demographic trends and underlying cultural changes. Diversity initiatives also are seen as solutions to intractable social upheavals. Yet diversity issues are often difficult to discuss. Why? This class will examine the tendency to narrowly define diversity (usually based on race, gender and sexual orientation). As a consequence, many important elements of diversity that go beyond visible social identity receive scant attention. We are thus obliged to ask the following initial questions • What do we mean by the terms “diversity” and “inclusion”? • How are these terms similar and how do they differ? • Why is it important to create and sustain a climate of inclusion? • What are the essential elements of an effective diversity and inclusion strategy? • What are the key challenges and what is required to analyze such challenges? This course examines diversity and inclusion from a systems perspective beginning with individual dynamics that explore cultural competency, privilege, resistance and internalized oppression. In addition, we also will examine group, institutional and broader societal dynamics that contextualize discussions of diversity and inclusion. The approach to this class will be predicated on organization development theories and processes that emphasize student centered, experiential learning that is both diagnostic and dialogic. Students will be required to develop and present a strategic diversity plan at the end of the course. In this way, the course will provide an in-depth and solid theoretical grounding for HR professionals, and others with responsibility for diversity and inclusion initiatives within organizations.

  • Course #: MPHR-707-01
  • CRN: 31042
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: TBD
  • Dates: Aug 30 – Dec 20, 2017
  • Class Meetings:

MPHR-506-01

Found of Training & Dev

This class will give students an overview of strategic training and development. Students will examine the issues involved in the design and leadership of a organization-wide training function, as well as a hand’s on understanding of the process of developing training initiatives. Topics include training needs assessment, instructional design, training development and training evaluation. This hands on course will give students the opportunity to develop a training solution for an organizational issue. Students may choose to work on training initiative in a variety of topics including training focused on diversity and inclusion, as well as international/expatriate training.

  • Course #: MPHR-506-01
  • CRN: 32200
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructors: Mazur, G. , Pic, J.
  • Dates: Aug 30 – Dec 20, 2017
  • Class Meetings:

MPHR-696-02

Foundations of HR

This course focuses on the core competencies that are essential for effectively working in the field of Human Resources (HR) and lays the groundwork for a successful journey through Georgetown’s School of Continuing Studies Master of Professional Studies in Human Resources Management program. The semester begins with a macro view of the field and its role as a critical strategic business partner to the organizations in which it functions. This “helicopter view” of HR will examine the role of HR from a strategic perspective as well as a tactical or operations perspective, and the nature of HR in different types of organizations (private enterprise, government, nonprofit, academia) will be introduced. This initial focus on the macro organization level will help establish the importance of systems thinking as a critical skill from the beginning of the course. In addition to looking outward at the field of human resources, students will be asked to look inward at themselves in order to begin their journey to increased self-awareness and personal development. Self-awareness is a cornerstone of effective interpersonal interaction, and HR professionals who have insight into their own personalities, needs, tendencies and styles can consciously choose behaviors that will allow them to be most effective in their roles as Human Resources professionals interacting with individuals, groups, and organizations. Throughout the semester, the major functions of Human Resources will be examined, along with the Human Resource professional’s role in each of those functions. Human Resource Competencies (or, what makes a Human Resource professional successful in the major functions) will be discussed in relationship to different career stages (Early Level, Mid Level, Senior Level, and Executive Level). In addition, the skills, competencies, and individual characteristics that students will be expected to gain by the time they complete the HRM program will be clearly laid out and explained, so that students can learn to manage their own growth and development throughout the program. Students will be provided with the basic skill-set and framework required for the more specialized and advanced concentration courses in the curriculum. Moreover, through the use of readings, lectures, group presentations and real-world case studies, students will gain a basic understanding and appreciation of concepts and issues relating to core HR areas including: Strategy, Talent Management, Total Rewards, Employment Law, Human Resource Development, Employee and Labor Relations, and Risk Management. Students will be expected to learn these basics while developing an awareness of the challenges facing the HR profession today.

Note: Additional 150 minute distance learning component is required.

  • Course #: MPHR-696-02
  • CRN: 29515
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructors: Browne, P. , Ho, G.
  • Dates: Aug 30 – Dec 20, 2017
  • Class Meetings:

MPHR-696-102

Foundations of HR

This course focuses on the core competencies that are essential for effectively working in the field of Human Resources (HR) and lays the groundwork for a successful journey through Georgetown’s School of Continuing Studies Master of Professional Studies in Human Resources Management program. The semester begins with a macro view of the field and its role as a critical strategic business partner to the organizations in which it functions. This “helicopter view” of HR will examine the role of HR from a strategic perspective as well as a tactical or operations perspective, and the nature of HR in different types of organizations (private enterprise, government, nonprofit, academia) will be introduced. This initial focus on the macro organization level will help establish the importance of systems thinking as a critical skill from the beginning of the course. In addition to looking outward at the field of human resources, students will be asked to look inward at themselves in order to begin their journey to increased self-awareness and personal development. Self-awareness is a cornerstone of effective interpersonal interaction, and HR professionals who have insight into their own personalities, needs, tendencies and styles can consciously choose behaviors that will allow them to be most effective in their roles as Human Resources professionals interacting with individuals, groups, and organizations. Throughout the semester, the major functions of Human Resources will be examined, along with the Human Resource professional’s role in each of those functions. Human Resource Competencies (or, what makes a Human Resource professional successful in the major functions) will be discussed in relationship to different career stages (Early Level, Mid Level, Senior Level, and Executive Level). In addition, the skills, competencies, and individual characteristics that students will be expected to gain by the time they complete the HRM program will be clearly laid out and explained, so that students can learn to manage their own growth and development throughout the program. Students will be provided with the basic skill-set and framework required for the more specialized and advanced concentration courses in the curriculum. Moreover, through the use of readings, lectures, group presentations and real-world case studies, students will gain a basic understanding and appreciation of concepts and issues relating to core HR areas including: Strategy, Talent Management, Total Rewards, Employment Law, Human Resource Development, Employee and Labor Relations, and Risk Management. Students will be expected to learn these basics while developing an awareness of the challenges facing the HR profession today.

Note: This course focuses on the core competencies that are essential for effectively working in the field of Human Resources (HR) and lays the groundwork for a successful journey through Georgetown’s School of Continuing Studies Master of Professional Studies in Human Resources Management program. The semester begins with a macro view of the field and its role as a critical strategic business partner to the organizations in which it functions. This “helicopter view” of HR will examine the role of HR from a strategic perspective as well as a tactical or operations perspective, and the nature of HR in different types of organizations (private enterprise, government, nonprofit, academia) will be introduced. This initial focus on the macro organization level will help establish the importance of systems thinking as a critical skill from the beginning of the course. In addition to looking outward at the field of human resources, students will be asked to look inward at themselves in order to begin their journey to increased self-awareness and personal development. Self-awareness is a cornerstone of effective interpersonal interaction, and HR professionals who have insight into their own personalities, needs, tendencies and styles can consciously choose behaviors that will allow them to be most effective in their roles as Human Resources professionals interacting with individuals, groups, and organizations. Throughout the semester, the major functions of Human Resources will be examined, along with the Human Resource professional’s role in each of those functions. Human Resource Competencies (or, what makes a Human Resource professional successful in the major functions) will be discussed in relationship to different career stages (Early Level, Mid Level, Senior Level, and Executive Level). In addition, the skills, competencies, and individual characteristics that students will be expected to gain by the time they complete the HRM program will be clearly laid out and explained, so that students can learn to manage their own growth and development throughout the program. Students will be provided with the basic skill-set and framework required for the more specialized and advanced concentration courses in the curriculum. Moreover, through the use of readings, lectures, group presentations and real-world case studies, students will gain a basic understanding and appreciation of concepts and issues relating to core HR areas including: Strategy, Talent Management, Total Rewards, Employment Law, Human Resource Development, Employee and Labor Relations, and Risk Management. Students will be expected to learn these basics while developing an awareness of the challenges facing the HR profession today.


MPHR-696-101

Foundations of HR

This course focuses on the core competencies that are essential for effectively working in the field of Human Resources (HR) and lays the groundwork for a successful journey through Georgetown’s School of Continuing Studies Master of Professional Studies in Human Resources Management program. The semester begins with a macro view of the field and its role as a critical strategic business partner to the organizations in which it functions. This “helicopter view” of HR will examine the role of HR from a strategic perspective as well as a tactical or operations perspective, and the nature of HR in different types of organizations (private enterprise, government, nonprofit, academia) will be introduced. This initial focus on the macro organization level will help establish the importance of systems thinking as a critical skill from the beginning of the course. In addition to looking outward at the field of human resources, students will be asked to look inward at themselves in order to begin their journey to increased self-awareness and personal development. Self-awareness is a cornerstone of effective interpersonal interaction, and HR professionals who have insight into their own personalities, needs, tendencies and styles can consciously choose behaviors that will allow them to be most effective in their roles as Human Resources professionals interacting with individuals, groups, and organizations. Throughout the semester, the major functions of Human Resources will be examined, along with the Human Resource professional’s role in each of those functions. Human Resource Competencies (or, what makes a Human Resource professional successful in the major functions) will be discussed in relationship to different career stages (Early Level, Mid Level, Senior Level, and Executive Level). In addition, the skills, competencies, and individual characteristics that students will be expected to gain by the time they complete the HRM program will be clearly laid out and explained, so that students can learn to manage their own growth and development throughout the program. Students will be provided with the basic skill-set and framework required for the more specialized and advanced concentration courses in the curriculum. Moreover, through the use of readings, lectures, group presentations and real-world case studies, students will gain a basic understanding and appreciation of concepts and issues relating to core HR areas including: Strategy, Talent Management, Total Rewards, Employment Law, Human Resource Development, Employee and Labor Relations, and Risk Management. Students will be expected to learn these basics while developing an awareness of the challenges facing the HR profession today.

Note: Core requirement for MPS-HRM degree. Minimum grade required is “B” to continue eligibility toward graduation. This course meets online.


MPHR-696-01   Canceled

Foundations of HR

This course focuses on the core competencies that are essential for effectively working in the field of Human Resources (HR) and lays the groundwork for a successful journey through Georgetown’s School of Continuing Studies Master of Professional Studies in Human Resources Management program. The semester begins with a macro view of the field and its role as a critical strategic business partner to the organizations in which it functions. This “helicopter view” of HR will examine the role of HR from a strategic perspective as well as a tactical or operations perspective, and the nature of HR in different types of organizations (private enterprise, government, nonprofit, academia) will be introduced. This initial focus on the macro organization level will help establish the importance of systems thinking as a critical skill from the beginning of the course. In addition to looking outward at the field of human resources, students will be asked to look inward at themselves in order to begin their journey to increased self-awareness and personal development. Self-awareness is a cornerstone of effective interpersonal interaction, and HR professionals who have insight into their own personalities, needs, tendencies and styles can consciously choose behaviors that will allow them to be most effective in their roles as Human Resources professionals interacting with individuals, groups, and organizations. Throughout the semester, the major functions of Human Resources will be examined, along with the Human Resource professional’s role in each of those functions. Human Resource Competencies (or, what makes a Human Resource professional successful in the major functions) will be discussed in relationship to different career stages (Early Level, Mid Level, Senior Level, and Executive Level). In addition, the skills, competencies, and individual characteristics that students will be expected to gain by the time they complete the HRM program will be clearly laid out and explained, so that students can learn to manage their own growth and development throughout the program. Students will be provided with the basic skill-set and framework required for the more specialized and advanced concentration courses in the curriculum. Moreover, through the use of readings, lectures, group presentations and real-world case studies, students will gain a basic understanding and appreciation of concepts and issues relating to core HR areas including: Strategy, Talent Management, Total Rewards, Employment Law, Human Resource Development, Employee and Labor Relations, and Risk Management. Students will be expected to learn these basics while developing an awareness of the challenges facing the HR profession today.

Note: 150 distance learning minutes needed for this elective course.

  • Course #: MPHR-696-01
  • CRN: 20433
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: TBD
  • Dates: Aug 30 – Dec 20, 2017
  • Class Meetings:

MPHR-800-01   Canceled

Global Labor and Employment Law

This course will begin with an overview of the study of international and comparative law. The overview will be followed by weekly analysis of core areas of labor and employment law by topic. These topics include anti­-discrimination, employee privacy, wage/hour/benefits, unions and collective bargaining, immigration and dispute resolution systems. The laws of North America will be the central focus of the course with a weekly comparative analysis of these laws of one or more relevant foreign countries in Europe, Latin America, Canada and/or Asia. The course will conclude with group presentations and individual papers on an assigned “hot topic” issue in labor and employment that will require the students to demonstrate mastery of comparative analysis and command of the labor systems of at least 3 countries.

Note: This course will begin with an overview of the study of international and comparative law. The overview will be followed by weekly analysis of core areas of labor and employment law by topic. These topics include anti­-discrimination, employee privacy, wage/hour/benefits, unions and collective bargaining, immigration and dispute resolution systems. The laws of North America will be the central focus of the course with a weekly comparative analysis of these laws of one or more relevant foreign countries in Europe, Latin America, Canada and/or Asia. The course will conclude with group presentations and individual papers on an assigned “hot topic” issue in labor and employment that will require the students to demonstrate mastery of comparative analysis and command of the labor systems of at least 3 countries.

  • Course #: MPHR-800-01
  • CRN: 32201
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: TBD
  • Dates: Aug 30 – Dec 20, 2017
  • Class Meetings:

MPHR-712-01

Graduate Internships in HR

As students advance through the Master’s in Human Resources Management program (Program),they deepen their knowledge of human resources (HR) concepts, theories, and academic research. While this foundational learning is critical, many students seek added opportunities to gain professional experience and position themselves as future leaders in the field. Accordingly, the Graduate Internships in Human Resources Management course (Course) is designed to complement the Program’s other courses primarily through “on-the-job” experiential learning. Experiential learning serves to bridge the gap between theory and practice, and increases engagement levels by allowing for the meaningful discussion of academic concepts through the lens of real world experiences.

Note: As students advance through the Master’s in Human Resources Management program (Program),they deepen their knowledge of human resources (HR) concepts, theories, and academic research. While this foundational learning is critical, many students seek added opportunities to gain professional experience and position themselves as future leaders in the field. Accordingly, the Graduate Internships in Human Resources Management course (Course) is designed to complement the Program’s other courses primarily through “on-the-job” experiential learning. Experiential learning serves to bridge the gap between theory and practice, and increases engagement levels by allowing for the meaningful discussion of academic concepts through the lens of real world experiences.

  • Course #: MPHR-712-01
  • CRN: 31301
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Ho, G.
  • Dates: Aug 30 – Dec 20, 2017
  • Class Meetings:

MPHR-817-01

HR in the International Context

This course explores the continuing evolution of International HR management in an increasingly global business environment. It focuses on a number of specific areas faced by multinational organizations, including business structures, international ethics, international training and performance management, global CSR, and security issues. The course also investigates how HR is influenced by culture, and how different regions approach HR management.

Note: This course explores the continuing evolution of International HR management in an increasingly global business environment. It focuses on a number of specific areas faced by multinational organizations, including business structures, international ethics, international training and performance management, global CSR, and security issues. The course also investigates how HR is influenced by culture, and how different regions approach HR management.

  • Course #: MPHR-817-01
  • CRN: 31045
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Babicz, M.
  • Dates: Aug 30 – Dec 20, 2017
  • Class Meetings:

MPHR-725-01

Human Capital Analytics

Leading companies are using Human Capital Analytics for workforce reporting and to help make better, more informed decisions about their human capital. There is a continuum of the value that analytics bring to an organization: basic data reporting, benchmarking and advanced reporting, survey analytics and predictive analytics. Organizations are looking for Human Resource professional who can improve their impact on the business by using the latest analytical tools and techniques. In this course we will focus on developing a foundation in statistical techniques and data management using IBM-SPSS. We will explore workforce reporting and the analytics traditionally used to improve decision-making. We will also introduce advanced analytical tools and techniques, such as predictive modeling, which is making it possible for organizations to glimpse into the future and make informed predictions.

Note: Students are required to use SPSS Software.

  • Course #: MPHR-725-01
  • CRN: 25433
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Olesen, E.
  • Dates: Aug 30 – Dec 20, 2017
  • Class Meetings:

MPHR-505-01

Introduction to Organizational Development

Change has been a constant in organizations since the 1990’s. Organization development (OD) is an evolving body of knowledge, research, and practice that helps organizational leaders take a systematic, planned approach to change that leverages the interdependencies within and external to the organization. Drawing upon its multi-disciplinary and inter-disciplinary roots in, for example, organizational and industrial psychology, sociology, theories of motivation, learning, and personality, organization development has been successfully used to improve performance, production, effectiveness, efficiency and employee engagement. This course introduces students to the rich body of principals, knowledge, skills that are used to bring about and sustain change in organizations. It highlights the view of organizations as living systems with human dynamics that impact every dimension of an organization and influences the outcome of every aspect of work an organization undertakes. It also focuses on the current realities for organizations, including globalization, virtual offices and multi-cultural workforce. Topics include: systems theory, change models, the use of collaborative consultation, use of self, group dynamics, the role of leaders in change, the role of resistance, data collection and discovery, and interventions.

Note: Change has been a constant in organizations since the 1990’s. Organization development (OD) is an evolving body of knowledge, research, and practice that helps organizational leaders take a systematic, planned approach to change that leverages the interdependencies within and external to the organization. Drawing upon its multi-disciplinary and inter-disciplinary roots in, for example, organizational and industrial psychology, sociology, theories of motivation, learning, and personality, organization development has been successfully used to improve performance, production, effectiveness, efficiency and employee engagement. This course introduces students to the rich body of principals, knowledge, skills that are used to bring about and sustain change in organizations. It highlights the view of organizations as living systems with human dynamics that impact every dimension of an organization and influences the outcome of every aspect of work an organization undertakes. It also focuses on the current realities for organizations, including globalization, virtual offices and multi-cultural workforce. Topics include: systems theory, change models, the use of collaborative consultation, use of self, group dynamics, the role of leaders in change, the role of resistance, data collection and discovery, and interventions.

  • Course #: MPHR-505-01
  • CRN: 32199
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Mazur, G.
  • Dates: Aug 30 – Dec 20, 2017
  • Class Meetings:

MPHR-705-01

Multinational Business Policy and Geopolitics

This course will provide an overview of return on investment calculation and how the techniques can be related to the diversity management profession. Among the topics covered will be: return on investment basics, decision making under uncertainty and risk measuring diversity risk with probability distributions, analyzing the hard benefits of diversity, cost avoidance, the soft benefits increasing the Knowledge Base. In addition, the course will explore and examine measurement and assessment methodologies. Students will be exposed to and be given tools to help with the design and practice of organizational diversity and change strategies/programs that address diversity, inclusion and oppression. Significant emphasis will be placed on qualitative as well as quantitative metrics and the limitations of each.

Note: This course focuses on the international environment of business and the strategic choices facing organizations engaged in international business operations. Topics include the structure and competitive dynamics of international industries, trade and trade theory, forms of transnational and multinational business, global competition and global strategies, balancing local demands and global integration, the role of culture and government in international business, international markets, and the management issues in multinational firms. Students will then be given the tools and strategies to link global talent management and human resource practices and principles to each of these topics using the case study approach. Students will be asked to take a critical approach to Corporate Social Responsibility and its impact on business policy. Finally, the course will help students make the nexus between geopolitics, multinational policy, and human resource decisions.

  • Course #: MPHR-705-01
  • CRN: 33058
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Martucci, W.
  • Dates: Aug 30 – Dec 20, 2017
  • Class Meetings:

MPHR-502-01

Research Process and Methodology

This course is an overview of research methodology in applied settings (e.g., organizations). Over the course of the semester we will cover both qualitative and quantitative approaches to conducting research (e.g., surveys, interviews, focus groups) in organizational settings. Students will develop a conceptual understanding of research design and quantitative analysis options for the consumer of research, learn the appropriate use of vocabulary and interpretation of research findings, and learn how to critique research articles and develop a small-scale proposal. This is an interactive course, where students will share their intellectual passions, collaboratively create ideas, and actively write and/or research during class sessions. This approach allows students to learn hands-on the skills necessary to be competent researchers and scholar-practitioners.

Note: Foundation requirement for students admitted to the HRM major in/after Fall 2013.

  • Course #: MPHR-502-01
  • CRN: 26035
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructors: Hughes, M. , Kiger, T.
  • Dates: Aug 30 – Dec 20, 2017
  • Class Meetings:

MPHR-504-01

Staffing the Org.

The class will focus on the role that systematic staffing practices play in a firms talent management process. Topics include human resource planning, recruitment, assessment and testing, selection, placement and on-boarding. The course will draw on the behavioral science literature dealing with assessment and selection, as well as the legal and strategic issues involved in systematic staffing efforts. The role of staffing in facilitating diversity and inclusion will be a particular focus of the course.

Note: Additional 150 minutes distance learning required.

  • Course #: MPHR-504-01
  • CRN: 32198
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructors: Reeder, M. , Sparks, T.
  • Dates: Aug 30 – Dec 20, 2017
  • Class Meetings:

MPHR-818-01

Strategic Planning & HR Strat.

Significant attention is often placed on the role of the HR practitioner as a “Strategic Partner.” “Strategic Planning and Human Resources Strategy” provides an introduction to the business strategic planning process and the role that the human resources process plays in it. Guided by the company’s purpose and mission, an organization develops a strategic plan to ensure that all its activities are integrated and reflect long-term goals. This course will examine the strategic planning process, with an emphasis on the financial, market, and organizational forces that impact strategic choices. Having laid a general foundation in strategy formulation, the course will explore the role that the human resources function plays in the development of organizational strategy. Finally, the course will turn to the responsibility of human resources to develop HR strategies that are aligned to the organization’s strategy and empower HR to advance the company’s purpose and mission. Throughout the course, practical examples of organizational strategic plans supplement assigned readings and classroom discussions. By the conclusion of the course, students will feel comfortable participating in and contributing to the strategic planning process. Students will also have an understanding of how to position the HR function to contribute strategically to the organization.

Note: Significant attention is often placed on the role of the HR practitioner as a “Strategic Partner.” “Strategic Planning and Human Resources Strategy” provides an introduction to the business strategic planning process and the role that the human resources process plays in it. Guided by the company’s purpose and mission, an organization develops a strategic plan to ensure that all its activities are integrated and reflect long-term goals. This course will examine the strategic planning process, with an emphasis on the financial, market, and organizational forces that impact strategic choices. Having laid a general foundation in strategy formulation, the course will explore the role that the human resources function plays in the development of organizational strategy. Finally, the course will turn to the responsibility of human resources to develop HR strategies that are aligned to the organization’s strategy and empower HR to advance the company’s purpose and mission. Throughout the course, practical examples of organizational strategic plans supplement assigned readings and classroom discussions. By the conclusion of the course, students will feel comfortable participating in and contributing to the strategic planning process. Students will also have an understanding of how to position the HR function to contribute strategically to the organization.

  • Course #: MPHR-818-01
  • CRN: 32202
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Browne, P.
  • Dates: Aug 30 – Dec 20, 2017
  • Class Meetings:

MPHR-802-01   Canceled

Strategic Thinking in HR

The most concise definition of “strategy” is also the most elegant: a strategy is an integrated set of choices. Creating an integrated set of choices and then implementing them can be a powerful prescription for change, but doing so is also fraught with challenge. Among other things, the capable strategist must: See past the presenting problem(s). Unearth the underlying problem(s). Employ systems thinking, which includes understanding that in organizations, nothing operates in a vacuum. Rather, any one element affects every other element. “If you pick up one end of the stick, you pick up the other.” Complete a comprehensive analysis—often quantitative and qualitative—of factors contributing to the underlying problem(s). Draw thoughtful conclusions from the analysis, and use those conclusions to create a strategic solution to the underlying problem(s), often one that considers the impact of the solution now and over the long-term. Articulate specific and detailed tactics and action steps that directly support the strategic framework. Communicate, socialize, and sell the strategic solution to key stakeholders, establishing commitment over compliance. Implement each tactic of the strategic solution with focus and discipline, often over a long time horizon. Monitor and evaluate the effectiveness of the strategic solution, course-correcting when necessary. This approach is essential to the modern, 21st century HR practitioner, who is increasingly central to most organizations’ effectiveness. Today, organizations compete on three criteria: (1) ideas, (2) speed, and (3) talent, with talent being the lynchpin of the three. Talent gives rise to innovative ideas, and talent executes those ideas rapidly, enabling an organization to reach the market faster than its competitors. The principles also hold in the public and non-profit sectors. Hence, a strategic approach to Human Resources can enable a business and its employees to thrive and grow.

Note: The most concise definition of “strategy” is also the most elegant: a strategy is an integrated set of choices. Creating an integrated set of choices and then implementing them can be a powerful prescription for change, but doing so is also fraught with challenge. Among other things, the capable strategist must: See past the presenting problem(s). Unearth the underlying problem(s).Employ systems thinking, which includes understanding that in organizations, nothing operates in a vacuum. Rather, any one element affects every other element. “If you pick up one end of the stick, you pick up the other.” Complete a comprehensive analysis—often quantitative and qualitative—of factors contributing to the underlying problem(s). Draw thoughtful conclusions from the analysis, and use those conclusions to create a strategic solution to the underlying problem(s), often one that considers the impact of the solution now and over the long-term. Articulate specific and detailed tactics and action steps that directly support the strategic framework. Communicate, socialize, and sell the strategic solution to key stakeholders, establishing commitment over compliance. Implement each tactic of the strategic solution with focus and discipline, often over a long time horizon. Monitor and evaluate the effectiveness of the strategic solution, course-correcting when necessary. This approach is essential to the modern, 21st century HR practitioner, who is increasingly central to most organizations’ effectiveness. Today, organizations compete on three criteria: (1) ideas, (2) speed, and (3) talent, with talent being the lynchpin of the three. Talent gives rise to innovative ideas, and talent executes those ideas rapidly, enabling an organization to reach the market faster than its competitors. The principles also hold in the public and non-profit sectors. Hence, a strategic approach to Human Resources can enable a business and its employees to thrive and grow.

  • Course #: MPHR-802-01
  • CRN: 31043
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: TBD
  • Dates: Aug 30 – Dec 20, 2017
  • Class Meetings:

MPHR-700-02

Workplace Ethics

This three-credit core course is required for all MPS students. It will emphasize core values endemic to the professional world, cutting across several disciplines but with a particular focus on the connections between applied ethics and human resources and diversity. Professionals in various fields, such as H.R., diversity, business, and government, will guest lecture and present the students with real-world case studies which gives them the opportunity to apply ethical principles to their work. The Ethics course is required of all MPS students and should be taken in the first semester of study. In addition to other requirements, students must earn a grade of "B" or higher in the Ethics course to qualify for graduation.

Note: Core requirement for MPS degree. Minimum grade of "B" needed to pass. Additional 150 minute distance learning component is required.

  • Course #: MPHR-700-02
  • CRN: 29514
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: Meredith, J.
  • Dates: Aug 30 – Dec 20, 2017
  • Class Meetings:

MPHR-700-01   Canceled

Workplace Ethics

This three-credit core course is required for all MPS students. It will emphasize core values endemic to the professional world, cutting across several disciplines but with a particular focus on the connections between applied ethics and human resources and diversity. Professionals in various fields, such as H.R., diversity, business, and government, will guest lecture and present the students with real-world case studies which gives them the opportunity to apply ethical principles to their work. The Ethics course is required of all MPS students and should be taken in the first semester of study. In addition to other requirements, students must earn a grade of "B" or higher in the Ethics course to qualify for graduation.

Note: Core requirement for MPS degree. Minimum grade of "B" needed to pass. This course includes a 150 min. distance learning component.

  • Course #: MPHR-700-01
  • CRN: 18087
  • Format: On-campus
  • Instructor: TBD
  • Dates: Aug 30 – Dec 20, 2017
  • Class Meetings:

MPHR-700-102

Workplace Ethics

This three-credit core course is required for all MPS students. It will emphasize core values endemic to the professional world, cutting across several disciplines but with a particular focus on the connections between applied ethics and human resources and diversity. Professionals in various fields, such as H.R., diversity, business, and government, will guest lecture and present the students with real-world case studies which gives them the opportunity to apply ethical principles to their work. The Ethics course is required of all MPS students and should be taken in the first semester of study. In addition to other requirements, students must earn a grade of "B" or higher in the Ethics course to qualify for graduation.

Note: This three-credit core course is required for all MPS students. It will emphasize core values endemic to the professional world, cutting across several disciplines but with a particular focus on the connections between applied ethics and human resources and diversity. Professionals in various fields, such as H.R., diversity, business, and government, will guest lecture and present the students with real-world case studies which gives them the opportunity to apply ethical principles to their work. The Ethics course is required of all MPS students and should be taken in the first semester of study. In addition to other requirements, students must earn a grade of "B" or higher in the Ethics course to qualify for graduation.

  • Course #: MPHR-700-102
  • CRN: 33853
  • Format: Online
  • Instructor: Meredith, J.
  • Dates: Aug 30 – Dec 20, 2017

MPHR-700-101

Workplace Ethics

This three-credit core course is required for all MPS students. It will emphasize core values endemic to the professional world, cutting across several disciplines but with a particular focus on the connections between applied ethics and human resources and diversity. Professionals in various fields, such as H.R., diversity, business, and government, will guest lecture and present the students with real-world case studies which gives them the opportunity to apply ethical principles to their work. The Ethics course is required of all MPS students and should be taken in the first semester of study. In addition to other requirements, students must earn a grade of "B" or higher in the Ethics course to qualify for graduation.

Note: Core requirement for MPS-HRM degree. Minimum grade required is “B” to continue eligibility toward graduation. This course meets online.